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Technology Transition from a Mac to a PC...how hard is it?

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ocwaveoc

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Hey guys,
I know most med schools use PCs. Although I've considered using my Mac Powerbook G4 with Boot camp to run Windows XP, I just didn't want to chance it and have problems with compatibility. So, I'm likely going to get a PC laptop.

For those of you who's made the change from a Mac to a PC, how hard was the transition? I never use PCs and am a bit scared!:scared::scared::scared:
 

seraph524

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Haha, I guess I'll ask a similar question...how hard is it to go from PC to Mac? I'm thinking of getting a Mac for medical school because they are so sexy...


In response to above, a PC is really easy to use...a lot is pretty self-explanatory.
 

hrw212

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Hey guys,
I know most med schools use PCs. Although I've considered using my Mac Powerbook G4 with Boot camp to run Windows XP, I just didn't want to chance it and have problems with compatibility. So, I'm likely going to get a PC laptop.

For those of you who's made the change from a Mac to a PC, how hard was the transition? I never use PCs and am a bit scared!:scared::scared::scared:

First of all if you have a G4 you can't run bootcamp. You have to have a intel processor.

I'd just get a new mac and do bootcamp b/c bootcamp is not emulation, its running windows natively just as if you had a pc.

hope that helps
 

etf

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in making the transition from a mac to a pc, one only has to remember 3 words: control, alt, delete.
 

Piyush

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iin addition to clt alt del, you can also cold boot: press the power button on the processor or laptop for a few seconds till you hear the whole thing shut off...some times windows messes up so bad that even clt alt del does not work
 

GoldShadow

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Mac to PC is probably more difficult a transition than PC to Mac, but well worth it.

This is evidenced by the mathematical inequality:

PC >>> Mac
 

copingmethods

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Mac to PC is probably more difficult a transition than PC to Mac, but well worth it.

This is evidenced by the mathematical inequality:

PC >>> Mac

I think you made a calculation error somewhere. ;)
 

clab1707

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Haha, I guess I'll ask a similar question...how hard is it to go from PC to Mac? I'm thinking of getting a Mac for medical school because they are so sexy...

Any mac lovers out there who can convince seraph and I? I'm just looking for an excuse to buy a mac before Fall 2008
 

nick_carraway

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Any mac lovers out there who can convince seraph and I? I'm just looking for an excuse to buy a mac before Fall 2008
The cost is the only negative. If you can get past that, you really don't need any more convincing.

I've been using Macs most of my life and since I got to college, I've been using Mac laptops with a Windows desktop. I'd use a Mac for everything if I wasn't into gaming. That being said, running Windows on a Mac Pro for gaming isn't an issue but how many pre-meds/med students are willing to drop that kind of cash is debatable.

For ease of use, I'd get a Mac. Apple's proprietary nature--while sometimes restrictive--also means that hardware + software work together with fewer unexpected problems than a Windows machine. Once you start using it, you pick it up pretty quickly and you won't be missing Windows once you switch over.

I would, however, buy your Mac at a third-party store with a generous return policy like Fry's. Apple's retail customer support isn't the greatest and the last thing you want to deal with is a condescending manager/genius at the Apple store when you could've just gotten a return/exchange at your local electronics retailer.
 

Auron

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As a student it won't matter what you use, its just personal preference. I have always used a PC and I've never had any problems. For your purposes, what do you really benefit from using a mac? It just looks nice, and "easier to use" (I lol at this because if you think using a PC is hard to use in any shape or form then I feel sorry for you). Angry little Mac fanboys just hype BS about PC's, it's rather irritating. You can get a decent laptop that uses windows for $600 that will do everything you want (except perhaps, hardcore gaming). So why spend the Apple premium? - because Apple fanboys would give their right kidney to steve jobs.

OP, don't worry about getting used to PC, it's easy.
 

RoadRunner17

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MacOS is a way better operating system than Windows.. for the various reasons (better integration, Linux core, not as prevalent as Windows, etc). Ultimately though, they're all ripoffs of various Linux OS features. On the pecking order:

Certain Linux OS's > MacOS > Windows

Gotta love Microsoft's innovation. Oh wait...

