Jul 24, 2015
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I'm a 4th year undergraduate in UC Berkeley anticipated to go get my B.A. in Integrative Biology. I have not taken the MCAT and I do not have the competitive GPA for MD programs here in the U.S. and lately I've been pondering about studying medicine in the Philippines and coming back for the residency
Below is a list of reasons why I've been considering studying there:
  1. low-cost to live and study. Tuition there is roughly the same as the in-state tuition for undergraduates at UC schools (~$13,000/year)
  2. U.S. curriculum - classes are taught in english
  3. Philippine medical schools have U.S. affiliations. Medical students can take their 4th year clinical rotation in the U.S. affiliated hospitals
  4. You can take your USMLE step 1 and 2 while being a med school student there
  5. It will be an amazing learning experience to live in a tropical country with stark differences in various geographical locations within the country (culture wise)
  6. Personal opinion: it's a financially more strategic to study in the Philippines because I will get out of medical school low in student debt or debt free
On the other hand there are still downsides of studying abroad when my ultimate goal is to practice medicine here in the U.S.
  1. Residency matching is much more competitive for IMG, whether they are U.S. Citizens or not ( I am a U.S. Citizen)
  2. 5th year clinical will most likely be needed as the clinical hours that med schools in the Philippines provide is not sufficient for the hours required for residency matching
  3. I will have to acculturate myself to this new and different society.

Ultimately, I want to practice medicine in both countries but still live in the U.S.. Lately I have been internalizing all these thoughts, and I would like to hear your thoughts about studying in the Philippines and have a discussion about this.

Thanks!
 

Doudline

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My thoughts? Very negative.

Low tuition is well overshadowed by the year of projected salary loss and IMG status. It's a huge gamble.

If you want to practice in the Philippines, train in the Philippines.
If you want to practice in the USA, train in the USA.
 
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mariambaby3

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Obviously there will be exceptions, but as a Non-US Citizen (and presumably no Green Card right?) who graduated from a med school in the Philippines, you will have close to zero chance matching into a US residency program.
 

studentdocftw

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Retake courses, apply to Touro-CA and Western Pomona.
 

BluMist

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Obviously there will be exceptions, but as a Non-US Citizen (and presumably no Green Card right?) who graduated from a med school in the Philippines, you will have close to zero chance matching into a US residency program.
He is a US Citizen per his post, so it would technically increase the chance of matching significantly compare to other internationals, but probably still very low compare to US programs.
 
OP
lakas12
Jul 24, 2015
20
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Obviously there will be exceptions, but as a Non-US Citizen (and presumably no Green Card right?) who graduated from a med school in the Philippines, you will have close to zero chance matching into a US residency program.
I am a U.S. Citizen. I have heard success stories from IMG that are US Citizens. Though it is true that it is nearly impossible for Non-citizen IMG to be able to practice medicine in the U.S.
 
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lakas12
Jul 24, 2015
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He is a US Citizen per his post, so it would technically increase the chance of matching significantly compare to other internationals, but probably still very low compare to US programs.
This is true the fact that I have read from another forum that American citizen IMGs usually apply to schools 2 to 3 times more than the US medical graduates to increase the likelihood
 

mimelim

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He is a US Citizen per his post, so it would technically increase the chance of matching significantly compare to other internationals, but probably still very low compare to US programs.
This is not true. A bad student is still a bad student.

I am a U.S. Citizen. I have heard success stories from IMG that are US Citizens. Though it is true that it is nearly impossible for Non-citizen IMG to be able to practice medicine in the U.S.
We will take foreign IMGs over US citizens who go overseas every day of the week. Foreign citizen grads tend to be the best of the best. Americans who go overseas tend to be bottom of the barrel.
 

