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I need some new study methods for my science classes. What tips does anyone have for studying in general and for Gen Chem 2?
 

JDMcNugent

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Gen chem 2: Lots and lots of problems. Thats just a good tip for chemistry in general. Make sure you are sound in algebra as well. Sounds simple but you'll be doing a lot of calculations for rate laws, logarithms, etc. It's very quantitative as well as conceptual.
 
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Starry

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^ agreed. In addition:

1) Do all your homework problems if your school assigns those. If not, do as many examples as you can. This is especially important for acid-base chemistry and redox reactions.
When first approaching a problem, categorize it into a "type." Then, use this type to determine what calculations to do. For example, strong base into weak acid is worked differently from weak base into weak acid. Divide and conquer.

2) Write an outline of all the concepts. Memorize. Example: What does solubility depend on? 1) Polar/nonpolar solvent and solute, 2) hydrophilic vs hydrophobic, 3) endothermic vs exothermic etc.
 

Back 5

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I read the chapters and did every single problem at the end, to get a better understanding of Gen Chem. Organic, same thing...but I loved Organic Chem. Gen Chem, eh, not my cup of tea.
 

Beandog

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Gen chem is so math-heavy. A solid understanding of algebra and multiple, repeated problems can get you through.
 

Dark Ace

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See if you can get your hands on a solutions manual to help you when practicing. Sometimes the instructor has one reserved for students. Focus on the homework and example problems though.

The advice I got from my professor was to do an example problem, and then aim to reproduce it multiple times without looking at the key. Memorization is NOT the goal, but the idea is that memorization can induce understanding.

GL, you can do it!
 
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I need some new study methods for my science classes. What tips does anyone have for studying in general and for Gen Chem 2?
As a Chemistry major having to finish up general chemistry this semester, my best advice to you would be to make flashcards with concepts and formulas on them and review them everyday . The most important to understand in chemistry is the cocepts and to find a way to make everything connect with each other . That way the problems involving calculations will be easier since you will be able to recognize whether your answer is right or wrong. Do all assigned homeworks and don't be afraid to seek help from either your professor or classmates.
 

TXKnight

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An OP above mentioned gen chem 2 is math heavy, but I disagree with this, I mean you have to do some math but nothing too bad at all, logs ,exponents and stuff like that is the worst. My advise: do not only learn the concept, understand it deeply and practice lots of problems, practice a little more and then.....practice some more.
 

stlrams22

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An OP above mentioned gen chem 2 is math heavy, but I disagree with this, I mean you have to do some math but nothing too bad at all, logs ,exponents and stuff like that is the worst. My advise: do not only learn the concept, understand it deeply and practice lots of problems, practice a little more and then.....practice some more.
Yep.....don't view gen chem ii as math heavy. Learn the concepts first and the calculations will be easy. You should fully understand why you are doing each calculation. Don't just memorize algorithms to get answers.
 
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Major

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^ agreed. In addition:

1) Do all your homework problems if your school assigns those. If not, do as many examples as you can. This is especially important for acid-base chemistry and redox reactions.
When first approaching a problem, categorize it into a "type." Then, use this type to determine what calculations to do. For example, strong base into weak acid is worked differently from weak base into weak acid. Divide and conquer.

2) Write an outline of all the concepts. Memorize. Example: What does solubility depend on? 1) Polar/nonpolar solvent and solute, 2) hydrophilic vs hydrophobic, 3) endothermic vs exothermic etc.
.
 

Hailstorm

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Focus on getting a conceptual understanding and being able to apply and utilize information that you are already familiar with. If you just try to memorize everything without understanding/thinking/applying it you're going to pay dearly in organic.

Specifically: conceptually master the difference/relationships between enthalpy, entropy, spontaneity, rate, and temperature dependence. Understand that these govern all reactions and think about how ions are solvated for example.

Brush up on your log/ln algebra if necessary, understand why the denominator is "ignored" when dealing with pure liquids/solids. Ka Kb Ksp Keq K vs Q etc. are all the same mechanically. Know that K is different than k.

Finally, when you're answering problems think. Breaking bonds/attractive forces requires the input of energy, forming bonds/attractive forces necessitates the release of energy.
 
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Major

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Also give chad's videos a try.
 
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Lots of great advice in this thread. I'm just finishing up gc2 so I'll echo others with both general advice and subject specific advice:

General advice:
- read each chapter before class and do book problems & in-chapter concept checks for each section of the the chapter. It takes a whole day of studying, but it's so worth it! Mark the problems that give you trouble with a highlighter so you can redo them & focus on weak areas when studying for exams

- my chem prof gives great lectures and lectures notes. I rewrite these the day before class to be ready for the quizzes, which are based on the previous week's lectures

- redo all past quizzes before exams

- ask the prof if they will give out past exams as study material -- this is gold! Or even for practice questions similar to the exam format

Subject specific advice:

- Le chatelier's principle comes up throughout the entire semester. Learn this well in the beginning so later concepts are easier

- overall, I find gc2 more concept-heavy than gc1, on which I got by on algebra skills. Make sure you understand why the math is doing what it does

- acid base equilibria. Refresh on the basics of acids and bases from chem 1 (I.e. Common strong acids and strong bases, solubility rules) this will help you on gc 2 where there is a lot of talk about solubility and acids and bases will be all over the place

Good luck :)

Edit to add:

SOLUTIONS MANUAL. Saves you so much time and heartache.
 
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Dreamstoo

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Gen chem 2: Lots and lots of problems. Thats just a good tip for chemistry in general. Make sure you are sound in algebra as well. Sounds simple but you'll be doing a lot of calculations for rate laws, logarithms, etc. It's very quantitative as well as conceptual.
This x 100. My Chem 2 final was a lot of problems that he told the class to look at. In the end, he put a lot of those questions on the final and most of us didn't finish.