Regardless, if you want an Apple badly enough, you can buy them refurbished. They have the same warranty as a brand new Apple, and run as much as 20% less. I don't think I'd ever buy a brand new Apple though.. the hardware is just damned expensive compared to PC clones (as Auron just mentioned).
 

sylus

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(Both to the OP and the person asking about Macs :))

Mac has pretty much worked to make Macs compatible with PCs, I'm not sure what kind of compatibility you need other than Microsoft Office documents (which is available for Macs, obviously)? Windows runs exactly like it would on a PC, there is even Parallels in which you can run Windows while also remaining in Mac OS X. Macs are also way less maintenance- if you get one definitely get AppleCare, it's pretty cheap for students and if anything at all is wrong with your computer, you can just bring it to an Apple Store or send it in and it gets fixed for free. A friend of mine actually got a brand new one because they couldn't fix his. You don't have to waste your space with anti-virus, adware, etc etc because it's a nonissue on Macs. PCs tend to slow down but Macs pretty much keep their speed constant. You can do pretty much everything on a Mac that you can on a PC, in fact at the moment I can't think of anything that you can't do. The price is the downside but think of it as the Mac being kind of the Prada of computer technology- it's more expensive, but it's high quality. And yes, they are easy to use- it takes a quick minute to get used to it and then it's easy riding. PCs are not hard to use either, but Macs are simpler and easier. I've used both Macs and PCs throughout my life and most of the times my computer made me want to bang my head into a wall, it was a PC. (If only I was this motivated to write an essay about the civil war... :oops:)
 

docbens

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I think half of my medical school class if not more has macs. I don't see any reason for you to change if you like your set up now. As far as a learning curve goes, I have used a PC forever (dad works at HP), one summer I used a mac doing research (had a hippie as a PI), when the summer was over went back to the PC. For all intensive purposes they are exactly the same. Honstly I can not tell a difference, though sometimes I can't figure out what happened to my right mouse button when I am using a mac ;)
 
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alwaysaangel

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If you don't need a new computer right this instant then just wait until you know where you're going. Then contact some of the students that are already at your future school of medicine and find out if a Mac is an issue.

A mac is not an issue at all for me at my school - the only thing I need Windows for is the netters CD histotime (a CD we use to study histology) and thats not really a necessity. I just use parallels on my macbook pro.

For those considering changing to mac and not convinced yet - I recently did the change over so maybe I can do some convincing.

I love my mac. I used PCs all my life and frankly I just got tired of them being unreliable. My PC always managed to crash like a week before finals. From the time I bought it I had to reformat the harddrive every 6 months or so because Windows got so bad nothing else would work (and I'm not computer illiterate I know how to keep it clean of viruses and spam and it would still screw up).

My mac had one problem the first week I had it - which was a software thing involving the airport (wirless card) - they fixed it and I haven't had a problem since.

Its fast, I can watch a show I downloaded off my harddrive, look at Netters CD in parallels, have several SDN tabs open in my mozilla, while talking to my bf on skype with my calendar and neooffice open in the background to work with. I could have never done that with my PC - it always got confused.

Macs have enormous variability. Not in the hardware - so if you're a true comp geek and want to upgrade your harddrive then a mac isn't for you. But its EXTREMELY versatile in software. There are a lot of very smart, very loyal people who make free ware for macs. In fact there is a whole site full of it: freemacware.com I got a program that let me put notes on my pdf lectures for class (something that you can't do with a PC - or no one in my class could find a way to), I have a program that put a collage of pictures as my desktop, I have one that will search out and crack wireless networks (not something I do often - I only use it when I'm home and the only internet I have is wireless), there are millions of these out there. Windows has some - but not to the same magnitude or degree of variability.

Macs are intuitive. PCs you know because you're used to - but once you start using a mac - it just makes good sense. It really is the computer for idiots - but hell whats wrong with that - I want a computer thats easy to use.

Macs last forever. My bf did not in anyway baby is powerbook - he's actually quite hard on it (takes it everywhere, leaves it on the floor, on the bed [bad for overheating]) and it is in its 5th year and still going strong. Unlike my 4 year old PC that barely worked last year his was still running strong and fast.

Macs are fun. Into music, photos, videos or making your own website? Your mac comes with some awesome software that makes all of that very easy.

Miss your PC? Get bootcamp (will come with your new Mac with Leopard) or buy parallels. Then you can have your windows.

