Feb 18, 2013
36
4
22
New Jersey
Status
Pre-Veterinary
Hello all, I'm currently going into my second year of community college and I have started to look at schools to transfer to next year. I'm interested in being a vet tech or a vet. I honestly cannot decide, I've shadowed both, I've spoken to both, and I cannot pick one.
I found a school that would offer me all the courses needed to be accepted into vet school while at the same time get me certified as a vet tech so if I didn't get accepted into vet school I could follow that instead, since I'm so undecided. I'd have a B.S in veterinary technology.
Do you think this would be a good idea? Or should I just pick something and go full on for that?
Heres the program, I don't know if any of you guys have heard of it or know if it is bogus or not: https://www.mercy.edu/degrees-programs/bs-veterinary-technology-pre-veterinary-medicine#faqs
Thanks for any help/input!
 

Devastating

:ok_hand: 2022
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Sep 13, 2015
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I am actually about to start a similar program this semester :) BS in veterinary technology (although it's a bit different in my case, I'm not planning on possibly being a tech long-term but am doing it as a post-bacc/second bachelors to strengthen my academics for vet school).

Where is this school located in relation to you, though (in-state, out of state)? It'd definitely be a great way to kill two birds with one stone, but if you'd have to go out of your way financially to attend this school then you'd probably be better off transferring to whatever 4yr university you're interested in that is affordable. I'm not sure it would be worth moving cross country and going into significant debt for, when most any degree would suffice for vet school admissions (and for gaining experience, you can always work as an unlicensed assistant/tech). This is also not the only place you can get this degree; according to my school, there are around 22 of these programs in the country, try looking into them and weighing their pros and cons.

Don't know if all schools work like this, but at mine you have to complete the initial 2 years' worth of prerequisite credits (basically, all your gen-eds and sciences, which you're probably working on now) and then start applying to the vet program itself--there is a maximum number of seats, so getting in is not guaranteed. I am lucky because this program exists at a local university where I've been taking courses, and I already had most all of the prerequisites from my previous degree so I could apply straight away, but imagine if you didn't get in the first try and had to reapply...potentially extending your time at university by another semester. Something to consider.

Basically, I would totally recommend this type of program if it's accessible to you, but I also wouldn't be dead-set on it to the point of thinking it's the only good option ;) You could do just as well by going for a degree in whatever, seeking out quality experiences, and continuing to get a feel for different areas of the vet field and DVM vs. tech. I won't be starting for another few weeks, but feel free drop me a message anytime and I'll try to answer any questions about the program and how it works as I go through :)
 
OP
wolfyzheart
Feb 18, 2013
36
4
22
New Jersey
Status
Pre-Veterinary
I am actually about to start a similar program this semester :) BS in veterinary technology (although it's a bit different in my case, I'm not planning on possibly being a tech long-term but am doing it as a post-bacc/second bachelors to strengthen my academics for vet school).

Where is this school located in relation to you, though (in-state, out of state)? It'd definitely be a great way to kill two birds with one stone, but if you'd have to go out of your way financially to attend this school then you'd probably be better off transferring to whatever 4yr university you're interested in that is affordable. I'm not sure it would be worth moving cross country and going into significant debt for, when most any degree would suffice for vet school admissions (and for gaining experience, you can always work as an unlicensed assistant/tech). This is also not the only place you can get this degree; according to my school, there are around 22 of these programs in the country, try looking into them and weighing their pros and cons.

Don't know if all schools work like this, but at mine you have to complete the initial 2 years' worth of prerequisite credits (basically, all your gen-eds and sciences, which you're probably working on now) and then start applying to the vet program itself--there is a maximum number of seats, so getting in is not guaranteed. I am lucky because this program exists at a local university where I've been taking courses, and I already had most all of the prerequisites from my previous degree so I could apply straight away, but imagine if you didn't get in the first try and had to reapply...potentially extending your time at university by another semester. Something to consider.

Basically, I would totally recommend this type of program if it's accessible to you, but I also wouldn't be dead-set on it to the point of thinking it's the only good option ;) You could do just as well by going for a degree in whatever, seeking out quality experiences, and continuing to get a feel for different areas of the vet field and DVM vs. tech. I won't be starting for another few weeks, but feel free drop me a message anytime and I'll try to answer any questions about the program and how it works as I go through :)
Thanks for the reply!
The school is only an hour away which isn't too bad, and it isn't much more expensive per year tuition wise than a in-state school where I live. So I figured, why not, right?
But I understand what you mean that it isn't the only option, I just figured having the vet tech back up would be a wise idea in case I don't make it into vet school.
Thanks so much, I will want to hear about your experiences in the program you're doing!
 
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