1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Download free Tapatalk for iPhone or Tapatalk for Android for your phone and follow the SDN forums with push notifications.
    Dismiss Notice

Walmart peeps, enlighten me on bentonville

Discussion in 'Pharmacy' started by tongiecc, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. tongiecc

    tongiecc Junior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    8
    Hey guys, one of my buddies at the hospital I work at does some Wally world coverage on the side, and said that rph's he talks to that work there full time are freaked out cuz they are really starting to crack down on sending you to bentonville. Basically, they way I understand it is if u make so many errors (I think it's only like 5 or 6 tho), you get a first class trip to bentonville Arkansas to get "trained" on why u suck as a pharmacist. Seems like it's been this way for years cuz I know my buddies that work for Wally have mentioned it has been this way for years, but when there was a shortage it was rarely enforced. Now my buddy says they are enforcing it in full force and there are so many people coming to bentonville that they needed to open up another training center. Plus I heard that if u go 2 years in a row, you're automatically fired. I guess my ? is whether all this is true, and if u guys really think that this might lead to big time turnover at walmarts everywhere/a great excuse to fire people and re hire cheaper desparate new grads? And here I thought walmart was much better than CVS/WAG.
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. tongiecc

    tongiecc Junior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    8
    Seriously? 127 views and no buddy wants to drop some info? Maybe the waltons have a hit squad out there (that they only work 29 hrs/wk to avoid paying benefits) to keep all of you from talkin. Oh well, my interest is waning.
     
  4. owlegrad

    owlegrad Uncontrollable Sarcasm Machine
    Staff Member Administrator Pharmacist 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    20,749
    Likes Received:
    5,011
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    127 views, no one who works at Walmart. :shrug:
     
  5. tongiecc

    tongiecc Junior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    8
    U're probably right owle, oh well I'm sure someone who's in the loop will post something sooner or later.
     
  6. R xxx

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2011
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    8
    My friend just told me last week that you can only make 2 mistakes in one year and then you have to go to Arkansas to be retrained. Then after that, if you make more than documented 2 mistakes in a year...then you're gone. So if you work with an *******, then you're out of luck.
     
  7. p-rog

    p-rog Junior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Messages:
    499
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    Never heard of this, but it sounds dumb considering the average WallyWorld RPh probably makes > 2 mistakes per day just based on their high volume.
     
  8. WVUPharm2007

    WVUPharm2007 imagine sisyphus happy
    Pharmacist 15+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2003
    Messages:
    13,296
    Likes Received:
    2,813
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    This is what's called setting up your targets...then if and when you want, you can shoot them down at any point...

    Very convenient for managers to get rid of people they want gone and can't come up with a good reason to dispose of them...
     
  9. Aznfarmerboi

    Aznfarmerboi Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2005
    Messages:
    2,099
    Likes Received:
    166
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    and to further WVU point, they will keep you if they want you no matter how many mistakes you make.
     
  10. pharmdguru

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2011
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    3
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Tongiecc, thanks for asking a very good question and trying to bring clarity to the mis-informed. I hope this is clarifies the Quality Assurance Program at Walmart.
    1) A qualifying error is a wrong drug, wrong strength, wrong directions, or wrong patient. A Pharmacist has at least 3 opportunities (if following policy) to catch an error-4 pt check, final verify, and counsel. It is not a qualifying error if a Pharmacist catches it before the patient leaves with the prescription. For example, from speaking with a patient during counseling, a pharmacist catches a mistake and corrects it-not an error.
    2) For a training trip to B-ville, a pharmacist has to have 4 qualifying errors in a rolling 12 month period. Each time an error is made, the entire pharmacy team must complete a plan of action to identify what went wrong and how to prevent a repeat.
    3) The 2 day training trip to B-ville is paid for completely by Walmart. The Pharmacist is paid their full wages for time traveling to and from and time spent in class. All airfare, hotel, transportation, and meals are paid for by Walmart.
    4) There is a very high success and retention rate for Pharmacists that go through training. Most come back with a much higher understanding of proper procedures and teach their team these error preventing procedures. A big part of the training is to educate the pharmacist to balance the work load by having techs do tech functions and pharmacists do pharmacists functions.
    5) Walmart has moved the training courses out into the field away from b-ville so that they are easier for Pharmacist to travel too and to expand training classes beyond only those committing errors.
    6) The policy as been in effect for almost 10 year and has ALWAYS been a high priority.
    -It is not a way to get rid of Pharmacist. It's actually a way to save Pharmacist jobs. Most companies just fire, Walmart actually invests in training to help their Pharmacist improve! Oh yeah, and let's not forget are number 1 responsibility as pharmacist-accuracy. The company has spent over half a billion dollars on their computer system that's number one priority is accuracy, not speed, accuracy. The system actually slows the pharmacist down at critical points in which errors occur and prevents short cutting these points for the sake of speed.
    -I find it interesting that when a chain does something to help train pharmacists on preventing errors, educate them on how to manage a team, and protect patients they're demonized as "setting up their target". If a similar situation happens in hospital, it's called a P&T committee and reserved only for "clinicians". Obviously, I'm biased in a positive way towards my company because my overall experience as a Pharmacist has been extremely positive. In 5+ years as a Pharmacist, I had 2 qualifying errors. As a Pharmacist, you will have errors. However, these errors can be limited by having a proper computer system, functions completed according to your position, team work, and most importantly, counseling.
    My goal with this lengthy post is give factual information to those that want to hear the truth. For the rest of you, go ahead and let the conspiracy theory posts continues.
     