Don't want to pay for microsoft office? Get NeoOffice - almost identical -I've been using them for months and there was only 1 thing I wanted to do that I couldn't figure out how to do with Neooffice (putting a break in a word document and changing the orientation of just one page from portrait to landscape). Everything else is almost identical to Microsoft Office and its completely free and completely compatible so long as you just remember to save it in .doc format.

So fewer problems, more options, and I think they look nice. I love my macbook pro - I've had it since June and its still my favorite toy.

Also, if you wait til' June (since most of you probably don't need a new computer til' just before school anyway) sometime in early June they should not only update either macbooks or macbook pros but they will also start the ipod back to school deal. Buy a computer get an ipod (and usually if you want a printer too) for free. I got a nano and gave it to my mom. Its a good deal if you have the patience to wait.
 

seraph524

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Oh, and in response to all the Mac lovers out there...Macs do crash. My PI's Mac crashes every once in a while (once every couple of days)... And don't say he doesn't know how to use it - he's been a Mac person for over a decade now.
 
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Macs do crash a whole lot, so I won't be having any of that BS. I'm running both in my room right now and I use my PC a lot more. I use my mac mainly to watch movies cause everything looks so badass on it. There is one reason and one reason only for me to switch to a Macbook... Air.
 

se2131

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In my experience, MacOS crashes a LOT more often than windows. In fact, I can count the number of times that I've seen a BSOD on one hand.

Macs proved good to me for only one reason: they got me in the habit of saving my documents every 30 seconds. And this was on a (at-the-time) top of the line system (G3 or G4, can't remember which one) back in high school.

Frankly though, I hate both of them. Using a Linux distribution now which has been much nicer and simpler to use (once you get past the learning curve of course). I'm not recommending Linux for the average med student, but I'm just showing that I'm far from being a windows fanboy.

And BTW, for all you mac fanboys who think that Microsoft is the devil and decide to choose Macintosh on purely "ideological" reasons, open your eyes and see that Apple is much worse, especially by the way that you're essentially locked into their products.
 

alwaysaangel

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Oh, and in response to all the Mac lovers out there...Macs do crash. My PI's Mac crashes every once in a while (once every couple of days)... And don't say he doesn't know how to use it - he's been a Mac person for over a decade now.

Everything crashes. Mine hasn't on me yet but its only 6 months old.

The Kernel base of OS X is more stable than what Microsoft uses. Thats just a fact. So they crash less.

This may stop being true now that Microsoft has switched to a similar base for vista - but frankly with all the security crap on there its not worth it and I'll still take my mac over vista.
 

nick_carraway

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Oh, and in response to all the Mac lovers out there...Macs do crash. My PI's Mac crashes every once in a while (once every couple of days)... And don't say he doesn't know how to use it - he's been a Mac person for over a decade now.
I agree. Macs do crash. Office was a particular problem on Intel Macs before Office 2008 was released.

The difference is that software is designed to work well with the Mac due to Apple's proprietary philosophy. A lot of software is produced in-house and their engineers spend a long time ensuring that the vendors they use supply hardware that won't be an issue.

The problem with Windows computers--as evidenced by the release of new OSes this past year--is that there are too many developers who don't talk to each other in the Windows world.

When I wanted to try out Vista, I had to think about the next two weeks. Do I have any games I want to play? Do I have any deadlines I'll be running up against? Do I have time to troubleshoot? Is my data backed up?

When I wanted to install Leopard, however, I started the installation and booted into the new OS. I played with it, admired it, and haven't had any problems with it.

Vista, on the other hand, had audio driver issues, had wireless adapter driver issues, had an issue that was my fault regarding one of my HDs which cost my 500 GB of data. Sure, some improvements were nice and SP1-RC1 solved a lot of the issues but not all of them. A buggy wireless adapter driver was a deal-breaker for me and so I downgraded.

When you use a Mac, however, everything is going in the right direction. You appreciate its changes because many of them make your life a little bit easier. When you use a Windows machine, despite how much you might love it, you do sometimes wonder WTF developers were thinking.
 

ocwaveoc

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IC. If I were to run Bootcamp on a Mac, I'll need to buy another Mac which means I'll have to spend minimum of $800 - $900 even after back to school discounts (by the way, can med students get this? Do the stores just ask for the student ID?). I do have a couple of questions after reading your postings.

