Dec 4, 2013
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Hi Guys!

So I recently got an interview here and was wondering if any current students can give me any insights into the school. I did search the forum but could not find any recent info. Are you happy there? Attrition rates? Quality of the facilities and lecture halls?

Thanks a bunch!
 

Fedxup

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Oct 30, 2013
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LOL why doesn't anyone want to talk about NYCOM?

Um i'm pre med but
They have a great match list. You can look it up.
They have great OPTI.
I can't speak to anything else.

and ohh they have the largest medical school class in the US (99.9 % sure about this) ~300 students matriculate each year.

Would attend if given the opportunity. I think it's a great school.
 

ashtray81

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May 20, 2013
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Interviewing at NYCOM on Jan 15th. They do have a great match list in addition to the location and curriculum. Rotations are done at excellent hospitals, and I'm inclined to think that the clinical teaching here would be better compared to ANOTHER New York DO school. But as many have mentioned, the cost is steep...but for excellent teaching and a great reputation, guess you gotta pay.
 

cliquesh

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LOL why doesn't anyone want to talk about NYCOM?

Um i'm pre med but
They have a great match list. You can look it up.
They have great OPTI.
I can't speak to anything else.

and ohh they have the largest medical school class in the US (99.9 % sure about this) ~300 students matriculate each year.

Would attend if given the opportunity. I think it's a great school.
I think Indiana university is bigger. They take like 335 students per year, but they own most of the hospitals in the state, so it's ok.
 

Fedxup

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Oct 30, 2013
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I think Indiana university is bigger. They take like 335 students per year, but they own most of the hospitals in the state, so it's ok.
You sir are correct. And so does University of Illinois now that I check.
 
Jan 4, 2014
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I interviewed here and got accepted recently, still not sure if I am going to pick this school (the cost is a major deterrent).

The only insights I have are from my interview visit. The facilities were super nice (their anatomy lab and OMM lab were in excellent condition with new tech recently put in). The students were very friendly and enthusiastic. And the school has tons of affiliations, which I'd imagine would be good for the clerkship years.

If anyone has any more impressions from this school I'd appreciate it. I'm trying to assess the quality of teaching and if this is the best school for me.
 

calvinhobbes

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The OMM lab is brand new
 

briefbreak21

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Sep 30, 2010
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Hey guys, first year here! Feel free to ask any specific questions and I will do my best to provide an honest, unbiased op.
 
Jan 27, 2013
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Do you feel that the education your getting justifies the cost? How satisfied are you with your education this far? Do you feel that the school is helping you well to prepare for boards?
 

briefbreak21

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Do you feel that the education your getting justifies the cost? How satisfied are you with your education this far? Do you feel that the school is helping you well to prepare for boards?
While NYCOM is certainly one of the more expensive schools, I do feel that the cost is justified thus far, especially considering the location and the fact that the vast amount of graduates are able to practice in the NYC/Long Island Area (If that is your long term goal). There are also some things you can do to offset the cost:
Academic Medicine Scholar Program --> Do extra year of research/teaching for the school for a 2 year tuition waiver
3 year family medicine program
live cheaply (family, SO, etc, if possible)
tutor? (Going rates in this area for basic test prep consider $100/hr a bargain --> This is one of the richest areas in the country!)

As far as boards, I am still a first year so can't say for sure. However, as we go through a unit, it seems to follow the USMLE First Aid Step 1 board prep book to a T so I would take that to be a good sign.

To provide some more potentially useful info and save time, here is a copy of an email where I provide some more details about my prospective about the academics and the pros/cons school. Feel free to ask anything else!

From my experience here thus far, I believe that the curriculum, grading, and P/F rates are very fair. At times when the class does poorly on an exam as a whole, the next exam is made very easy to allow everyone to make up for it, or the exam gets a significant curve. I don't know anyone personally who has failed a block (although I know that some people have), but the people that stay involved, make their education their top priority, and don't have extenuating circumstances seem to do just fine. To put it another way, I honestly would not feel comfortable being treated by anyone who is not able to pass with the way the grading scale is currently set. I believe we started with 322 students and are currently at 308, not a huge drop in my opinion.

Overall, I am very happy with my education and I would choose it again if I would ( I ended up choosing nycom over 8 other acceptances).