mimelim

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I'm a 4th year undergraduate in UC Berkeley anticipated to go get my B.A. in Integrative Biology. I have not taken the MCAT and I do not have the competitive GPA for MD programs here in the U.S. and lately I've been pondering about studying medicine in the Philippines and coming back for the residency
Below is a list of reasons why I've been considering studying there:
  1. low-cost to live and study. Tuition there is roughly the same as the in-state tuition for undergraduates at UC schools (~$13,000/year)
  2. U.S. curriculum - classes are taught in english
  3. Philippine medical schools have U.S. affiliations. Medical students can take their 4th year clinical rotation in the U.S. affiliated hospitals
  4. You can take your USMLE step 1 and 2 while being a med school student there
  5. It will be an amazing learning experience to live in a tropical country with stark differences in various geographical locations within the country (culture wise)
  6. Personal opinion: it's a financially more strategic to study in the Philippines because I will get out of medical school low in student debt or debt free
On the other hand there are still downsides of studying abroad when my ultimate goal is to practice medicine here in the U.S.
  1. Residency matching is much more competitive for IMG, whether they are U.S. Citizens or not ( I am a U.S. Citizen)
  2. 5th year clinical will most likely be needed as the clinical hours that med schools in the Philippines provide is not sufficient for the hours required for residency matching
  3. I will have to acculturate myself to this new and different society.

Ultimately, I want to practice medicine in both countries but still live in the U.S.. Lately I have been internalizing all these thoughts, and I would like to hear your thoughts about studying in the Philippines and have a discussion about this.

Thanks!
Going to school in the Philippians will give you the chance to apply to US residencies. Assuming that you:

a) Do extremely well (unlikely given your past academic performance)
b) Pass the USMLE exams
c) Are willing to go into a less competitive specialty and don't care where in the US you go to residency.
d) Despite doing a, b and c are okay with the very real chance that you will never get a categorical residency in the US.

Then yes, going to overseas is okay. If any of those are poor assumptions, then it is a complete waste of time.

There are ways to repair a GPA. There is the DO route. Both of which are preferable to going overseas.
 
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Your post tells me you haven't addressed any of the issues keeping you out of a chance at a US medical school. You've shown lack of patience and poor decision making by shunning the option of reinvention or entertaining being a DO
 
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getdown

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I'm a 4th year undergraduate in UC Berkeley anticipated to go get my B.A. in Integrative Biology. I have not taken the MCAT and I do not have the competitive GPA for MD programs here in the U.S. and lately I've been pondering about studying medicine in the Philippines and coming back for the residency
Below is a list of reasons why I've been considering studying there:
  1. low-cost to live and study. Tuition there is roughly the same as the in-state tuition for undergraduates at UC schools (~$13,000/year)
  2. U.S. curriculum - classes are taught in english
  3. Philippine medical schools have U.S. affiliations. Medical students can take their 4th year clinical rotation in the U.S. affiliated hospitals
  4. You can take your USMLE step 1 and 2 while being a med school student there
  5. It will be an amazing learning experience to live in a tropical country with stark differences in various geographical locations within the country (culture wise)
  6. Personal opinion: it's a financially more strategic to study in the Philippines because I will get out of medical school low in student debt or debt free
On the other hand there are still downsides of studying abroad when my ultimate goal is to practice medicine here in the U.S.
  1. Residency matching is much more competitive for IMG, whether they are U.S. Citizens or not ( I am a U.S. Citizen)
  2. 5th year clinical will most likely be needed as the clinical hours that med schools in the Philippines provide is not sufficient for the hours required for residency matching
  3. I will have to acculturate myself to this new and different society.

Ultimately, I want to practice medicine in both countries but still live in the U.S.. Lately I have been internalizing all these thoughts, and I would like to hear your thoughts about studying in the Philippines and have a discussion about this.

Thanks!
Just don't do it. I would suggest trying to make up those bad grades or do a post-bacc (and do well) to show you have the academic ability to get through medical school. If you don't get in after 2 application cycles I would say try a different career or pursue medicine in the Philippines and just stay there to practice as you'll have a very low chance of coming back for a US residency. A sign of intelligence is knowing when to give up early so as to not waste time and resources for a pipe dream.

Some might say I'm being harsh but I've met too many people who've wasted time and money to either:
1. fail completely and are now angry at wasting that time and money
2. go IMG, carib etc and end up with an MD degree that's worthless with tons of debt
3. end up making it to a US MD/DO school and realizing medicine isn't what they expected and are now pissed they still wasted time and money for a career they hate
 

Ad2b

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Have you lived, visited the Philippines?
 