1) What is a parallel and how does it work?
2) If one uses a tablet to take notes directly on the pwr points, how small can you write. I mean, can you write as if you are writing with a normal pen?
3) In med school, what applications/software should you know how to use? In other words, in what capacity/for what type of stuff are the computers for (aside from downloading PDF, watching lectures/listening to lectures)?

thanks.
 

Mr. Freeze

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of course YMMV, but the only things I've had issues with as a Mac user have been watching some WMV videos during anatomy and my inability to speed them up. That was pretty much it, and probably could have been worked around. But I wasn't that into the vids anyway, and could just watch them either on my desktop or at the school the day of the practical when I was there anyway.

Some of the powerpoints that I've tried to open have locked up PowerPoint, I think because they were made with later versions of PPT than Office 2004 could handle. Office 2008 would likely solve this, but 2004 was $5 while I was in ugrad. You can get NeoOffice or another freeware reader and solve this.

Pretty much all you'll need is Office or another way to read Excel and Word docs. You already get Preview for reading/saving PDF's, but I like Skim, which lets you annotate more and search easier. Oh and iFlash, a pretty kickass flashcard app. Maybe Audacity for re-tempo'ing mp3s of lectures to save to your iPod that you'll get for free this summer when you buy a new Mac.

And software locking up ≠ crashing. I don't know anyone with a Mac that had to go to IT and get help. I can think of 5 out of the 16 I see regularly that did, a ratio I'm sure is indicative of the rest of the class...
 

Doublecortin

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Hey guys,
I know most med schools use PCs. Although I've considered using my Mac Powerbook G4 with Boot camp to run Windows XP, I just didn't want to chance it and have problems with compatibility. So, I'm likely going to get a PC laptop.

For those of you who's made the change from a Mac to a PC, how hard was the transition? I never use PCs and am a bit scared!:scared::scared::scared:
the fact that you took the pains to start this thread demonstrates that you will have a great deal of trouble. cheers
 
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ocwaveoc

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First of all if you have a G4 you can't run bootcamp. You have to have a intel processor.

I'd just get a new mac and do bootcamp b/c bootcamp is not emulation, its running windows natively just as if you had a pc.

hope that helps

Thanks for your posting. I had no idea that without the new intel chip I can't run Bootcamp.

Also, if what you are saying is true about boot camp being native, I may just get a mac....hmm...decisions.
 

ocwaveoc

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As a student it won't matter what you use, its just personal preference. I have always used a PC and I've never had any problems. For your purposes, what do you really benefit from using a mac? It just looks nice, and "easier to use" (I lol at this because if you think using a PC is hard to use in any shape or form then I feel sorry for you). Angry little Mac fanboys just hype BS about PC's, it's rather irritating. You can get a decent laptop that uses windows for $600 that will do everything you want (except perhaps, hardcore gaming). So why spend the Apple premium? - because Apple fanboys would give their right kidney to steve jobs.

OP, don't worry about getting used to PC, it's easy.

A valid point!
Perhaps I'll just get a PC laptop and keep my old Mac G4 powerbook.
Hmmm...again decisions!
 

TheLesPaul

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As a student it won't matter what you use, its just personal preference. I have always used a PC and I've never had any problems. For your purposes, what do you really benefit from using a mac? It just looks nice, and "easier to use" (I lol at this because if you think using a PC is hard to use in any shape or form then I feel sorry for you). Angry little Mac fanboys just hype BS about PC's, it's rather irritating. You can get a decent laptop that uses windows for $600 that will do everything you want (except perhaps, hardcore gaming). So why spend the Apple premium? - because Apple fanboys would give their right kidney to steve jobs.