Specific pros/cons:

pros:
no mandatory attendance--> all lectures are recorded and streamed online
all material you are responsible for handed out in packets and posted online --> no need to buy ANY textbooks
exams from the past 10 years + practice keys --> wonderful practice
no dress code ---> be comfy
new classrooms
close to NYC --> a TON of people (including me) commute from Queens (~30 min drive)
EPP program--> you study with about 30 physicians who are being retrained --> they are amazing people and a terrific resource
Diversity --> the school is EXTREMELY diverse
research --> there is research done by the faculty, an academic medicine program that gives you opportunities to do research, teach, and waives 2 years of tuition; also summer research fellowships, at school and places like MSKCC!
clinical sites--> clerkships around nyc
professors--> the faculty is great (esp Anatomy!); the alumni docs that come into lecture are really impressive--> many have faculty positions at cornell, mount sinai, etc.,
alot of clubs--> workout/yoga, all specialty clubs, etc.,
PBL curriculum for those that want it --> i dont do this so can't say much about it, but those that do love it
good library --> check out any textbooks, study, etc,
Fridges and microwaves for students --> you will need this (see cons)
school is specialty oriented --> most people want to specialize
school has a good reputation and lands prestige residencies (i.e- friend landed the only rehab/phy spot at yale last year)
big bro/ big sis program to help you get oriented
students are awesome

cons:
The WORST cafeteria EVER (most of the food is unidentifiable and tastes like ****) <-- not an exaggeration
Besides the terrible cafeteria, there is no other food anywhere else on campus
Coffee shop--> but very overpriced and closes pretty early (other food is a drive away ~ 10 min)
Stuff breaks down and it takes a while to fix it
complaints are not acted upon by administration
Terrible, practically non-existent gym
very difficult to get to campus with public transport --> will need a car
expensive tuition

Interview Experience: Very laid back, short, had an ethics question and a few others where you have to be creative/think on your feet but definitely nothing all of you can't handle.
 
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Dr. Zombie

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Apr 30, 2013
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While NYCOM is certainly one of the more expensive schools, I do feel that the cost is justified thus far, especially considering the location and the fact that the vast amount of graduates are able to practice in the NYC/Long Island Area (If that is your long term goal). There are also some things you can do to offset the cost:
Academic Medicine Scholar Program --> Do extra year of research/teaching for the school for a 2 year tuition waiver
3 year family medicine program
live cheaply (family, SO, etc, if possible)
tutor? (Going rates in this area for basic test prep consider $100/hr a bargain --> This is one of the richest areas in the country!)

As far as boards, I am still a first year so can't say for sure. However, as we go through a unit, it seems to follow the USMLE First Aid Step 1 board prep book to a T so I would take that to be a good sign.

To provide some more potentially useful info and save time, here is a copy of an email where I provide some more details about my prospective about the academics and the pros/cons school. Feel free to ask anything else!

From my experience here thus far, I believe that the curriculum, grading, and P/F rates are very fair. At times when the class does poorly on an exam as a whole, the next exam is made very easy to allow everyone to make up for it, or the exam gets a significant curve. I don't know anyone personally who has failed a block (although I know that some people have), but the people that stay involved, make their education their top priority, and don't have extenuating circumstances seem to do just fine. To put it another way, I honestly would not feel comfortable being treated by anyone who is not able to pass with the way the grading scale is currently set. I believe we started with 322 students and are currently at 308, not a huge drop in my opinion.

Overall, I am very happy with my education and I would choose it again if I would ( I ended up choosing nycom over 8 other acceptances).

Specific pros/cons:

pros:
no mandatory attendance--> all lectures are recorded and streamed online
all material you are responsible for handed out in packets and posted online --> no need to buy ANY textbooks
exams from the past 10 years + practice keys --> wonderful practice
no dress code ---> be comfy
new classrooms
close to NYC --> a TON of people (including me) commute from Queens (~30 min drive)
EPP program--> you study with about 30 physicians who are being retrained --> they are amazing people and a terrific resource
Diversity --> the school is EXTREMELY diverse
research --> there is research done by the faculty, an academic medicine program that gives you opportunities to do research, teach, and waives 2 years of tuition; also summer research fellowships, at school and places like MSKCC!
clinical sites--> clerkships around nyc
professors--> the faculty is great (esp Anatomy!); the alumni docs that come into lecture are really impressive--> many have faculty positions at cornell, mount sinai, etc.,
alot of clubs--> workout/yoga, all specialty clubs, etc.,
PBL curriculum for those that want it --> i dont do this so can't say much about it, but those that do love it
good library --> check out any textbooks, study, etc,
Fridges and microwaves for students --> you will need this (see cons)
school is specialty oriented --> most people want to specialize
school has a good reputation and lands prestige residencies (i.e- friend landed the only rehab/phy spot at yale last year)
big bro/ big sis program to help you get oriented
students are awesome