    cnicolef08 and winnguyen like this.
  11. Sarapary

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2006
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Good answer..Thanks!
     
  12. taken2

    taken2 Senior Member
    Pharmacist 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pharmacist

    Well put....thanks!!!
     
  13. longtimerph

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Please take into consideration the opinion of a pharmacist who has come out on the short end of the Walmart QA program.
    During my work as a fulltime Walmart floater in 2005-2006, I was charged with 4 errors and sent to Bentonville for the class.
    I was not allowed a copy of the "mistakes", even though it would have been very simple to remove any PHI. Would there not be some value in being able to recall the errors that I was held responsible for?
    The class that I attended was in 2007. During the final session, in one of many that was open to discussion, I asked the official Walmart Pharmacy Trainer about one of my mistakes. It occurred one Sunday morning, in a pharmacy where I had never been before, working with a tech who may or may not have been qualified to perform the job.
    This is what happened. She cleaned the counting tray with alcohol, but she apparently poured it a bit on the heavy side.
    I ask that you keep in mind that this is not conjecture, but rather the conclusion that the tech and I came to within a matter of minutes following the event.
    By not allowing the alcohol to dry completely, a 10mg fluoxetine tablet did not make it all the way through to the bottle. The tablet, miniscule in weight anyway, stuck to the pouring side of the tray.
    The next prescription, and I'm being 100% honest here, was also a white tablet. It seems that it was haloperidol, but it was 6 years ago and, again, I don't have any records to refer to. I had been a pharmacist for over 30 years on this given day, and my memory is usually quite good.
    The alcohol dried after a few more seconds, and the force of the second drug pushed the single fluoxetine tablet into the next bottle, at the bottom according to the patient's father. It was labeled, including auxiliary labels, inside an amber bottle, handed to me for a final visual check.
    This is what I find so interesting. The trainer's initial response, before even discussing the specific mistake, was that she had reviewed my file and that "some" of my 4 mistakes should never have been qualified and that I never should have been sent to the class. But, we were 2 hours from completion, so why worry?
    She was questioned by another RPh who pointed out a specific sentence in the policy manual, which indicated that an error exists if medicines are mixed inside a bottle. She went on to say that no RPh can possibly be expected to notice a single wrong dose, especially of a product that is similar in appearance, inside a bottle of 30 other tablets.
    Granted, I have almost always double-counted controlled substances, whether the Rx was filled by a tech, another RPh or myself. For non-controlled medications, that's different. I can appreciate that some techs would be offended by a RPh doing that. The quantity appeared to be approximately correct, and there was no reason to be suspicious. Certainly, Walmart policy does not encourage emptying out filled vials, as pointed out by the trainer. She mentioned that it was probably a one-in-a-million mistake, and expecting anyone to notice it was beyond any reasonable standard. To the best of my ability, considering the volumes of Rx's that I have checked during my career, it was probably the only time it occured in my previous 500,000 fills.
    I firmly believe that one of the other mistakes that she objected to being qualified was my approval of a Vivelle Patch being input by a tech instead of a Vivelle Dot. Other than the shape, the products are identical. Granted, I can appreciate that a patient had a personal preference, but they were the same price, same delivery system and bioequivalent according to both the manufacturer and the FDA. So, was it serious enough to throw away my career, 4 years later?
    I made very few errors over the next several years. I was never in trouble until late 2010. On that occasion, the district manager told me after the 3rd mistake that I shouldn't worry, because after all, the entire staff was working under an incredible amount of stress. The pharmacy manager had filled a very expensive Rx under her mother's insurance, but was in fact storing and consuming it from inside the pharmacy food refrigerator. She was falsely billing $479 every 21-24 days, as soon as allowed by ins, but always making sure that I was not working on that day.
    I have made a lengthy list of irregularities that occurred during my 5+ years at Walmart, such as outright theft of at least $500 in customer refunds and regular theft of general merchandise. In my 5 years, she never once produced her employee discount card, another clear violation of Walmart policy, requiring an override every single time. She undoubtedly gave it to her brother, who lives 100 miles away. Space prohibits me from listing everything, but suffice it to say, that it was the only dishonest pharmacy environment in which I have ever worked.
    As with the others, the 4th mistake was one of not catching an input error by a tech. It was a faxed Rx, printed out in great detail. Unfortunately, instead of prescribing Effexor XR 75mg, it was written out as Venlafaxine 75mg Controlled-Release blah, blah, blah. I don't recall the exact wording, but it was one occasion on which a doctor's program was more detailed than necessary, and unfortunately, both the tech and I failed to catch it. My bad, no argument.