OP, don't worry about getting used to PC, it's easy.
I'm sorry, but so many people say this without any clue of what they are talking about. A comparable PC will be approximately equivalent in cost (and often more) than the Mac. Numerous comparisons have been done (http://www.macworld.com/article/52381/2006/08/macproprice.html - list with comparisons on the desktop, laptop, and professional laptop tiers) that show that they price points are very competitive. Do your research first.
 

darkraven

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It depends on what you want your laptop to do but i'ld suggest a macbook. I had a pc laptop for 4 years and it was complete crap compared to my macbook that i bought 6 months ago. As far as price, macbooks are getting fairly competitive now with pc's. Asthetically, mac wins no doubt. ppl have talked about mac's being easier and they are! You don't 'uninstall' programs, you just drag to a trashcan. And btw, Vista totally blows, its very inefficient compared to mac, the mac OS was designed very very nicely. My friend has vista and hates it, it takes up half of his ram and he's considering buying 4gig's just so he can run some of his more ram-requiring programs. Also a big plus is no viruses (yet ... i suppose). Another great feature is batterlife, I easily 4.5 hours, and can push it to 5+ with certain settings. My friends' pc drop out after 1.5-2. I also love the touch pad which takes a little getting used to but becomes far more efficient with 2 finger scrolling and the massive pad (pc pads are much smaller normally).

I'ld say the downsides to mac is that if your a gamer, you're gonna be dissappointed. If you want to upgrade stuff, pc's the way to go, altho most ppl don't upgrade laptops too much except for ram, which is very very easy on a macbook btw. Also some programs just aren't made well for mac, like msn or utorrent, thus i use a 3rd party client (adium and azureus). Their not as good as their counterparts which is slightly annoying but not really bad. For that wmv thing, i'm pretty sure you'ld be able to play it with VLC medica player with should be the standard player on everyone's comp no matter-what OS.

lol, last point is that mac comes with a ton of 'fun' programs built-in like imovieHD, comic book life (easy comic book maker), garage band (which is nice for making audioclips or songs).


anyways, get a mac, it rocks!
 

bluesTank

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If you want a gimmicky computer and like to make photo albums or movies then get a Mac.

If you want to do anything else well, get a PC.

We have both a PC and mac in our lab, both recent models and almost everyone here cannot stand the mac. It gets so frustrating when you are trying to do anything useful for work.
 

SBBunny

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I'm sorry, but so many people say this without any clue of what they are talking about. A comparable PC will be approximately equivalent in cost (and often more) than the Mac. Numerous comparisons have been done (http://www.macworld.com/article/52381/2006/08/macproprice.html - list with comparisons on the desktop, laptop, and professional laptop tiers) that show that they price points are very competitive. Do your research first.

I'm not so sure that Macworld is a good source for unbiased information comparing Macs to PCs. Skepticism aside, it's a good article with convincing evidence against the argument that Macs are overpriced.

I'm wondering if it's worth it to pay a lot of money to get a really beefed up system. PC laptops just don't seem to work too well for me. I've been doing well with a $500 Toshiba laptop... until the battery stopped working. The particular model and series that I have is known for battery issues, but my specific serial number is apparently not covered by Toshiba's massive recall. I can't leave it unplugged for more than 45 seconds before it goes into standby mode. My previous laptop started literally falling apart after three years (and after my ex-boyfriend accidentally spilled half of a venti latte on my keyboard :mad:). The computer's power button was broken, so I had to shove a pen inside the case to turn it on. I left it in standby mode instead of turning it off because it would often require more than five attempts to turn on. Naturally, the biggest problems started about a week before my final exams.

I'm hoping that a Mac will bring better luck, but I kind of don't want to blow >$2000 on a computer if it'll just end up dying on me. Also, I've heard AWFUL, AWFUL, AWFUL things about Vista.
 

southerndoc

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If you want a gimmicky computer and like to make photo albums or movies then get a Mac.

If you want to do anything else well, get a PC.

We have both a PC and mac in our lab, both recent models and almost everyone here cannot stand the mac. It gets so frustrating when you are trying to do anything useful for work.
What kind of work are you doing that cannot be done on a Mac? If it's proprietary software written only for Windows, then that can easily be solved by installing Windows on the Mac (remember, Intel-based Macs can run both Windows and Mac OS X natively). It's a simple thing to install it through Boot Camp, or if you want to run both operating systems at the same time, you can install it through programs like Parallels Desktop.

If by work you mean word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, email, internet, etc., then most programs (including Microsoft Office) are available for Mac OS X.

For most people that do and do not need to do actual work on their computer at home, they will find the Mac is perfectly capable of doing both.


Regarding stability on Macs and Macs crashing: I have talked to very few people who have experienced a crash on their Mac. By crash I mean a lockup (equivalent to the Blue Screen of Death on PC's) or some other reason that requires you to turn off the computer.