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el_duderino

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My question is what makes him think he's prepared to succeed in medical school *anywhere* if he hasn't even been successful in undergrad.
 
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el_duderino

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OP
lakas12
Jul 24, 2015
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My question is what makes him think he's prepared to succeed in medical school *anywhere* if he hasn't even been successful in undergrad.
There are other ways in which I believed I have been successful as undergrad. There are areas in which I have excelled - both in academics and outside academia. GPA might be one of the major determinants of admission to medical school, but I am more than my "uncompetitive" gpa for medical school.

I struggled maintaining a high gpa in my first two years of undergraduate due to circumstances that are beyond my control. Though there's an upward trend, I fear it would still be insufficient to be good enough for MD programs, which is 3.5 or higher. Also take note that Berkeley has a great grade deflation (I inserted an article about this in there) in premed courses, not that I am using it as my reason for my low gpa, it's just it's another factor to add on to my struggles on getting high gpa.

Another factor that's holding me back to go to medical school here is the cost - the fact that on average, a medical student debt is over $175,000 and if I choose to go to post bac it would be another financial burden for me. I know I want to be a physician, but the institution has placed a great burden to the not-so-privileged individuals (like me). Inevitably the reality is, medicine IS about money too.
 
OP
lakas12
Jul 24, 2015
20
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Just don't do it. I would suggest trying to make up those bad grades or do a post-bacc (and do well) to show you have the academic ability to get through medical school. If you don't get in after 2 application cycles I would say try a different career or pursue medicine in the Philippines and just stay there to practice as you'll have a very low chance of coming back for a US residency. A sign of intelligence is knowing when to give up early so as to not waste time and resources for a pipe dream.

Some might say I'm being harsh but I've met too many people who've wasted time and money to either:
1. fail completely and are now angry at wasting that time and money
2. go IMG, carib etc and end up with an MD degree that's worthless with tons of debt
3. end up making it to a US MD/DO school and realizing medicine isn't what they expected and are now pissed they still wasted time and money for a career they hate
Thank you for your insightful input! those are definitely valid points. I'm well aware that many doctors I've talked to even regret the path they've chosen. Though it's not an easy decision, I am still taking my time and exploring different routes for MD and other related careers.
 

NewHorizons

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There are other ways in which I believed I have been successful as undergrad. There are areas in which I have excelled - both in academics and outside academia. GPA might be one of the major determinants of admission to medical school, but I am more than my "uncompetitive" gpa for medical school.

I struggled maintaining a high gpa in my first two years of undergraduate due to circumstances that are beyond my control. Though there's an upward trend, I fear it would still be insufficient to be good enough for MD programs, which is 3.5 or higher. Also take note that Berkeley has a great grade deflation (I inserted an article about this in there) in premed courses, not that I am using it as my reason for my low gpa, it's just it's another factor to add on to my struggles on getting high gpa.

Another factor that's holding me back to go to medical school here is the cost - the fact that on average, a medical student debt is over $175,000 and if I choose to go to post bac it would be another financial burden for me. I know I want to be a physician, but the institution has placed a great burden to the not-so-privileged individuals (like me). Inevitably the reality is, medicine IS about money too.
I'm sorry but reading your OP then seeing this I just see inexperience written all over it.

You can at least get loans and slowly pay them off as a physician in the US. You may never get any financial assistance and never come back to the US to practice, let alone graduate. While I'm unsure of your financial situation, there are many options available for students on top of working part/full time. That's life.

Blaming grade inflation or deflation is just ridiculous. I don't know what personal factors you've had that led to your struggles but many other people (even on this forum) had struggled for years and turned themselves around with lots of reinvention and hard work. If you struggle with grade deflation then you will not be able to handle medical school.

The reality of this forum is that going anywhere outside NA is a bad idea, especially if you want to ever come back. I'm not sure what you expected from the community.
 