cons:
The WORST cafeteria EVER (most of the food is unidentifiable and tastes like ****) <-- not an exaggeration
Besides the terrible cafeteria, there is no other food anywhere else on campus
Coffee shop--> but very overpriced and closes pretty early (other food is a drive away ~ 10 min)
Stuff breaks down and it takes a while to fix it
complaints are not acted upon by administration
Terrible, practically non-existent gym
very difficult to get to campus with public transport --> will need a car
expensive tuition

Interview Experience: Very laid back, short, had an ethics question and a few others where you have to be creative/think on your feet but definitely nothing all of you can't handle.
U forgot to mention that due to the failures this year and the heavy curving they needed to do concert the entire curriculum to PBL for Fall 2014 and take a smaller class to remediate attrition
 
Jan 27, 2013
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U forgot to mention that due to the failures this year and the heavy curving they needed to do concert the entire curriculum to PBL for Fall 2014 and take a smaller class to remediate attrition
I didn't hear about this. You mind explaining a little bit more? How are they going to do PBL for that many students?
 

briefbreak21

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Sep 30, 2010
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U forgot to mention that due to the failures this year and the heavy curving they needed to do concert the entire curriculum to PBL for Fall 2014 and take a smaller class to remediate attrition
Seriously doubt this is true ^^^ please provide some evidence...sounds like a pretty crazy statement to me
 

Dr. Zombie

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Seriously doubt this is true ^^^ please provide some evidence...sounds like a pretty crazy statement to me
I don't have anything on paper. I'm dating a 2nd year at NYCOM and she has told me the issues this year since day 1. So far everything she's been keeping me up to date has been legit. That's my only citation. I'm sorry I don't have much other evidence.
 

briefbreak21

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I don't have anything on paper. I'm dating a 2nd year at NYCOM and she has told me the issues this year since day 1. So far everything she's been keeping me up to date has been legit. That's my only citation. I'm sorry I don't have much other evidence.
This is something they would definitely have to explain to people at interviews (especially that there is now no lecture option) and it has not been mentioned. While many people failed one block, they can still remediate in the summer and not many have actually left. We still have 308 students out of 322, a pretty normal attrition rate of ~ 5 %. As far as curving, only one exam has been curved: Anatomy Lab Exam 2 by less than 10 points. Last year's anatomy exam was also curved by 10 points so don't think that this justifies as "heavy curving they needed to do". Your info sounds just like one of the many baseless rumors floating around the school.
 

sylvanthus

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This is something they would definitely have to explain to people at interviews (especially that there is now no lecture option) and it has not been mentioned. While many people failed one block, they can still remediate in the summer and not many have actually left. We still have 308 students out of 322, a pretty normal attrition rate of ~ 5 %. As far as curving, only one exam has been curved: Anatomy Lab Exam 2 by less than 10 points. Last year's anatomy exam was also curved by 10 points so don't think that this justifies as "heavy curving they needed to do". Your info sounds just like one of the many baseless rumors floating around the school.
is this 5% attrition rate after 4 years or after the 1st year? If after the first year, no that is not a normal attrition rate.
 

calvinhobbes

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The school is becoming all-PBL next year, starting with the Class of 2018.

This new change in curriculum is a direct response to the very poor attrition rate (graduating ~270 but starting with ~320 four years prior is not good, folks), the large number of students that fail exams and blocks (NYCOM is infamous for this), and the high number of students that have failed the board exam in recent years (around ~30 people have failed the board exam each year in the past few years).

Hopefully, by becoming a totally PBL school, students will be studying board relevant information instead of studying the art of how to answer a poorly written NYCOM question on school exams.
 