A SOFTWARE crash does happen from time to time (with me, it's particularly a problem with Safari).

The difference is that Macs were designed so one crashing application doesn't corrupt the entire operating system, thereby causing a lockup and forcing a restart. Windows Me would cause the computer to crash when software programs went awry. Windows XP improved this, but it was still a big enough problem with my old PC that I became annoyed with it. I have no idea how stable Windows Vista is, but judging from the reviews of people who hate Windows Vista, it may be more of a problem besides its stability. One of my friends recently wiped his hard drive clean and reinstalled Windows XP after growing tired of Vista.
 

southerndoc

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I'm not so sure that Macworld is a good source for unbiased information comparing Macs to PCs. Skepticism aside, it's a good article with convincing evidence against the argument that Macs are overpriced.

How about some other sources?

http://www.linuxinsider.com/story/36120.html
http://www.computerworld.com/action...ticleId=9023959&taxonomyId=123&intsrc=kc_feat

Macs are expensive, but by the time you factor in software included (iPhoto, iMovie), webcam, etc., it is often found that the Mac is cheaper when similarly equipped PC's are priced.

Even though the prices are similar when things are equipped similarly, Macs usually have high-end products in them, which not every consumer needs. I will always say that Apple products are not for the poor!
 

The Janitor

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I will always say that Apple products are not for the poor!

I dunno...you could get a new MacBook for what the average smoker spends on cigarettes in a year.

Plus, there's always eBay.
 
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TMP-SMX

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I dunno...you could get a new MacBook for what the average smoker spends on cigarettes in a year.

Plus, there's always eBay.

I'm not sure what you mean. Have you seen the price for Macs on eBay? I guess it is a plus too if you want to sell it.

Flip4Mac and Quicktime is superior for watching streaming WMVs than WMP on Windows.
 

TMP-SMX

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There are plenty of suckers on eBay. That doesn't mean there aren't deals to be had.

There's a chance of stolen goods too so you have to keep that in mind. For most of us that are students it makes more sense to buy the latest new computer with the student discount or to buy a refurbished computer straight from apple. Piece of mind is important too.
 

The Janitor

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I can vouch for Apple's refurbs. A good deal, usually.

As for eBay, it goes without saying that you need to pay attention to who you're buying from, and what you're buying.
 

blankguy

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Get a Macbook or Macbook pro. You can't possibly go wrong with either one since they can run windows. The only caveat is you need to buy a copy of windows. I've used both Macs and PCs so I am a bit ambidextrous in computing terms. I'd say bootcamp largely defeats the purpose of transitioning from Mac to PCs
 

blankguy

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Haha, I guess I'll ask a similar question...how hard is it to go from PC to Mac? I'm thinking of getting a Mac for medical school because they are so sexy...


In response to above, a PC is really easy to use...a lot is pretty self-explanatory.

Unfortunately their problems are not quite self explanatory. :thumbdown:
 

mustangsally65

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This could just be my personal perspective, but the simplest way I tend to describe Macs vs. PCs is that Windows tends to make you do four or five more steps to accomplish the same goal that a Mac lets you do in one or two steps. And the terminology in the Mac OS has always made more sense to me than that of Windows.

A few examples: to restart your PC, you go down to the "Start" menu in the bottom left of the screen. you click and go up to the "shut down" thing. Then you get a box that asks what you want to do, and you pull down to the "restart" word. It might ask if you're sure after you click okay, I can't remember. Then it restarts.

On a Mac, I go to the Apple menu and click Restart. I don't have to have prior knowledge of where the restart function is, I can just click on each of the menus and read what's under them if I forget where it is or if I'm new to Macs. So much simpler.

Most PC users store things in "My Computer" or "My Documents." What the heck is the difference? And who can remember all those drives with letters for names? Even in 1995 when I put a floppy disk in my Mac it mounted on the desktop with an icon that looked like a square floppy disk, with whatever I'd named the disk (or Untitled if it was new). If I put in a CD, the icon that came up on the desktop was a round shape that was unmistakable for being a CD. When I want to save something, I find the word that says what the type of media is: Hard Disk, Desktop, the name I've titled a CD or flash drive etc. I could never figure out why there was an A drive (Floppies, I think?) and a C drive for the hard drive, but where the heck was the B drive?