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Roxas

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@lakas12 are you Filipino by any chance? I ask because lakas is a tagalog word
 
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Roxas

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Yes I am.
Have you ever lived there? Mahusay k p b sa tagalog? :)

As far as med school, I think it's been said enough that it's a risky move to try and study there if you have no intent on practicing there. Retake classes, bust ass on the MCAT, do whatever you need to get into a US school and you'll be happier
 

Gibbward

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I've lived there for the majority of my life, my dad was a doctor there, and my mom still is a practicing doctor there and is a very high ranked person in a well-known (but not the best) medical school there, so I think I know something about med schools there. My mom's been trying to convince me to move back there to go to med school, but I WILL NOT.

My main reason is what people have already mentioned - the residency match rate. I do know older family friends who were able to match and find a residency in the US, but they also intended to go back to the PI afterwards, so I don't know how building a career in the US would be like. I also have other family friends who've been trying for 3-5 years to match into a US residency and still haven't succeeded.

I can't say too much about the quality of their MD education. What I can tell you is that I know people with TERRIBLE undergrad GPAs that are in medical schools right now. Getting into medical school was definitely not a big issue. Now, I can't say for sure if they are passing because MD standards aren't as high in the US, or if they were just able to re-invent themselves and now do well in classes. My mom has a ton of stories about lecturers in her school that do not do their jobs well, while there are others who are great and have a lot of experience in their field. It just depends on where you get in a suppose. What I can definitely say is that when it comes to facilities, resources, and research opportunities, PI MD schools are not even close to those here in the US. This might also hinder your chances of getting a US residency.

Culture wise, it really isn't all that different. The PI tries very hard to keep up with the trends and fads in America. The food selection is GREAT. There are some really great areas for night life, and people are friendly as f*** (especially if you have an american accent) :D The biggest culture change you would face is really just the level of disorganization, the uncleanliness, and the poverty. NO ONE follows driving "laws". Public transportation is inefficient, unreliable and just straight up sucks a big D. There are a lot of beggars and homeless people in the streets. There are tons of squatters areas with make-shift houses for people who are dirt poor and can't afford to own land/a real house. And generally, most cities in Manila just feel dirty. Plus, you always feel dirty and sticky because of the god awful humidity. Oh, and you definitely shouldn't drink tap water.

So in summary, if you want to practice medicine in America, go to school here. It is definitely possible to match here in the US, but your chances are greatly reduced. Quality of education really depends on the place and it is definitely what you make of it. I love my motherland, but the grass is definitely greener here in the US :spam::spam::spam::spam: <-- you get it ;)
 

Gandyy

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I'm a 4th year undergraduate in UC Berkeley anticipated to go get my B.A. in Integrative Biology. I have not taken the MCAT and I do not have the competitive GPA for MD programs here in the U.S. and lately I've been pondering about studying medicine in the Philippines and coming back for the residency
Below is a list of reasons why I've been considering studying there:
  1. low-cost to live and study. Tuition there is roughly the same as the in-state tuition for undergraduates at UC schools (~$13,000/year)
  2. U.S. curriculum - classes are taught in english
  3. Philippine medical schools have U.S. affiliations. Medical students can take their 4th year clinical rotation in the U.S. affiliated hospitals
  4. You can take your USMLE step 1 and 2 while being a med school student there
  5. It will be an amazing learning experience to live in a tropical country with stark differences in various geographical locations within the country (culture wise)
  6. Personal opinion: it's a financially more strategic to study in the Philippines because I will get out of medical school low in student debt or debt free
On the other hand there are still downsides of studying abroad when my ultimate goal is to practice medicine here in the U.S.
  1. Residency matching is much more competitive for IMG, whether they are U.S. Citizens or not ( I am a U.S. Citizen)
  2. 5th year clinical will most likely be needed as the clinical hours that med schools in the Philippines provide is not sufficient for the hours required for residency matching
  3. I will have to acculturate myself to this new and different society.

Ultimately, I want to practice medicine in both countries but still live in the U.S.. Lately I have been internalizing all these thoughts, and I would like to hear your thoughts about studying in the Philippines and have a discussion about this.

Thanks!

Dont do it OP. The merger is going to make it even harder for IMGs to match in the USA than it already is.
 

el_duderino

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The first step is to take ownership of your shortcomings. Only then can you properly address them.

If there's a reason US schools don't want you, the smart thing to do is own it and fix it. The stupid thing to do is to run off to a foreign country because they have low standards.
 
