US board certified family physician - return to Canada

Frostmoon

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Dec 8, 2011
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I am a Canadian citizen and finished residency in US. I'm currently working full-time in US as a border certified family physician. Due to family issues, I'm thinking about returning to Canada next year. How can I obtain unrestricted license upon returning? I intend to practice in Ontario. I heard that I might need to complete MCCQE2, but the exam had been canceled twice this year. Is there anyway to get full license without taking QE2? Any input is appreciated.
 

AnesthAnon

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Jan 24, 2013
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Some provinces will grant you a full unrestricted license if you have your USMLE + board certification in FM, I'm just not sure which - maybe SK? BC? MB? AB?

You should check each provincial licensing authority for more information.
 

schmutz

5+ Year Member
Mar 18, 2015
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I'm going through this right now (in a different specialty). This is what I have learned so far:

Nova Scotia and New Brunswick will take USMLEs in lieu of MCCQEs. Once you get the full license in one of the provinces that signed the free-trade agreement, you are eligible for a license in other provinces. So, in theory, you should be able to get a full license with CPSO if you can get it in any other province, even if you don't qualify for CPSO license based on your credentials. Whether that works in practice I am not sure as I personally know no one who has done it.

If anyone knows more, please contribute! This is such a niche path that there are only a few people in the whole country who have taken it.
 
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Gos81238ia

Irish med school, US residency, Canadian practice
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Mar 8, 2012
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I'm going through this right now (in a different specialty). This is what I have learned so far:

Nova Scotia and New Brunswick will take USMLEs in lieu of MCCQEs. Once you get the full license in one of the provinces that signed the free-trade agreement, you are eligible for a license in other provinces. So, in theory, you should be able to get a full license with CPSO if you can get it in any other province, even if you don't qualify for CPSO license based on your credentials. Whether that works in practice I am not sure as I personally know no one who has done it.

If anyone knows more, please contribute! This is such a niche path that there are only a few people in the whole country who have taken it.
Not so niche!! I know lots of people who have done it, myself included, I think just not clearly advertised how to be done. Yes bottom line is it depends which province you are trying to get to. Agree with NS and NB. Without MCC exams, Ontario and BC will give you a restricted license requiring supervision for a year. This generally restricts you to one practice location (ie. as a hospitalist only or clinic only) and requires someone to precept you. That person does not have to be on site. They can check in with you at their leisure. There is a practice assessment at your site with MCC at the end.
 

schmutz

5+ Year Member
Mar 18, 2015
7
1
Not so niche!! I know lots of people who have done it, myself included, I think just not clearly advertised how to be done. Yes bottom line is it depends which province you are trying to get to. Agree with NS and NB. Without MCC exams, Ontario and BC will give you a restricted license requiring supervision for a year. This generally restricts you to one practice location (ie. as a hospitalist only or clinic only) and requires someone to precept you. That person does not have to be on site. They can check in with you at their leisure. There is a practice assessment at your site with MCC at the end.
Gos, so have you gone the way of getting CPSO license by means of getting licensed in another province first? Do they require you to have actually worked in the province where you are licensed? Anything worth knowing before embarking on this path?
 

Virk007

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Jul 5, 2007
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Not sure if this has been answered before but I was curious about the path back home (Ontario). Currently finishing 3rd year FM residency. I will be writing ABFM boards in April 2021. Do I need to get a state license before I can apply for an Ontario license or just be "eligible" for one in the state? Currently on temporary training license. Thanks
 

schmutz

5+ Year Member
Mar 18, 2015
7
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For the record, got a response from CPSBC. The RCPSC certifications and USMLEs will get you a full license in BC (despite what their perplexing "flowchart" may suggest). One question yet to be answered is: will CPSO/CPSA grant full license once a full license in NS or BC is acquired. Stay tuned.
 

Gos81238ia

Irish med school, US residency, Canadian practice
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Mar 8, 2012
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Gos, so have you gone the way of getting CPSO license by means of getting licensed in another province first? Do they require you to have actually worked in the province where you are licensed? Anything worth knowing before embarking on this path?
I did not go through another province, no, so not sure on the details on that. While I was a resident in the US, I wrote QE1, QE2 and then the canadian FM exam alongside all my American exams. Was all licensed through CPSO in about 10 weeks.
 

Gos81238ia

Irish med school, US residency, Canadian practice
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Mar 8, 2012
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Not sure if this has been answered before but I was curious about the path back home (Ontario). Currently finishing 3rd year FM residency. I will be writing ABFM boards in April 2021. Do I need to get a state license before I can apply for an Ontario license or just be "eligible" for one in the state? Currently on temporary training license. Thanks
Yes you need your state license, you have to be fully licensed in the US and graduated to even start the application process. The only thing you can skip is paying for a DEA number for prescribing controlled substances.
 
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