Traveling Pharmacist/ Informatics Pharmacist/ Traveling Positions with PharmD

Sep 10, 2015
26
2
Status
Pharmacy Student
It's been a while since I've seen an active thread of people talking about the idea of becoming a traveling pharmacist. Are any of you out there "Traveling Pharmacists"? Or work careers in which you travel for a company with your degree being a "PharmD"

I see a lot of part time positions for pharmacists on Indeed and other websites for part time positions in rural areas of the country.... Do you know of any of these positions being able to pay you for the travel and hotel/housing costs of any of this? I know the most difficult part of this process would be getting licensed in each state that you would have to work for.

I've read briefly that If you are an Informatics Pharmacist, that you have the ability to travel with that career. More specifically, if you are working with Epic. I've even heard of some of these positions even paying up to 100$ a hour...and that It's extremely flexible for travelers based on the idea that you can practice in other states without needing licenses from the states you work in...because technically you are not "dispensing"

Just wanted to know if anyone had any information that they would like to share dealing with this topic? Or if any of you work any of these positions and what it's like!

Thanks you all.
 

panasoniku

5+ Year Member
Jun 13, 2012
88
30
Status
Pharmacist
I've read briefly that If you are an Informatics Pharmacist, that you have the ability to travel with that career. More specifically, if you are working with Epic. I've even heard of some of these positions even paying up to 100$ a hour...and that It's extremely flexible for travelers based on the idea that you can practice in other states without needing licenses from the states you work in...because technically you are not "dispensing"
I'm in informatics. You do not need a license for each state that you fly into work. However, depending on what you are doing it is good practice to review the state's laws of the client that you will be working for. Therefore, you will understand the workflow needs. That's more for ambulatory eMAR solutions.

$100/hr haha. That if you work "independently" for a contracting company. You don't receive benefits, therefore you get higher pay. Also, there's no guarantee you will get a new contract right after you are done, so it becomes important for you to save extra money while you await your next contract. I haven't decided to dive into that yet, maybe in the future once I develop a nice piggy bank to sit on and not have to worry TOO much about having a steady paycheck.
 
OP
G
Sep 10, 2015
26
2
Status
Pharmacy Student
Most MSLs travel a lot for their work
(I just realized I replied to the wrong person. See above post)

Wow! Just checked this out. Thanks for the recommendation....this seems like an awesome type of job. Do all of the traveling positions in pharmacy basically require residencies for when you finish school?
 

tcasey

Psychiatric Pharmacy Resident
7+ Year Member
May 2, 2011
19
2
Nashville, TN
Wow! Just checked this out. Thanks for the recommendation....this seems like an awesome type of job. Do all of the traveling positions in pharmacy basically require residencies for when you finish school?
Every MSL I've met has finished either a residency or a fellowship (or both). Also depends on a ton of networking in industry.
 

rph3664

7+ Year Member
Jul 5, 2010
2,465
366
Status
Pharmacist
Indeed simply copies out of want ads. When I was job-hunting a few years ago, it didn't take me long to figure out that some of those jobs were listed 10 or 20 times - the same job.
 
OP
G
Sep 10, 2015
26
2
Status
Pharmacy Student
I'm in informatics. You do not need a license for each state that you fly into work. However, depending on what you are doing it is good practice to review the state's laws of the client that you will be working for. Therefore, you will understand the workflow needs. That's more for ambulatory eMAR solutions.

$100/hr haha. That if you work "independently" for a contracting company. You don't receive benefits, therefore you get higher pay. Also, there's no guarantee you will get a new contract right after you are done, so it becomes important for you to save extra money while you await your next contract. I haven't decided to dive into that yet, maybe in the future once I develop a nice piggy bank to sit on and not have to worry TOO much about having a steady paycheck.

How did you find your way into your position? And what would you say your job satisfaction is with this job?
 

fattunesy

Living the IT life now...
7+ Year Member
Jul 7, 2010
49
0
Chicago
Status
Pharmacist
I'm in informatics. You do not need a license for each state that you fly into work. However, depending on what you are doing it is good practice to review the state's laws of the client that you will be working for. Therefore, you will understand the workflow needs. That's more for ambulatory eMAR solutions.

$100/hr haha. That if you work "independently" for a contracting company. You don't receive benefits, therefore you get higher pay. Also, there's no guarantee you will get a new contract right after you are done, so it becomes important for you to save extra money while you await your next contract. I haven't decided to dive into that yet, maybe in the future once I develop a nice piggy bank to sit on and not have to worry TOO much about having a steady paycheck.
I'm also in informatics. This is spot on. Working as a consultant does mean travel, often to the same place for 6 months to a year or longer for the duration of an implementation. But as mentioned, you don't know when your next contract will come up. If you work for an agency it is a bit better, but you will make less. There may be benefits depending how they set up the employment. I've looked into it a bit as it is my backup in case my hopsital system removes my position after a ongoing consolidation.