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Gandyy

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The first step is to take ownership of your shortcomings. Only then can you properly address them.

If there's a reason US MD schools don't want you, the smart thing to do is own it and fix it. The stupid thing to do is to run off to a foreign country because they have low standards.
Eh, you cant always fix shortcomings for US MD schools. US MD schools are extremely strict about everything, and ask for a lot. You pretty much need a 31 MCAT/3.7 gpa/great EC's/great LOR's etc to stand a reasonable chance at US MD.

OP should go DO though if he can since they are more forgiving.
 

el_duderino

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Eh, you cant always fix shortcomings for US MD schools. US MD schools are extremely strict about everything, and ask for a lot. You pretty much need a 31 MCAT/3.7 gpa/great EC's/great LOR's etc to stand a reasonable chance at US MD.

OP should go DO though if he can since they are more forgiving.
Yeah, I should have just said US schools (or US medical schools). I edited the post.
 

mimelim

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Eh, you cant always fix shortcomings for US MD schools. US MD schools are extremely strict about everything, and ask for a lot. You pretty much need a 31 MCAT/3.7 gpa/great EC's/great LOR's etc to stand a reasonable chance at US MD.

OP should go DO though if he can since they are more forgiving.
If we are talking about white applicants only...

51,747 applicants in the last two years
23,758 applicants were accepted in a US MD school
12,843 applicants had either an MCAT lower than 31 or a gpa lower 3.7 (That is more than half)
5,354 applicants had BOTH MCAT lower than 31 AND a gpa lower than 3.7 (roughly a quarter)

It is categorically false that you "pretty much need a 31 MCAT/3.7 gpa etc". This is why direct numbers are necessary.

https://www.aamc.org/data/facts/applicantmatriculant/157998/mcat-gpa-grid-by-selected-race-ethnicity.html
 

GrapesofRath

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Eh, you cant always fix shortcomings for US MD schools. US MD schools are extremely strict about everything, and ask for a lot. You pretty much need a 31 MCAT/3.7 gpa/great EC's/great LOR's etc to stand a reasonable chance at US MD.

OP should go DO though if he can since they are more forgiving.
Uh no.
 

Gandyy

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If we are talking about white applicants only...

51,747 applicants in the last two years
23,758 applicants were accepted in a US MD school
12,843 applicants had either an MCAT lower than 31 or a gpa lower 3.7 (That is more than half)
5,354 applicants had BOTH MCAT lower than 31 AND a gpa lower than 3.7 (roughly a quarter)

It is categorically false that you "pretty much need a 31 MCAT/3.7 gpa etc". This is why direct numbers are necessary.

https://www.aamc.org/data/facts/applicantmatriculant/157998/mcat-gpa-grid-by-selected-race-ethnicity.html


Ok well perhaps my statement was a bit of a hyperbole. But still, you cant be too far from a 31 MCAT/3.7/Great EC's/Great LORs to get into a US MD.

Either way, its good news for me @mimelim becuase my MCAT is hurting.
 

GrapesofRath

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Ok well perhaps my statement was a bit of a hyperbole. But still, you cant be too far from a 31 MCAT/3.7/Great EC's/Great LORs to get into a US MD.

Either way, its good news for me @mimelim becuase my MCAT is hurting.
Rather than get into some huge thing about "what specific stats constitute a good chance of admission" and "oh you don't have a good chance with say a 29" the key thing to focus on is what the original point is. Grade repair exists. SMPs exist. MCAT re-take opportunities exist. People can fix their applications and make themselves viable candidates for medical schools in the US. Foreign medical schools should never be your choice if you want to practice in the US.
 