I used to go to my school's computer lab and rebuild the desktops on the Macs that people had crashed when no PCs were available to use so they HAD to use a Mac. No one understands that when you click the upper corner of the window on a Mac, the application doesn't quit. It just closes the window. The application is still open, and the memory would be fragmented on the computers because no one ever quit applications, they just closed the window. I miss the Rebuilding the Desktop option in OS X. Repairing Permissions just isn't the same.

But I'll admit I'm biased: when I got to middle school in 1994, my school had two computer labs: a PC lab and a Mac lab. When we used the lab in the library, we used the Mac lab. When we had our obligatory careers/computers class we used the PC lab. in 1995, my parents decided to get our first family computer, and they asked us kids what kind to get. My preference was the Macs because they were easier for me to use. We got a Mac in 1995 and I used it until I went to college in 2000 and got my own iMac.

My college required everyone to have certain kinds of software, like Office. I went for 5 years never having to buy that software because I knew how to manipulate file extensions in Clarisworks/Appleworks: everyone thinks Macs used to be SO incompatible with PCs, but you just had to know how to finagle things. And I am not computer savvy by any means, Macs just are easier to use IMHO. My little brother put a business card CD in my slot-loading iMac in 2001, and I just got a screwdriver and took it apart and removed the small CD from the CD drive, and put it all back together and it still works fine. I did replace the CD drive in that computer too, with no problems all by myself. My family's computer bought in 1995 never left our house for any type of repair, and we got internet access in 1997: it was our primary computer well into 2000, and then when I was away at college I would email my family on it, and then my mom got an iBook in 2003, but for 8 years it never had a problem that couldn't be fixed by using the software discs that came with it or simply rebuilding the desktop. Sometimes it would "bomb," but it always had a place you could click to Restart it, and even Sad Macs could be easily remedied by starting up from the Software Restore CD. And I remember dragging those Rescued Items from Hard Drive folders from the Trash. :p

I realize computers were much more simple back then, but today when I have to use a PC I honestly get really nervous. I'm afraid someone's going to tell me to do something and I won't know how to do it because I'm so unfamiliar with the machines. I can browse the internet or create files in Office, but that's about it.

Macs just make more sense to me, but I grew up with them. I think it's hard for anyone to change what they're used to, but in a different way. Mac users have to figure out that Windows takes extra steps that don't often make logical sense to perform the same actions we can do in a few clicks. PC users look at a Mac and it's so different from the drab blue and grey (no offense but it's kind of ugly!) of Windows that they don't know where to start. Not to mention the one mouse button thing, but what most PC users don't know is if we press a key and then click, we get the same menu you get with your second mouse button (I think it used to be Command, then changed to Control? shows you how much I ever need a right click button!).

There's a learning curve no matter what you do, but Macs are definitely more fun. They have always had so much more personality than PCs. I used to get alert boxes in Classic on my iMac, and if you didn't click on the options right away (like OK or Cancel) it would talk to you, and say something like "Pay Attention!" or "It's not my fault!" in a creepy computer voice. I even recorded my own Alert Sound on my iMac in 2000, which was so easy because Macs have almost always had built in speakers, microphones, etc. Well, except for the MacBookAir, which doesn't have much built in! :laugh:

But the most endearing reason to like Macs? Oregon Trail, of course! I bet all of us grew up playing that game at school, and I know I play it on Facebook today. Although some of the diseases have changed, someone in my wagon got "explosive diarrhea" the other day. ;)
 

ocwaveoc

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Get a Macbook or Macbook pro. You can't possibly go wrong with either one since they can run windows. The only caveat is you need to buy a copy of windows. I've used both Macs and PCs so I am a bit ambidextrous in computing terms. I'd say bootcamp largely defeats the purpose of transitioning from Mac to PCs

Thank you for your advice. If using Windows XP on Bootcamp is EXACTLY like using a PC and there will be no compatibility issue, I'll get a Mac.
 

Auron

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I'm sorry, but so many people say this without any clue of what they are talking about. A comparable PC will be approximately equivalent in cost (and often more) than the Mac. Numerous comparisons have been done (http://www.macworld.com/article/52381/2006/08/macproprice.html - list with comparisons on the desktop, laptop, and professional laptop tiers) that show that they price points are very competitive. Do your research first.

