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Veneer Ethics?

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marshall

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Hi,

I was watching tv for the first time in a while the other day and I saw a cosmetic makeover that involved plastic surgery and a nice set of anterior veneers (def. maxillary probably mandibular too). The problem I had was that the patient was a high school kid with otherwise nice teeth. He obviously wore braces and there didn't seem to be any other problems other than some yellowness.

I was wondering if everyone thinks it is okay to lay down some nice incisal reduction of perfectly healthy tooth enamel and throw some veneers on. Natural tooth, coupled with good oral hygiene and friendly diet (which he looked like he had), would probably last longer.

If the case isn't handled so as to take occlusion perfectly into account, or if you grind at night or if you eat a lot of apples I would think that those veneers might become damaged rather quickly. At least sooner than natural tooth would.

What do you guys think? Is it okay to chop off healthy tooth in young patients so we can deliver A1 beautiful teeth?

Cheers,
Marshall
 

ShawnOne

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Let me guess, you were watching MTV's "I Want a Famous Face"..

I was shocked when I saw it!!
 

ShawnOne

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BTW, didnt those two guys look like Beavis and Butthead?
 

no2thdk999

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I thought the veneers made them both look like that Kojocareau guy on Entertainment tonight.

I disagree that they were great teeth to start with besides the color. The gingiva was uneven and the teeth looked short and flat.

I think you have to describe all the risks and let the patient decide. If they really want big white horse teeth why shouldn't them be able to get them?

As an aside I know this is a dental forum but why did the veneers upset you? The rhinoplasty and chin/cheek implants were much more invasive procedures.


JMHO
Rob

p.s. they did look like Beavis and Butthead and that DDS was a total toolbag with his "porcelain enhancements"
 

LestatZinnie

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i agree. 99% of cosmetic procedures, whether dental or plastic, are not done for health reasons, but rather psychological. Veneers may be 'uncessary', but so are all other plastic surgery procedures which have even more serious health implications than dental cosmetic procedures.
 

marshall

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Originally posted by no2thdk999

As an aside I know this is a dental forum but why did the veneers upset you? The rhinoplasty and chin/cheek implants were much more invasive procedures.

Hmm I guess because as far as I know once you're healed the worst ailment that may become you is ruptured saline implants and the periodic need for replacement (for breasts at least).

Just something I was thinking about instead of doing real work :)

And that dentist looked like a real tool.

Cheers,
Marshall
 

PashaJ

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Originally posted by marshall
And that dentist looked like a real tool.

He had a great head of hair though.

Anyone watch Real world this week? As soon as that girl opened her mouth that tooth caught my eye. It's amazing that certain things don't bother people.
 

DrJeff

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If you've taken the time to explain all the risks/life expectancies of/ preparation involvement to the patient, then I have no problem with it. Plus, as a rule of thumb, the profit you have on veneers is disproportionately larger than any other procedure you'll do. This is kind of a last step safeguard since insurance coverage is rare (if any) for veneers, so when the patient sees the tx plan they'll often think twice about wheather or not they really want to do this.

additionally with veneers such as Cerinate veneers by denmat, you can actually do a "no-prep" veneer for the patient, so then you're bonding 100% to enamle without having to grind away any precious enamel rods, so WHEN you're redoing the venners in about 10 years, you'll still have all the enamel there with which to work on.
 
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