Dismiss Notice
Hey Texans—join us for a DFW meetup! Click here to learn more.

US/Canada Dual Citizen - unfamiliar with Canadian system

Discussion in 'Canada' started by eviltwin3029, Jan 3, 2009.

  1. eviltwin3029

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2009
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I was born in Ontario and moved to the states at a young age. I am almost done with undergrad in the states. I want to go back to Canada for med school.

    So here are my questions:

    1) How many med schools is it typical to apply to in Canada?

    2) What scores are considered competitive in Canada? (GPA 3.95, MCAT 28)

    3) Would it be feasible to get a job in Canada even if I do my residency in the US?

    I would really appreciate any input!
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. dirtymac42

    dirtymac42 Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2005
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Hey,

    Interesting situation.

    I would certainly apply to as many as you would want to. If that makes any sense! Many schools, like the US, have official or unofficial rules governing preference of candidates. That is, some will give preferential regard to those from a particular area or if they attended that school for undergrad.

    Certainly your GPA looks great, it will really depend on what college you went to and what the average GPAs are from there. Each med school has its own conversion factor for domestic undergrad GPAs and i'm sure it does for foreign schools as well. As far as the MCAT goes, check the individual requirments for each school. Some actually weight the MCAT whereas most use it as a "cutoff".

    If you are a Canadian citizen and complete medical school and residency in the US, you will have to write the equivalent Royal College or College of Family Physicians exam in order to be allowed to practise. Furthermore, the Royal College will also have to certify that your US training is sufficent to allow you to write the exam. Example, a General Internal Medicine residency in the US is, on average, 3 years whereas it must be at least 4 in Canada. Therefore, many GIM grads from the States are barred from writing the Royal College exam until they complete 4 years of residency.

    Good luck.
     

Share This Page