kcpride

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does anyone know if it makes a difference at all where you went to to undergrad? for instance, if you went to an ivy and had a little bit lower grades than someone who didn't, will admissions take into account where you went to school at all?
 

jackieMD2007

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You could try going to Search University.
 
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riceman04

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kcpride said:
does anyone know if it makes a difference at all where you went to to undergrad? for instance, if you went to an ivy and had a little bit lower grades than someone who didn't, will admissions take into account where you went to school at all?
not all that much...school name is considered (there are some caveats for some schools that adcomm's somehow know have severe grade inflation) but it wont make the biggest diff.
 

Dr Durden

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Here's some of LizzyM's posts. She actually sits on an adcom as opposed to the rampant idle speculation by all the rest of us pre-meds.

Some of her posts on the topic:

"Hmmmm... you can get away with a gpa that is -0.2 to -0.4 below the med school mean provided that 1) the school is highly regarded academically, 2) your major was considered a difficult one (engineering almost anywhere) and 3) your MCAT scores are at least a point above the med school's mean in each of the three sections."



"If your undergrad college was easy to get into and admitted most applicants with SAT scores of 1000 and above, then you are going to be considered a big fish in a small pond (it might be easier to be an academic stand-out in that school than at a school where most of the students had SATs of 1400 or better). So, you not only have to have an exceptionally high gpa but you need to do at least as well on the MCAT as the students from the "well-known" schools (level playing field & all that). A MCAT below a med school's average is not going to go over big if you are from a school that is not an academic power-house."



"You know that it is easier to get into some undergrad institutions than others. You know that the average SAT score at some schools is 1400 and at others it is 1000.

Now imagine that both schools teach Chem 101 and grade on a curve. If you are talented enough to get into either one, you are going to earn a higher gpa at the school with the "on average" less talented students (given the same amount of effort). Even if there is no curve, an exceptionally talented student is going to be "average" at a top 10 research university and "well above average" compared with fellow students at Smallville State College or Faithfilled Bible College.

So, the medical schools see a 4.0 or 3.7 frmo Smallville or Faithfilled and they don't consider it comparable to a similar gpa at a "name brand" school because the caliber of students is "on average" not as high. A very high MCAT can provide evidence to disprove the "big fish in a small pond" phenomenon that we sometimes see at no-name schools."
 

Rafa

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hmm...haven't seen this thread since i last went to SEARCHtown.
 

LizzyM

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kcpride said:
does anyone know if it makes a difference at all where you went to to undergrad? for instance, if you went to an ivy and had a little bit lower grades than someone who didn't, will admissions take into account where you went to school at all?
This is where the MCAT tends to level the playing field. Let's take two applicants attending college in New Haven, Connecticut. One attends Yale University and the other attends Southern Connecticut State University. Let's say that the Yalie has a 3.5 and the SCSU applicant has a 3.7. If the MCATs are the same we might expect that both are equally talented but the SCSU student had a little less competition in the classroom in comparison to the Yale classroom. So in that regard, maybe we figure that a Yale education is worth an extra 0.2 in comparison to a former state teachers college type of school.

If the MCAT of the Yalie is higher (let's say a 32 vs. a 36) then we might say that the 3.5/36 beats a 3.7/32. We are taking the school into consideration as well as the exam.

If we get a surprise and the SCSU student has a higher gpa and a higher MCAT then the Yalie, while strong at 3.5/32, is not as strong as the 3.7/36.
 
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