shs

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I've scanned through some of the anecdotal remarks on this topic in the various threads below, but, to clarify....

For those people familiar with both the US and UK systems would you please care to comment on the following:

1. After finishing residency and subspecialty training in the US, what are the opportunities to practice as a consultant in the UK? I'm aware the of 'on paper' JCHMT (Joint Committee Higher Medical Training) 'equivalency' requirements, i.e. being able to satisfy the relevant specialty board that your training in the US has been equivalent, both in length and content as in the UK. Is it difficult to satisfy such requirements....and, if so, why?

I would be interested in Interventional Cardiology....the UK requirement is 2 years of General Internal Medicine and 6 years of Higher Specialist Training (as compared to 3 years of Internal Medicine and 4 years of Cardiology training in the US).

As for duration of training, are they still looking for an equivalency in the number of years, or, as per the EWTD guidelines, do they keep in mind the fact that trainees in the UK are not supposed to work more than 40-45 hours per week. This is half of what residents/fellows work even now, after the reduction in work hours in the US.

2. Does anyone have any idea what the compensation is like for Interventional Cardiology in the UK (Southeast, preferably London area)?
 

Furrball

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40 to 45 hours a week!!!??? Maybe I should have pursued dual noationality and trained in Britain.
 
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shs

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Indeed!!

Furrball said:
40 to 45 hours a week!!!??? Maybe I should have pursued dual noationality and trained in Britain.
 

john182

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shs said:
I've scanned through some of the anecdotal remarks on this topic in the various threads below, but, to clarify....

For those people familiar with both the US and UK systems would you please care to comment on the following:

1. After finishing residency and subspecialty training in the US, what are the opportunities to practice as a consultant in the UK? I'm aware the of 'on paper' JCHMT (Joint Committee Higher Medical Training) 'equivalency' requirements, i.e. being able to satisfy the relevant specialty board that your training in the US has been equivalent, both in length and content as in the UK. Is it difficult to satisfy such requirements....and, if so, why?

I would be interested in Interventional Cardiology....the UK requirement is 2 years of General Internal Medicine and 6 years of Higher Specialist Training (as compared to 3 years of Internal Medicine and 4 years of Cardiology training in the US).

As for duration of training, are they still looking for an equivalency in the number of years, or, as per the EWTD guidelines, do they keep in mind the fact that trainees in the UK are not supposed to work more than 40-45 hours per week. This is half of what residents/fellows work even now, after the reduction in work hours in the US.

2. Does anyone have any idea what the compensation is like for Interventional Cardiology in the UK (Southeast, preferably London area)?
I just pulled this down for requirements for consultant in cardiology in Barts (London):
Prof. Qualifications:
Required: MRCP (UK) or equivalent, Desired: Higher Degree

General Professional Training:
Required: On specialist register for cardiology, Desired: acute general medicine training with specialist registration for general medicine

Length of experience needed:
Required: 5 years at SpR level of equivalent Desired: expertise in interventional angiography, echocardiography, electrophysiology


THat's just a summary for a current job. You would get your Internal Medicine residency registered with the GMC first for full registration, and get them to recognise your fellowship then to get on the cardiology specialist register. Requirements for specialist register may or may not be that you need 5 years in cardiology (SpR equivalent) + 2 years in IM.

If you're fellowship was only 3 years what they seem to mean is that you will get on their specialist register if you do 2 more years as a fellow or practice for 2 years as an attending in the speciality to make up the requirements.

Best answer: call the GMC.