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I'm a 4th year undergraduate in UC Berkeley anticipated to go get my B.A. in Integrative Biology. I have not taken the MCAT and I do not have the competitive GPA for MD programs here in the U.S. and lately I've been pondering about studying medicine in the Philippines and coming back for the residency
Below is a list of reasons why I've been considering studying there:
  1. low-cost to live and study. Tuition there is roughly the same as the in-state tuition for undergraduates at UC schools (~$13,000/year)
  2. U.S. curriculum - classes are taught in english
  3. Philippine medical schools have U.S. affiliations. Medical students can take their 4th year clinical rotation in the U.S. affiliated hospitals
  4. You can take your USMLE step 1 and 2 while being a med school student there
  5. It will be an amazing learning experience to live in a tropical country with stark differences in various geographical locations within the country (culture wise)
  6. Personal opinion: it's a financially more strategic to study in the Philippines because I will get out of medical school low in student debt or debt free
On the other hand there are still downsides of studying abroad when my ultimate goal is to practice medicine here in the U.S.
  1. Residency matching is much more competitive for IMG, whether they are U.S. Citizens or not ( I am a U.S. Citizen)
  2. 5th year clinical will most likely be needed as the clinical hours that med schools in the Philippines provide is not sufficient for the hours required for residency matching
  3. I will have to acculturate myself to this new and different society.

Ultimately, I want to practice medicine in both countries but still live in the U.S.. Lately I have been internalizing all these thoughts, and I would like to hear your thoughts about studying in the Philippines and have a discussion about this.

Thanks!
Philippines is not a first-world country. How are you sure that their medical curriculum is on par with the US?
 

Gandyy

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Rather than get into some huge thing about "what specific stats constitute a good chance of admission" and "oh you don't have a good chance with say a 29" the key thing to focus on is what the original point is. Grade repair exists. SMPs exist. MCAT re-take opportunities exist. People can fix their applications and make themselves viable candidates for medical schools in the US. Foreign medical schools should never be your choice if you want to practice in the US.
True, but its still much harder to overcome your shortcomings for US MD schools either way. The main point of my post was that the OP should apply DO. Everyone says "just kill the MCAT" or "Get a 3.8+ in a SMP". What SDN culture has a hard time understanding is that most people cant just "Kill the MCAT" or "Get a 3.8 in a MD SMP". Not everyone can just study a lot more and get a 35 MCAT score.

It is much worse for someone to only gun for the US MD degree and spend so much time and money into attempting to "Kill the MCAT" and obtain a "3.8 in a SMP" only to not succeed. Also only DO schools allow grade replacement. MD schools just average your gpas which really doesnt help much.

DO schools are much more forgiving and I advise OP to not go to a foreign MD school and apply DO. DO is a much much better option than foreign MD is. OP can try for US MD but its hard when you have prior shortcomings.
 
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el_duderino

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Ok well perhaps my statement was a bit of a hyperbole. But still, you cant be too far from a 31 MCAT/3.7/Great EC's/Great LORs to get into a US MD.
lol
 

Gandyy

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I dont understand whats so funny about that. a 31/3.69 is the average so yes obviously according to the data mimelim has posted, you can get in, but you still cant have stats too far from the averages. Thats the whole point of an average.
 

el_duderino

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Telling OP to "apply DO" is nonsensical at this point, considering we know literally nothing about his app. We don't know his GPA, he hasn't taken the MCAT, we know nothing about his ECs. Applying DO now, or even next year, might be 100% hopeless.

I dont understand whats so funny about that. a 31/3.69 is the average so yes obviously according to the data mimelim has posted, you can get in, but you still cant have stats too far from the averages. Thats the whole point of an average.
It's the average, but that doesn't mean you can't be far off one (or even both) of those and still get in. Last year over 6,500 people got accepted with an MCAT 29 or lower. Over 1,600 got accepted with an MCAT 26 or lower. Over 6,000 were accepted with a GPA below 3.6. Hell, over 200 people were accepted with a GPA below 3.0! I was one of the ones in that last category, too. Which is why I laugh.

[edit: these numbers were for white applicants only in the 2013 and 2014 cycles.]
 
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Gandyy

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Telling OP to "apply DO" is nonsensical at this point, considering we know literally nothing about his app. We don't know his GPA, he hasn't taken the MCAT, we know nothing about his ECs. Applying DO now, or even next year, might be 100% hopeless.



It's the average, but that doesn't mean you can't be far off one (or even both) of those and still get in. Last year over 6,500 people got accepted with an MCAT 29 or lower. Over 1,600 got accepted with an MCAT 26 or lower. Over 6,000 were accepted with a GPA below 3.6. Hell, over 200 people were accepted with a GPA below 3.0! I was one of the ones in that last category, too. Which is why I laugh.