    What about the Minocycline 50mg Rx that was also entered erroneously? It was entered as 100mg 2 bid instead of 50mg 2 bid. It was placed on hold, and again, it was my bad. I did wrongly approve it.
    This is where my argument comes into play. When this Rx was eventually filled, the Walmart computer flagged it as an overdose. The insurance flagged it as an overdose and would not allow an override. So, what did the other RPh do? She filled a quantity of 60 on insurance and convinced the young lady to pay full price for the other 60. Doing so was not something that happened in a matter of seconds. We routinely called insurance to try for an override. Additionally, it took time to convince the patient (and her mother) that the Walmart and insurance computers were wrong and that this was not a serious overdose.
    Then, she did it again, the next month.
    The 3rd time, I was on duty and started doing the same thing, but quickly realized how wrong it was. I apologized to the girl and her mother and gave her full refunds for the previous fills. These two women were freaked out! She had been made so sick that she had been vomiting every day, for 2 months! Because the other pharmacist insisted that it was correct! I was the only person charged with the error, because Walmart policy does not address the final visual process. At least, that's what the DM told me.
    The 2nd mistake of this group of 4 was a Nitroglycerin Ointment .2% BID to anus. I wasn't even there on the day that it was brought in. I think most of you will agree that it's not a common Rx these days. It had to be ordered, only it was supposed to have been taken to a compounding pharmacy in the 1st place. The commercially made product is 2%, not .2%.
    My job, on the day that it came in, was to check for accuracy. According to the pharmacist and the DM, had I approved it without checking at all, the blame would have been 100% on the other RPh. But, I did question it. She had input directions of "apply to arms twice a day" instead of anus. Why would anyone apply NTG to their arms?
    I thought it was kind of cool that I caught the mistake, but because I did correct the directions, I was blamed entirely for it being the wrong strength.
    I could tell so many more things, but I realize that this is way too long already. This is the bottom line. Walmart was at that time involved in the Supreme Court hearing over discrimination. This female RPh could have committed murder, and they would have stood up for her. I am the easiest person in the world to work with, except for dishonesty in the workplace. I have no prejudice against females. I do have issues with all dishonest pharmacists, techs, district and regional managers.
    According to the DM, on the night that I was suspended, he and the Regional Manager had been "haggling" for 6 weeks with the Bentonville trainer over my mistakes from 2005-2006. That's right, 6 weeks arguing with a professional, corporate trainer, not over just one mistake but multiple instances.
    I was charged with 4 mistakes and fired. The regional manager implied that he had no choice. So, why was I suspended and promised a fair review? Why did the DM tell me about the other 3 RPh's that he had recently protected from termination? The other RPh made 6 mistakes during the same time frame, but only 1 was reported. Don't forget that it's an honor system. The DM knew, but chose to turn his head.
    I was fired on January 25, 2011. I have only been able to earn $30K during the last 18 months, and my heart condition precludes me from getting life or health insurance. COBRA eligibility is over, and the ACA doesn't allow me to get insurance until 2014, assuming that it's not repealed.They had the ability to disqualify any one of numerous mistakes, but they chose termination instead. Did I mention that she was demoted to staff pharmacist?
    To the extent that the trainers have control, the program is valid. During the class, the trainer constanly reminded us that we were not being punished and that punishment played no role in the program. Outside of that room, the rules are flushed down the toilet, at any given person's discretion. I was the only pharmacy employee there to have a Customer Service Award. I was regularly scored at the top on my evals with respect to customer service and teamwork. On the final eval, I was criticized for not abiding by the 10-foot rule. Bull...
    So, everything that's been written by others up to this point has been both right and wrong. It all comes down to the individual circumstances. They can play either side of the coin, and they most certainly do. Does anyone believe that an RPh with 20 years of excellent service would be fired for making 4 mistakes this year, in addition to 4 from perhaps 15-20 years ago?
    I ask that this post not be deleted. I realize that it's controversial, but sometimes the truth hurts. It has devastated my life. The Colorado Department of Labor approved unemployment, stating that the tech to RPh ratio was illegally high, and that I could not be expected to meet such high standards under the circumstances. Walmart did not contest it. I collected all of $4,000. I didn't file initially, because the store's HR director told me not to, that I had violated company policy.
    No employment lawyer in Denver will even allow me a consultation. Have you ever heard of dozens of lawyers refusing a paid consultation?
    Thank you for your patience. I do appreciate it.
     
