futuredoctor10

10+ Year Member
Jan 25, 2007
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So I wanted to make sure I have the differences covered.

Animal viruses attach to a receptor protein to recognize the host cell, enter the host cell via endocytosis, and bring their capsid into the host cell.
[i did not know the bolded part is true: is it?]

Bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, also attach to a receptor on the host cell membrane, but enter by landing/attachment/contracting/penetrating and injecting.

Is it true bacteriophages leave their capsid outside, animal viruses bring their capsid into the cell, but both have receptor-specific methods of attachment?
 

cbrons

Ratatoskr! *Roar*
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Jul 29, 2007
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DEFEND MIDDLE LANE!
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So I wanted to make sure I have the differences covered.

Animal viruses attach to a receptor protein to recognize the host cell, enter the host cell via endocytosis, and bring their capsid into the host cell.
[i did not know the bolded part is true: is it?]

Bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, also attach to a receptor on the host cell membrane, but enter by landing/attachment/contracting/penetrating and injecting.

Is it true bacteriophages leave their capsid outside, animal viruses bring their capsid into the cell, but both have receptor-specific methods of attachment?
Yes... animal viruses enter the cell via endocytosis. They don't really have a "capsid" like you would see on a T even or lambda phage... instead their outer protenaecous covering comes in different packages... retroviruses, for example, have an envelope-like structure. Some bacteriophages are specific for certain strains of bacteria, some are not. Retroviruses found in animals, such as HIV, are receptor specific (in the case of HIV, it attaches to the CD4 protein found on helper T cells).
 

StIGMA

Doctor Professor
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Jul 6, 2008
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So I wanted to make sure I have the differences covered.

Animal viruses attach to a receptor protein to recognize the host cell, enter the host cell via endocytosis, and bring their capsid into the host cell.
[i did not know the bolded part is true: is it?]

Bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, also attach to a receptor on the host cell membrane, but enter by landing/attachment/contracting/penetrating and injecting.

Is it true bacteriophages leave their capsid outside, animal viruses bring their capsid into the cell, but both have receptor-specific methods of attachment?
All that you said is generally true. There are certainly exceptions in each category, as with most things in biology (from [http://bioinfo.bact.wisc.edu/themicrobialworld/AnimalViruses.html]: occasionally non enveloped viruses leave their capsid outside the cell while the genome passes into the cell).
 
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patvim

10+ Year Member
May 11, 2008
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Pre-Pharmacy
So I wanted to make sure I have the differences covered.

Animal viruses attach to a receptor protein to recognize the host cell, enter the host cell via endocytosis, and bring their capsid into the host cell.
[i did not know the bolded part is true: is it?]

Bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, also attach to a receptor on the host cell membrane, but enter by landing/attachment/contracting/penetrating and injecting.

Is it true bacteriophages leave their capsid outside, animal viruses bring their capsid into the cell, but both have receptor-specific methods of attachment?

i know its irrelevant, but let me aSK U ,WHERE CAN I GET PRACTICE TEST TO PRACTICE
 
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