Jjkwest1

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May 4, 2010
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Wait is there any confirmation on this? When I went to my interview they made no mention of this at all and said that if accepted you had to apply to the PBL program separately. Also, I don't see how making it all PBL would be feasible for 300+ students since there aren't many PBL rooms from what I saw during the interview tour.
 

Dr. Zombie

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Wait is there any confirmation on this? When I went to my interview they made no mention of this at all and said that if accepted you had to apply to the PBL program separately. Also, I don't see how making it all PBL would be feasible for 300+ students since there aren't many PBL rooms from what I saw during the interview tour.
They are reducing the class of 2018 so it will no longer be 300+ students and making it PBL. The staff had to do a ridic curve for the first two blocks in order to salvage students because otherwise they would have to fail/dismiss a crazy number.

I believe the decision came last week so it was not decided when you had your interview during the Fall.

Thanks for backing me up Calvin as always against the NYCOM-kool-aiders lol
 

littlegreen88

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This is completely not true . There was NO curve except for one exam and it was less than 10 percent... Also our averages are in the 80s.. :) stop spreading rumors !!
 

Dr. Zombie

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This is completely not true . There was NO curve except for one exam and it was less than 10 percent... Also our averages are in the 80s.. :) stop spreading rumors !!
LOL what a troll. You know how many people in that school besides the MS2 that I know who confirmed the curves?

Stop misleading people. I understand you gotta defend your alma mater because you're representing the school at the cost of tuition of course, but this is an anonymous forum so you're free to speak the truth without retaliation. This isn't North Korea and NYCOM is not Dear Leader.
 

littlegreen88

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LOL what a troll. You know how many people in that school besides the MS2 that I know who confirmed the curves?

Stop misleading people. I understand you gotta defend your alma mater because you're representing the school at the cost of tuition of course, but this is an anonymous forum so you're free to speak the truth without retaliation. This isn't North Korea and NYCOM is not Dear Leader.
As previous poster stated there has been a less then ten point curve on one anatomy final , no other curves.
 

briefbreak21

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LOL what a troll. You know how many people in that school besides the MS2 that I know who confirmed the curves?

Stop misleading people. I understand you gotta defend your alma mater because you're representing the school at the cost of tuition of course, but this is an anonymous forum so you're free to speak the truth without retaliation. This isn't North Korea and NYCOM is not Dear Leader.
LOL...wow so who is the actual troll here, the two current nycom first years, or the obviously bitter individual who known absolutely nothing about the school, our curriculum, or our scores?

Since I can't factually deny or reject your PBL curriculum change statement, although I have heard nothing about this from anyone, I am not going to comment on it. However, as a first year student who has all information on all of the current exams, I can tell you with 100 % confidence that no blocks or exams were curved except one anatomy exam by less than 10 points, so please stop blatantly spreading lies.

I can also tell you with 100% confidence that the large majority of the students that have left did so before the second system ended. Thus, these people chose to leave on their own accord and were not forced to do so by the school (a student must fail two blocks in order to be dismissed).

There would be no reason for me to defend my school if what you were saying had any truth to it whatsoever. But, since it is so blatantly false, I feel it is pretty unfair to base the opinions of pre-meds on the ramblings of a single individual who has absolutely no connection to the school.
The vast majority of my class is loving their time is here, doing well (the vast majority of exam averages are in the 80's), and are very satisfied with their education.

Pre-meds, please take note: Not a single nycom student, in the first year class, has corroborated any of the negative statements about nycom on this site. This is not at all the case at other schools where there appear to be problems (i.e- william carey). Please take everything you read on sdn with a HUGE grain of salt, and at least make sure to corroborate information with at least one affiliated student of the school in question.
 

Dr. Zombie

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1. LOL...wow so who is the actual troll here, the two current nycom first years, or the obviously bitter individual who known absolutely nothing about the school, our curriculum, or our scores?

2. Since I can't factually deny or reject your PBL curriculum change statement, although I have heard nothing about this from anyone, I am not going to comment on it. However, as a first year student who has all information on all of the current exams, I can tell you with 100 % confidence that no blocks or exams were curved except one anatomy exam by less than 10 points, so please stop blatantly spreading lies.

3. I can also tell you with 100% confidence that the large majority of the students that have left did so before the second system ended. Thus, these people chose to leave on their own accord and were not forced to do so by the school (a student must fail two blocks in order to be dismissed).