  14. hereticmnk

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2009
    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Your story is truly sad :(
    I used to intern at Wal-Mart and a similar thing happened to a pharmacist who worked with the company for 15 years and was sent to corporate for training. He wasn't fired but still... I really hope you find another job and I hope that pays you better than whet you got in the past 18 months and I really really hope no potential employer holds those errors against you.
     
  15. pezdispenser

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2006
    Messages:
    1,481
    Likes Received:
    594
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    @longtimerph
    Wow! Thanks for sharing your story. I feel really sorry for you.

    It must be tough to work for a company that actually terminates pharmacists for making too many errors, but I do see their justification. A corporation as large as Walmart is probably self-insured, so all litigation liability directly affects the company's finances. Therefore, it is in their best interests to have policies and take such a tough stance on pharmacist mistakes.

    We need to always remember that we are compensated a lot for our jobs because with them comes a lot of responsibility (and liability). Yes, there are so many demands (customer service, speed, profitability, etc) that we can be stretched thinly in all directions at once. So we also need to remember to prioritize which demands are most important in keeping our jobs, but also for the health and safety of our patients (see Oath of a Pharmacist).
     
  16. ancienbon

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2010
    Messages:
    673
    Likes Received:
    169
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Hard to believe that. now i know a company that i have to avoid. willl never work for walmart
     
  17. Justherewhynot

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2007
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Forgive me for apparently holding the minority opinion (and I know this is not your point, but others have insinuated it), but if I were a patient, I'd be horrified to know that a pharmacist is NOT being held accountable for serious prescription errors. I work in retail at a quite busy store, and I know I make mistakes....but not wrong drug, wrong patient, or seriously wrong directions. You make 4-5 of those kind of mistakes a year and expect to keep your job? Are you kidding me? With all these new grads just waiting to take your place?

    If you're looking to go into retail and somehow expect to be "protected" from being fired for making too many serious mistakes, I firmly believe you're in the wrong field. You're not there for your knowledge (I mean real stuff, not "where's the Benadryl?"); you're there to be accurate. You want to continue to be a highly-paid monkey? Don't screw up that part! You want to be allowed to make mistakes? Go be a mechanic.

    Also, please don't assume a company such as Walmart is somehow "horrible" because you've read a few stories about firing discrepancies. Those happen in any field and there's always more to the story you don't know. Thousands go through the retraining program for proper reasons and complete it successfully.
     
  18. Momus

    Momus Probationary Status
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Messages:
    2,956
    Likes Received:
    1,244
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Walmart thinks it's easier to brush it off and losing $4000 than making a fuss for such a small amount.

    Lawyers either think it's a no win case or just scared trying to go against Walmart.
     
  19. longtimerph

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    I have some statistics that I would like for you to consider. During a 7-month time frame, dispensing errors reported to the Walmart Corporate Office amounted to slightly over 90,000. Divided by 210 days, that amounts to 429 per day. I understand that Walmart has approximately 5,000 pharmacies in the US, which would amount to .086 errors per pharmacy per day. These are not my figures; they are in the handwriting of a district manager on 2 separate documents, so there's no mistake.

    What I can't prove is whether the 90K is for US stores only, or the approximate 8,500 worldwide. Regardless, it's a staggering number when extrapolated on a yearly basis.

    If every Walmart pharmacist who made 4 errors during rolling 12-month periods was fired, there would not be a Walmart Pharmacy Department. Other chains tried that in the 90's, and really did fire all of those pharmacists, but quickly learned that they wouldn't survive. The math is simple, and numbers don't lie.

