Chloroform4Life

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I'm not sure what it's like at other school, but this year at my school, a lot more people went into primary care than previous years (like 45%). ObamaCare might play a role in this or it could just be year to year variation, it's hard to say.

One thing is for certain though, the number of residency slots are decreasing and the number of applicants are increasing. While I think this is necessary, it will be scary for future applicants.
 

rsgillmd

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I'm not sure what it's like at other school, but this year at my school, a lot more people went into primary care than previous years (like 45%). ObamaCare might play a role in this or it could just be year to year variation, it's hard to say.

One thing is for certain though, the number of residency slots are decreasing and the number of applicants are increasing. While I think this is necessary, it will be scary for future applicants.
I agree that the number and quality of applicants is increasing, but what makes you say the number of residency slots is decreasing? I thought there was no net change, or maybe even a slight increase. Just curious.
 

Chloroform4Life

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I agree that the number and quality of applicants is increasing, but what makes you say the number of residency slots is decreasing? I thought there was no net change, or maybe even a slight increase. Just curious.
I was told this by one of the clinical advisers at my school. It might have been his opinion and not a hard fact. But considering that people are trying to cut healthcare cost any opportunity they have, it's not unreasonable to decrease the number of doctors in this country.

If they do decide to cut slots, I hope they do it after next year :D.
 

Narcotized

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But considering that people are trying to cut healthcare cost any opportunity they have, it's not unreasonable to decrease the number of doctors in this country.
Not true. Residents are a cash cow. I believe the government funds the programs something like over $100,000 per resident per year. Add that to your low pay and high workload, and no program is trying to cut back on residents to save money.
 

Chloroform4Life

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Not true. Residents are a cash cow. I believe the government funds the programs something like over $100,000 per resident per year. Add that to your low pay and high workload, and no program is trying to cut back on residents to save money.
True, I know that residents do the most work in the hospital and are cash cows. But on a long term basis, more residents equal more attendings and that equals more cost. Residency programs won't want to decrease the number of positions, but the government may, especially if they are paying for the attendings. And unfortunately, it's the government that determines the number of residency slots.
 

cfdavid

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True, I know that residents do the most work in the hospital and are cash cows. But on a long term basis, more residents equal more attendings and that equals more cost. Residency programs won't want to decrease the number of positions, but the government may, especially if they are paying for the attendings. And unfortunately, it's the government that determines the number of residency slots.
I don't really see this logic. More residencts= more attendings (sure), but more attendings = more "cost", I'm not following you here.

Also, I think it's going to be politically unviable to reduce the # of residency positions (as an aggregate) in the U.S.
 

Chloroform4Life

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If the government runs the healthcare system as Obama is trying achieve, then who do you think will be paying the attending's salary?

If one attending cost the government $300k a year, how much do you think 2 attendings are going to cost?

Yes, for anesthesia, there is kind of a fixed number for demands so more attendings may mean less pay per attending. But there are administrative and insurance costs that don't factor into supply/demand. Luckily, the number for demands may be going up soon d/t the baby boomers, but after they die off, it will go back down. It's tough to really speculate that far into the future and I could totally be wrong. But the way things are going, this is how I see it.

Note:
http://residency.wustl.edu/medadmin/resweb.nsf/L/A6E8C6B1BA8C35CB86256F8F0071C74F?OpenDocument

Number of categorical + advanced anesthesiology position in 2006 to 2009: 1561 > 1338 > 1364 >1374

 

Narcotized

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Residency programs won't want to decrease the number of positions, but the government may... And unfortunately, it's the government that determines the number of residency slots.
OK, I thought you were first saying programs would cut residents to save money.