Its not non-sensical at all. Why would you not apply to a handful of DO schools in an application cycle? Its almost always a good idea to apply to a few DO schools. I'm not saying for OP to apply right now. I'm saying for OP to apply to DO schools when OP gets their application together. OP can apply to US MD schools if their application is up to par.

6500 people out of 24k applicants is approximately a 25 percent shot. Those are not good odds at all. 1600 applicants out of 24k are horrible odds and a 200 people out of 24k applicants I dont need to say much about.

Grats on getting in with less than 3.0 by the way. The rest of your app must have been incredible. Or you might have killed a SMP?
 

StudyLater

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Wow, the only countries with a match rate significantly north of 50% seem to be Israel and Grenada.
Wtf Grenada??? **** man you'd never think it...

Another factor that's holding me back to go to medical school here is the cost - the fact that on average, a medical student debt is over $175,000 and if I choose to go to post bac it would be another financial burden for me. I know I want to be a physician, but the institution has placed a great burden to the not-so-privileged individuals (like me). Inevitably the reality is, medicine IS about money too.
Get loans, like every other person that can't magically conjure up $200k. Barely anyone is that privileged anyway.

If we are talking about white applicants only...

51,747 applicants in the last two years
23,758 applicants were accepted in a US MD school
12,843 applicants had either an MCAT lower than 31 or a gpa lower 3.7 (That is more than half)
5,354 applicants had BOTH MCAT lower than 31 AND a gpa lower than 3.7 (roughly a quarter)


It is categorically false that you "pretty much need a 31 MCAT/3.7 gpa etc". This is why direct numbers are necessary.

https://www.aamc.org/data/facts/applicantmatriculant/157998/mcat-gpa-grid-by-selected-race-ethnicity.html
Wondering how many of the bolded were URMs.
 

el_duderino

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Wtf Grenada??? **** man you'd never think it...
Grenada is where SGU is, I think? Looks like the nation has about a 66% match rate, give or take.

Wondering how many of the bolded were URMs.
Mimelim says this was for white applicants only.

It looks like I was looking at the wrong table above. My numbers quoted (such as 211 acceptances with a GPA <3.0) was aggregated 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 for white applicants only.

Among all applicants, aggregated 2012-2014, over 1,000 US MD applicants with GPA <3.0 were accepted to at least one program.
Among all applicants, aggregated 2012-2014, over 18,500 US MD applicants with MCAT < 30 were accepted to at least one program.
 

el_duderino

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Its not non-sensical at all. Why would you not apply to a handful of DO schools in an application cycle?
Applying to medical school, whether DO or MD, when your application is non-competitive or you are simply not prepared academically, mentally, or emotionally is a waste of time and money. Even if you do get accepted to a program, if you are not prepared for it you will likely fail and ruin your chances.

We do not know if the OP is ready for medical school, and we do not know if the OP has any hope of an acceptance to a DO program. Encouraging him to do so is poor advice in the absence of additional information.
 
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Gandyy

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Wtf Grenada??? **** man you'd never think it...



Get loans, like every other person that can't magically conjure up $200k. Barely anyone is that privileged anyway.



Wondering how many of the bolded were URMs.
You could find out by comparing the additional acceptance by race charts
 

Gandyy

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Applying to medical school, whether DO or MD, when your application is non-competitive or you are simply not prepared academically, mentally, or emotionally is a waste of time and money. Even if you do get accepted to a program, if you are not prepared for it you will likely fail and ruin your chances.

We do not know if the OP is ready for medical school, and we do not know if the OP has any hope of an acceptance to a DO program. Encouraging him to do so is poor advice in the absence of additional information.
I'm not even sure you ever read my whole post before you reply. Not sure why, but I'll go ahead and leave this here again.

"I'm not saying for OP to apply right now. I'm saying for OP to apply to DO schools when OP gets their application together. OP can apply to US MD schools if their application is up to par."


So then my point is that OP should apply when they are ready and have the best possible application.
 

el_duderino

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It seems like we're on the same page now. You don't necessarily need a 3.7/31 to get into a US MD school, and we don't know what the OP should be considering for a plan without more info.
 
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