Macs usually cost more though, and they're a total rip off if you look at the price difference in their configurations. Pc is cheap and reliable, and everything works on it - no problems. I don't hate apple entirely - I own an ipod nano (the black all aluminum one, not the craptastic one they have out right now).
 

TMP-SMX

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Macs usually cost more though, and they're a total rip off if you look at the price difference in their configurations. Pc is cheap and reliable, and everything works on it - no problems. I don't hate apple entirely - I own an ipod nano (the black all aluminum one, not the craptastic one they have out right now).

So get the low end config and install your own components. In the Macbook it is easy to pop in more RAM and a larger HDD. Any idiot that pays apple's RAM prices should know better. Don't buy the black macbook that is more expensive for a black case and not much else.

For students they are comparable prices to most of the other high end computers. It is true that apple doesn't have any low end computers that can compete under $700, but I don't know why they would want to. With all of the extras and software they put on even the low end Macbook they can't make it much cheaper than it is. The software is probably the best thing about Apple computers. The Mac Mini isn't a good value now since it hasn't been updated in a long long time. The iMacs and Macbooks are great computers especially for college students during the summer. $100 for a printer, $200 for an iPod, and save $100 on an iMac/Macbook. Honestly though, at the moment I wouldn't buy an iMac until they are updated again. It's nice that they come with a 1 GB chip and you can easily upgrade to 2 GB, but if they came with 2 GB you wouldn't have to worry about upgrading. Plus, they should get a bit of a speed bump.

The Macbooks right now are a great buy as they were just updated this week. At 2.4/2.1 GHz, bluetooth, a webcam, or wireless n they are not low end notebook computers. The best overall is the mid range 2 GB/2.4 GHz model at the best value for 1199. The HDD sizes are larger but again if you need a very large drive at 250 GB or 320 GB I'd recommend doing it yourself. The only glaring problem is the lack of a graphics card, but if you absolutely need a graphics card then why would you want a macbook? On a 13.3 inch screen what kind of things will you be doing that require top quality graphics?
 
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deleted77919

Some thoughts from someone who has both a mac and a PC. Some professors in medical school create their power points on macs and when they are lazy about putting the images in, then the images will not display on a PC but they will on a mac. PC's just get the "Quicktime and a TIFF image decompressor are necessary to view this image" message in their place.

Office is slower on the mac. Office 2008 significantly improved things but office still runs better on my (similiarly configured) PC, esp the 100meg+ powerpoints (with the exception of the aforementioned missing images).
 

blankguy

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PC cheaper? More like you get what you pay for. You may pay less but you realize that you are more likely to have an adventure using PCs. Macs are much more simpler to use than PCs.
 

TMP-SMX

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Some thoughts from someone who has both a mac and a PC. Some professors in medical school create their power points on macs and when they are lazy about putting the images in, then the images will not display on a PC but they will on a mac. PC's just get the "Quicktime and a TIFF image decompressor are necessary to view this image" message in their place.

Office is slower on the mac. Office 2008 significantly improved things but office still runs better on my (similiarly configured) PC, esp the 100meg+ powerpoints (with the exception of the aforementioned missing images).

That's their fault. If you use the compatibility check and not use random images off the internet that will have issues then it isn't a problem at all. Plus, office will run poorly if you don't have enough RAM on any computer you use with large powerpoints.
 

blankguy

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Get a Macbook or Macbook pro. Bootcamp will do the job. If you don't want to reboot to switch operating system get something like Fusion which will allow you to run windows within Mac OS X.:thumbup:
 

Auron

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Um, yeeeeeeeah. And they say Steve Jobs has a "reality distortion field." :rolleyes:

Shouldn't you be mopping floors?

What I implied was that all the software the the typical student would use works fine on a PC, so please stfu.
 

The Janitor

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I have always used a PC and I've never had any problems.

don't worry about getting used to PC, it's easy.

Pc is cheap and reliable, and everything works on it - no problems.

Angry little Mac fanboys just hype BS about PC's

all the software the the typical student would use works fine on a PC, so please stfu.

Nice. So, what does that make you, Cosmo? An "angry little PC fanboy?" :rolleyes:
 
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