UCLA Medical School in Crisis

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Are you really considering a school if a random SDN poster convinces you to drop your acceptance?
No, but unless the same user is making a bunch of other accounts claiming to be med students then I don't think it's that simple.

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kinda irrelevant kinda not. can any UCLA med students look at this and let us know if it's twitter style fear-mongering about wokeism etc.

I feel like classifying obesity as a slur is pretty ridiculous (but I also recognize the twitter people blow stuff out of proportion all the time.)

 
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I feel like classifying obesity as a slur is pretty ridiculous (but I also recognize the twitter people blow stuff out of proportion all the time.)
In the 70s, "mentally ******ed" and "mental ******ation" were common phrases found in our course catalog for special education majors. Today that are phrases never uttered in polite company. Culture shifts constantly. Sometimes it is exhausting to keep up.
 
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In the 70s, "mentally ******ed" and "mental ******ation" were common phrases found in our course catalog for special education majors. Today that are phrases never uttered in polite company. Culture shifts constantly. Sometimes it is exhausting to keep up.

Agree.

Fire ******ant is still called what is is because it’s literally what it does. And no one uses it insultingly towards others.

Kids will be mean and call each other names. Since the dawn of time it’s been that way. Developmentally delayed may be the PC term now, but after kids have been using it enough to call each other names, it’ll be considered an insult and a new name will be coined.

Eventually, like fashion, people will run out of original ideas and we’ll either use one of the outdated terms (likely no longer offensive because it’s so old no one has heard it used as an insult) or mix and match them.

Just like beards/moustaches/high waist/low waist/skinny/baggy pants/shorts. I was shocked some years ago when high-waisted pants were back in style for girls, because I remember my female friends showing me a comedy sketch about 20 years prior about “mom jeans” which looked the same as what was popular now (and clearly trendy if even Taylor Swift was wearing them.)

I wonder if my baggy jeans with the stripes down the sides will ever be back in fashion… Or if ska will. (was ska really ever in fashion, lol?) Sadly I don’t think I was actually ever fashionable, as likely evidenced by my choice of jeans and music.
 
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kinda irrelevant kinda not. can any UCLA med students look at this and let us know if it's twitter style fear-mongering about wokeism etc.

I feel like classifying obesity as a slur is pretty ridiculous (but I also recognize the twitter people blow stuff out of proportion all the time.)


I mean, it takes a few seconds to look at this "reporter's" Twitter to see that he is indeed full-blown woke-mob fear-mongering.
 
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I am a faculty member at UCLA and while this is my first post I think everyone will quickly understand why I want to remain anonymous. I also realize that when someone posts something like this as their first post everyone should be openly skeptical of the post and try to understand what motives the poster has. My motives are simple, I think the administration at UCLA medical school have made some major changes to the curriculum that are detrimental to the medical school and the students. If you are applying to UCLA just ask the students and you can decide for myself if there is any truth in what I am posting.



A few years ago the medical school made some major changes to the curriculum, essentially the two preclinical years were cut down to one year. For those of us who went through medical school these two years are difficult and there is a great deal to learn in this time. The thought was to cut out the waste and focus on the key topics, I can say without a doubt this has been a colossal failure. The residents and faculty I work with have noticed a dramatic decrease in the knowledge of the medical students since this change. Most medical schools still have two years of pre-clinical curriculum and then as a third year student you start your clinical rotations and then the 4th year is primarily based on specialty rotations and applying to your chosen field. While many people can argue if this is the ideal model for teaching medical students, I can tell you with certainty it is better than what UCLA has done. UCLA decided to cram the two years of pre-clinical courses into one year. Then the 2nd year students do their clinical rotations, the third year is an “discovery year” where students can do anything they want and then they return as 4th year students for the typical 4th year rotations.



I was not part of the committee that decided to make this change but I have a theory as to why the made a change in the curriculum. Before the new curriculum, every year 5-10% of the UCLA medical students struggled to pass step 1. Prior to this change many of these students were advised to take a year off to study exclusively for step 1. I have mentored a bunch of UCLA students who did this and it hurt their residency applications because programs wanted to know why they took this year off. I suspect that one of the reasons UCLA created this new curriculum is to provide that year for the students who can’t pass step 1 otherwise. While this might sound like a good idea the end result is the UCLA students are trying to learn everything in the pre-clinical classes in one year. It’s been awhile since I was in medical school but I remember the two years of pre-clinical courses I took were extremely difficulty and they took endless hours of studying to learn the material.
Lol, I will probably light you up later, but I will let my MS2 evaluations speak for themselves .... :) I attend UCLA, and these are the evaluations from my EM rotation. Many schools don't even have EM as their core clerkship, and I could still shine and do well on the shelf.

I have also passed all my shelf exams and feel supported by the UCLA academic team and tutors.
It hasn't been easy, but any medical student or doctor I've spoken to said they didn't feel ready to be in the clinic after two years, so no matter what, nobody truly feels prepared.
 

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I mean, it takes a few seconds to look at this "reporter's" Twitter to see that he is indeed full-blown woke-mob fear-mongering.
Hearing perspectives from activists from different communities, including fat activists, was truly important. A lot of weight-based medicine is rooted in prejudice and not fat. All patients deserve care and to be heard. Considering so many stories of patients being ignored because of their weight and only told to make lifestyle modifications to find out they have an actual medical condition is alarming.

It is also hilarious that someone who is an M1 is taking time to leak curriculum snippets to these folks, who will take it and run with it. I am apprehensive about who our future doctors are.
 
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