SDN members see fewer ads and full resolution images. Join our non-profit community!

United State's aging population

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by pcguy2, May 1, 2007.

  1. pcguy2

    pcguy2 Minneapolis Master 2+ Year Member

    161
    0
    Apr 17, 2006
    Minneapolis
    With the aging population of the United States, do you guys think there will be a shift in the demand of specialities? Will we see an increased need for oncology, radiology, and geriatrics compared to before?
     
  2. SDN Members don't see this ad. About the ads.
  3. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    31,007
    9,836
    Dec 20, 2004
    It is already happening. But far more specialties than those deal with issues facing the elderly. Lots of organs don't work as well when you get older.
     
  4. postbacker

    postbacker Banned Banned

    1,208
    2
    Mar 27, 2007
    yes, and add ortho to the list (hips and rotator cuffs)...
     
  5. CoryChevalier

    CoryChevalier 2+ Year Member

    54
    0
    Oct 2, 2006
    urology.... :D
     
  6. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    31,007
    9,836
    Dec 20, 2004
    cardiology, neurology, nephrology. Anything organ based. The warranty runs out on everything when you get old.
     
  7. cardsurgguy

    cardsurgguy Senior Member 7+ Year Member

    314
    1
    Jan 20, 2004
    Pretty much all specialties to different extents.

    I heard a general surgeon a few weeks ago who said he was doing a procedure (can't remember which one) on a person above 80, which he said would never have been done on a person above 80 15-20 years ago since the same age now is healthier than that age years ago and their body can tolerate much more.
     
  8. pcguy2

    pcguy2 Minneapolis Master 2+ Year Member

    161
    0
    Apr 17, 2006
    Minneapolis
    Anything in specific that will be hit especially hard? I guess it is true that all organs begin to lose their function. However, is there anything specific to the aging baby boomer generation?
     
  9. cardsurgguy

    cardsurgguy Senior Member 7+ Year Member

    314
    1
    Jan 20, 2004
    Anything to do with incontinence:laugh:
     
  10. pcguy2

    pcguy2 Minneapolis Master 2+ Year Member

    161
    0
    Apr 17, 2006
    Minneapolis
    Haha....
     
  11. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    31,007
    9,836
    Dec 20, 2004
    Except peds.
     
  12. postbacker

    postbacker Banned Banned

    1,208
    2
    Mar 27, 2007
    Tell that to my granddaddy in diapers who drools on himself...:laugh:
     
  13. pcguy2

    pcguy2 Minneapolis Master 2+ Year Member

    161
    0
    Apr 17, 2006
    Minneapolis
    oh gosh.......... :eek:
     
  14. Tired

    Tired Fading away 7+ Year Member

    3,886
    770
    Dec 12, 2006
    Biggest scam ever.

    I'm putting "No Geratricians" in my living will.
     
  15. Institute

    Institute 2+ Year Member

    103
    0
    Apr 14, 2007
    don't forget the specialties that will have to cater to the war vets when they come home. This coupled with the retiring baby boom gen = oh noes for medicine.
     
  16. Jasoos

    Jasoos Speculumating 5+ Year Member

    44
    0
    Mar 15, 2007
    Suva, Fiji
    Humourous as that may be, do you think that the above could be a genuine concern?
    Well, maybe not the specific concern highlighted above, but perhaps there are area of research or resource development that are being neglected today, thay may cause problems in an ageing population?
     
  17. Tired

    Tired Fading away 7+ Year Member

    3,886
    770
    Dec 12, 2006
    It's apples and oranges. It's not like, if we didn't spend money on viagra and implants, that's money that could be directed towards dementia research.
     
  18. Critical Mass

    Critical Mass Guest

    1,713
    2
    Feb 23, 2007
    I'm going to need an anesthesiologist to help me deal with the pain of my rising tuition and debt levels.

    :thumbdown:
     
  19. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    31,007
    9,836
    Dec 20, 2004
    Right. Pfizer and Dow Corning (or whoever makes implants these days) invest in research based on the likely costs to product and analysis of market size. It's not like big pharm wouldn't invest more in something like dementia research if they thought a product was within reach through a similar investment. Our research is market driven, not (for the most part) directed, although there are certain tax incentives to direct development of certain "orphan drugs" for which the market is small.
     
  20. Tired

    Tired Fading away 7+ Year Member

    3,886
    770
    Dec 12, 2006
    In addition, there are directed government funds for research in specific areas. The National Institute for Aging has nearly a billion dollars a year in research funds earmarked by Congress; I don't know the exact numbers, but one would imagine that a substantial portion of this is dedicated to dementia research, and that none of it is tied up in reseach for breast augmentation (although I think "Geri-plants" would be a great brand name).

    Too frequently the discussion of research funding and priorities is dramatically oversimplified or just plain misleading (ie - "only 10% of government research funding goes towards women's diseases"). I'm hardly an expert, but it seems like even 20 minutes of reading on the subject coould clear up many people's misconceptions.
     
  21. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    31,007
    9,836
    Dec 20, 2004
    Yeah, that is the flaw in that above quote. The money going to erectile dysfunction and implant research isn't coming from the same places. You can direct some amount of government funds, maybe incentivize businesses to work on certain things, but by and large the big ticket items are going to be cost and consumer driven money from the pharmaceutical and medical device industry, not from governments or grants.
     
  22. cfdavid

    cfdavid Banned Banned 7+ Year Member

    3,407
    6
    Oct 24, 2004
    Not to mention improvements in perioperative care and minimally invasive surgery, which is a lot easier on the body. That's another reason older folks are able to get procedures done that they previously may have been excluded from due to risk.
     

Share This Page