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URGENT: Moving from state to state with a Counseling Masters

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~Rana

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I am a recent graduate with a B.A in Psychology. I am very confused about some things regarding counseling master's degrees and I would really appreciate some help! Please excuse my ignorance in some questions but I am still very new in this area and trying my best to do all the research.

*Note: I would really like to specialize in children. So I am looking into doing some sort of child track.

1) I originally planned to do a PsyD but due to some very compelling reasons I will need to move to another state (not sure where exactly yet) in two years time. Since the PsyD program will take at least 5+ years and credits are non-transferable I have decided to do a masters in counseling instead and maybe continue onto a PhD in counseling later if possible. I understand the differences in terms of clinical practice, income, and degree level...but I feel like it's such a silly reason to make such a switch. Is there some sort of solution to this situation that I am not finding?

2) How long does it normally take to finish hours needed to go from a LPC to a LPCC?

3) What do you do in terms of working while at the LPC level, do you only do your hours or are you able to be hired at hospitals/clinics etc to gain some sort of income?

4) You cannot open a private practice when you have the LPC only right?

5) How easy is it to go to another state when you are only an LPC? Can you do the hours needed to become an LPCC in another state? Where/which website are state requirements clearly stated? Because nbcc.org did not list number of hours required in each state.

6) I will remain in Chicago, Illinois for my masters (2 years). I originally planned to apply to Adler, Chicago School of Professional Psychology, and Roosevelt. Then I realized that Northwestern offers a counseling masters as well. Is it really worth the 90K+ tuition in the long run? Keeping in mind the struggle it will take for an average LPC income to cover that after graduation? Are there other schools in Chicago that I am not aware of?

7) If a school doesn't have a child track, is there someway I can specialize in children later? (In Chicago, only offered at Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

THANK YOU!!!
 

~Rana

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My post is quite long and I'm seeing a lot of views but no replies. Please feel free to answer at least one of my questions...you don't necessarily have to answer all of them. Thank you.
 

AMNOT3

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Rana,

I am very interested in this thread being answered. LPC stands for Licensed Professional Counselor? What is the difference between LPC and LPCC? I too am interested in getting my Doctorate and I am looking at a Master's Program instead of the 5+ years to get a doctorate and I also would like to work with children. I was told that if I did my Masters and became a Licensed Mental Health Counselor, (LMHC) it would shorten the time for me to get my Doctorate. (I don't know how true that is...) However I cannot seem to find the answer ANYWHERE! I hope you get your answer and if I find anything out I will be sure to share it with you. I take it you are in Illinois? I am in Florida, so I don't know how much I can be of help but I will try.
 

PinkPsych

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#1 - The solution you may have overlooked would be to wait until you are settled in your new location to begin your studies. You may have to really search yourself to determine if you can wait to pursue your original plan and what would be the costs and benefits of waiting versus enrolling in a Master's program.

#2- In some programs taking the NCE (National Counselor Examination) which leads to the LPC in Illinois is a part of the last year of Master's training. You begin accruing your supervised hours post graduation. It is approx. 2000 in Illinois and that usually takes about 2 years. After the 2 years and sitting for an additional exam you can get your LCPC (Illinois).

#3- Generally, the 2000 hours of supervised practice post-Master's is earned while working at paid employment. You will have to ensure that your job can provide you with the supervision needed. I have seen people pay for supervision but ideally you should make sure that is available to you on your job.

#4- In Illinois the LPC does not allow you to practice independently (i.e. without supervision). You cannot bill insurance yourself without an LCPC.

#5- To my knowledge, each state lists its own licensure requirements on their individual websites. NBCC wouldn't have an aggregate document, but ACA might. Your best bet would be to look at each state you may move to individually to see what the requirements are. Portability of the counseling license was once horrible. It is now getting better. The good news is that your test scores from the licensing exams are almost always portable.

#6- Northwestern is a great program and offers great training. My suggestion would be to try to talk to current students at all the schools you are interested in. A very low cost alternative in the Chicagoland area is Governor's State University. It is one of the few public schools that offer a Master's degree in the area. For better or worse, master's in counseling programs are pretty profitable for schools. Almost all the private colleges have some version of the program. I am not endorsing any program, but Northeastern Illinois, North Park University, St Xavier, and Concordia College all have some version of a counseling program.

#7- I know much less about work with children, but some of the programs I listed above have school counseling. Also, sometimes your 'specialization' as it were, comes for the practica and internship you choose. If you go to sites that serve children then you would get that specific training.

Good Luck!
 
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xXIDaShizIXx

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#1 - The solution you may have overlooked would be to wait until you are settled in your new location to begin your studies. You may have to really search yourself to determine if you can wait to pursue your original plan and what would be the costs and benefits of waiting versus enrolling in a Master's program.

#2- In some program taking the NCE (National Counselor Examination) which leads to the LPC in Illinois is a part of the last year of Master's training. You begin accruing your supervised hours post graduation. It is approx. 2000 in Illinois and that usually takes about 2 years. After the 2 years and sitting for an additional exam you can get your LCPC (Illinois).

#3- Generally, the 2000 hours of supervised practice post-Master's is earned while working at paid employment. You will have to ensure that your job can provide you with the supervision needed. I have seen people pay for supervision but ideally you should make sure that is available to you on your job.

#4- In Illinois the LPC does not allow you to practice independentlym (i.e. without supervision). You cannot bill insurance yourself without an LCPC.

#5- To my knowledge, each state lists its own licensure requirements on their individual websites. NBCC wouldn't have an aggregate document, but ACA might. Your best bet would be to look at each state you may move to individually to see what the requirements are. Portability of the counseling license was once horrible. It is now getting better. The good news is that your test scores from the licensing exams are almost always portable.

#6- Northwestern is a great program and offers great training. My suggestion would be to try to talk to current students at all the schools you are interested in. A very low cost alternative in the Chicagoland area is Governor's State University. It is one of the few public schools that offer a Master's degree in the area. For better or worse, master's in counseling programs are pretty profitable for schools. Almost all the private colleges have some version of the program. I am not endorsing any program, but Northeastern Illinois, North Park University, St Xavier, and Concordia College all have some version of a counseling program.

#7- I know much less about work with children, but some of the program I listed above have school counseling. Also, sometimes your 'specialization' as it were, comes for the practica and internship you choose. If you go to sites that serve children then you would get that specific training.

Good Luck!

This post covers everything you need OP.:thumbup:
 
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