4. There would be no reason for me to defend my school if what you were saying had any truth to it whatsoever. But, since it is so blatantly false, I feel it is pretty unfair to base the opinions of pre-meds on the ramblings of a single individual who has absolutely no connection to the school.
The vast majority of my class is loving their time is here, doing well (the vast majority of exam averages are in the 80's), and are very satisfied with their education.

5. Pre-meds, please take note: Not a single nycom student, in the first year class, has corroborated any of the negative statements about nycom on this site. This is not at all the case at other schools where there appear to be problems (i.e- william carey). Please take everything you read on sdn with a HUGE grain of salt, and at least make sure to corroborate information with at least one affiliated student of the school in question.
1. I am not a troll. I have NOTHING to gain by bashing NYCOM. I give credit where it's due. I am not bitter because I do not have any interest in attending NYCOM. As I have said previously, my significant other is an MS2 and I know another MS2 plus 3 MS1 students. So if I am repeating what they have told me, then using logic, it means the current students in YOUR school know nothing about the school they pay tuition for.

2. Aside from my post, CalvinHobbes is a current student and he has verified it.

3. So you're telling me that out of all the 322 students, you happen to know all exact 14 students who are no longer part of the school and that all 14 left because of personal reasons. Not one because of failure of 2 blocks? LOL LOLLLLLL

4. I'm not an uninformed "premed" who rambles with no connections to the school. Not only do I have connections to the school but if you look at all my post history, never have I been a troll. So get your facts straight. Secondly, the vast majority of your class is loving their time there and the vast majority averages are in the 80s? Have you taken an anonymous survey of 250+ students to assess how they truly feel? Have you gone on the school database of 250+ students to confirm that their averages are indeed in the 80s?

5. Premeds, please take note: CalvinHobbes is a NYCOM student that can verify my horrendous claims that I have forwarded from my own connections at NYCOM. It is true that William Carey COM is a troubled school but that's not the topic is it? Like the poster has said, please take SDN comments at self-value. If you know a personal friend at NYCOM ask them privately. No student will publicly show their face and speak ill of their school.
 
Aug 27, 2013
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I posted this on the other NYCOM thread, and just hoped it could help some of you out.

I interviewed this past Tuesday, and although they did not mention the new curriculum during the main session (they spent most of the time talking about their 36-student PBL program), my interviewer shed some light on it.

He said this was all still in the works, but they are planning for lecture hours to be reduced. Some of the reduced time will then be used for groups of roughly 18 students to meet up and discuss cases with a moderator, similar to the PBL. However, due to the fact that they are accredited under a specific curriculum, they can't just change the entire system that quickly. Thus, it seems like you'd have maybe 1 or 2 of these group meetings a week, from what he said, in addition to lecture (which will be reduced compared to now). He also said that they are hoping to expand clinical opportunities to the lecture-based curriculum as well (as it stands, only PBL students get to shadow doctors in the first year), but he seemed less certain about that.
 
Feb 12, 2013
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I'm also an MS1 at NYIT-COM and as the other MS1's have stated, the only exam that has been curved thus far was our second Anatomy practical (I jumped up 9 points). As with average grades, they're usually in the mid-to-low 80's. We just finished our Integ unit and the overall mean was an 82% with an SD of 6. Most of the time you need above a 70 to pass the unit. As with the attrition rate, we just had a class meeting today and someone brought this topic up. Our class leaders said there's still ~300 students in the class, meaning that ~20 students have dropped (personally I only know of 1). Obviously I don't know the reasons, but some people failed and some people dropped out because med school wasn't for them. If you got a good head on your shoulders and work hard, you absolutely will not fail out.

On another note, I'm pretty sure no student, whether MS1, MS2, or MS whatever, knows exactly what the curriculum will be like next year. We just got a new dean this year (Dr. Wolfgang Gilliar) and he WANTS to incorporate more PBL into the curriculum, but that absolutely does not mean that the whole curriculum will be PBL. There will still be DPC (~36 students) and there will still be lecture, that I'm sure of because we just talked about it in our class meeting today.

Things are changing, and honestly I think the Class of 2018 and future classes are lucky. Dr. Gilliar is going to push this school into an even better direction. He's an incredible person and if you had the chance to speak with him at your interview then you'll know what I'm talking about (and if you have a future interview, definitely take the time to talk to Dr. Gilliar if he's available).

Good luck people!
 
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calvinhobbes

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You have to remember why they curved the second anatomy practical. It's because anatomy is a part of the overall grade for the block. And tons of people failed an exam in the second block, in addition to the practical. So they had to curve the practical so people could pass, but people still failed because they couldn't be bumped up that high in their grade. This happens every year, but this year has been more prominent with the number of failures seen for some reason. Many people failed an exam in the very first block too, that's where the "more than 100 people failed" came from. However, this caused some people to fail that first block, too...and if you fail two blocks, you're out.

This happened to the second year students this year as well. Around 20-30 MS2's will have to remediate because they failed one of the two blocks that was given concurrently at the start of the year. They can't take their boards on time, their rotations are delayed (lose out on elective time, etc.) I was told a few students even failed out of school because they failed both these double systems, and remember if you fail two, you're given the boot. Again, this is nothing new at NYCOM. People fail, remediate, are kicked out, or fail the boards, etc. every year.

Pre-meds, don't believe the school when they tell you that the Class of 2015 had a 99% board pass rate. Not entirely true. That class may have it now so those students could advance to 3rd year, but that pass rate is not on the first try.

Point is, it's clear this systems-based curriculum isn't working. Next year, anatomy will be it's own course/block, just like at other medical schools, so hopefully the proper attention can be given to anatomy. And the new Dean is fortunately making positive changes, and a PBL style learning starting with the Class of 2018 at the school can hopefully correct these problems. The overwhelming majority of students that matriculate at medical schools around the US want to stay, and make it through. NYCOM is the only school where you have such an infamous high attrition rate, where people actually worry about failing, and do. Let's hope next year the school makes changes and accepts less students. Because accepting more than 300 but expecting to graduate less than 270 is not really transparent or fair, is it.
 
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DrWBD

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An outsider perspective: NYCOM has been in a downward spiral for the last 10 years. The previous dean and company basically watched and did nothing as TOURO-COM and Hofstra-NSLIJ were established and began encroaching on their rotation sites. At the same time, changes in the healthcare environment resulted in the closure of the underperforming hospitals in the New York metro area that comprised many of the NYCOM core rotation sites. I saw a list of the current sites the school is sending their students (think community-level hospitals 2 states away) for core rotations and shook my head.
 
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An outsider perspective: NYCOM has been in a downward spiral for the last 10 years. The previous dean and company basically watched and did nothing as TOURO-COM and Hofstra-NSLIJ were established and began encroaching on their rotation sites. At the same time, changes in the healthcare environment resulted in the closure of the underperforming hospitals in the New York metro area that comprised many of the NYCOM core rotation sites. I saw a list of the current sites the school is sending their students (think community-level hospitals 2 states away) for core rotations and shook my head.
Saint barnabas in the Bronx and Maimonides in Brooklyn are two of their rotation sites and are neither far away or "community level hospitals"
 

DrWBD

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St.Barnabas actually is a glorified community hospital, and I wouldn't count on Maimonides taking very many NYCOM students in the near future, given their affiliations with Mount Sinai and Albert Einstein, as well as the Caribbean schools paying $$$ for rotation sites.

You miss the point of my comments. Those sites were around when I was a student also. But NYCOM also had lots more sites at much better hospitals that have faded away in the last decade.
 
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NYCOM requires a one year sequence of English. does this mean that you have to take English 101 and English 102? Can you take Writing 101 and English 220? Will these two courses not satisfy the english requirements?

i would appreciate feedback from current students
 
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St.Barnabas actually is a glorified community hospital, and I wouldn't count on Maimonides taking very many NYCOM students in the near future, given their affiliations with Mount Sinai and Albert Einstein, as well as the Caribbean schools paying $$$ for rotation sites.

You miss the point of my comments. Those sites were around when I was a student also. But NYCOM also had lots more sites at much better hospitals that have faded away in the last decade.
I hear you. I am def disappointed in the way the school has gone I the past decade. But my point is that the school still has affiliations with some good hospitals. Plus we have a new dean that is very motivated. I think if you are a good student with motivation to seek out the best opportunities you will still get a good clinical education at nycom.