    Do you know what it's like to fill 200 Rx's per day, as the only pharmacist, with 4 techs, in a resort area where every 5th person can be a new customer? At least in Colorado, it's an illegal ratio.It was only 2 days after I was fired that Walmart introduced an actual tech training program. I wasn't allowed to participate for even a single day. The State Board knows what's going on. Likewise, the techs know how to suddenly disperse should an inspector arrive. I've been a fulltime Walmart floater, so I know full well that it was not true for just this one store.

    I've noticed that quite a few recent graduates are bitter about baby boomer pharmacists not getting out of the way so that they can have a career. The Walmart where I worked fulltime for 4 years needed another pharmacist, not more techs. That's why the jobs have evaporated, from most of the chains, not just Walmart. That's why Walmart can sell $4 Rx's. They have dramatically driven down the labor costs per Rx filled.

    Would you want your Rx filled in a pharmacy where 4 technicians are surrounding one pharmacist, clamoring for their customers' Rx's to be approved? There were far too many times that it was pure chaos.

    Have you ever worked with a blatantly dishonest pharmacist? It's the most difficult thing I have ever done in my life. Several years ago, a single Walmart tech was supposedly caught placing a narcotic inside her water bottle. Walmart reacted by refusing to allow any tech, anywhere in the country, to drink water, soda or anything else from a can or bottle.

    The quarterly Pharmacy Board report lists the number of pharmacists who have lost their licenses due to drug theft and addiction. But, Walmart made a blanket statement that it's the techs that can't be trusted.

    You're absolutely right that you never know the whole story. What you don't know is that the whole story in my particular case is quickly approaching 30 pages in Microsoft Word.

    When the corporate trainer scoffs at the qualification of 50% of my errors, and argues for 7 weeks in my defense, but probably faced the loss of her own job, then a lot of things are wrong. The people who fired me were not pharmacists. One even argued that the final evaluation of a new or refill Rx was n-o-t an error, that only initial interpretations of the input counted. He doesn't even know pharmacy law. He didn't know that the Rx image pops up during the final review; he thought that I was trying to trick him. It's another reason that pharmacists' jobs have disappeared. You no longer have to be one in order to be a pharmacy supervisor.

    I once respected Walmart, too. In fact, for 4 of the 5 years. I used to brag about their professionalism, until I experienced the dark side.
     
  20. ancienbon

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2010
    Messages:
    673
    Likes Received:
    169
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    I don't think you work in retail. If you believe a pharmacist should be fired for making over 4 mistakes a year, you are really out of touch. While i don't have the statistics to prove it, i can assume a typical pharmacist makes more than 4 or 5 mistakes a year, some of which may never be known,
    Are you kidding me? Have you ever worked in a 24 hours store where you have to give more than 15 shots a day while doing drive thru, and everything? I dont think so .mistakes do happen, some of them may not be fatal. But the fact is it is easy to make 4 or 5 mistakes a year... we must try our best to avoid them.
     
    jkral1102 likes this.
  21. genesis09

    genesis09 Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2,194
    Likes Received:
    155
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    At Wags, you can be fired for making too many errors but the number is way more than 5 per year. Also, not all errors are weighted equally. Some errors are considered to be more severe than others.
     
    jkral1102 likes this.
  22. All4MyDaughter

    All4MyDaughter SDN Mommystrator
    Pharmacist Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2005
    Messages:
    22,792
    Likes Received:
    333
    Status:
    Pharmacist

    I don't think 4 technicians to 1 pharmacist is unreasonable. That's what I always work with, except on Saturdays when we're 3:1. With 4 techs I have one dedicated to input, two filling and one cashier/float. On days when we have a lot of deliveries or nursing home fills, we might have a 5th tech. I'd rather have more techs then less.
     
  23. Smilescali

    Smilescali Almost there...
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Messages:
    623
    Likes Received:
    5
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Who complains about having too much help?? You people say what you want about Walmart. I have worked for several chains and they pretty much are the same in their rules about termination. Walmart I have found gives you the MOST tech help by far. We are always well staffed.. unless there are sick calls.. another story...
     
    tablet likes this.
  24. Justherewhynot

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2007
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Did you note that I said serious mistakes? Wrong name/wrong drug/seriously wrong directions? I'm not talking minor mistakes (refills, 29 instead of 30 pills in a bottle, etc) that all of us sporadically make. You don't get sent to Bentonville over those, unless your DM seriously hates you.

    On a personal note, making the assumption that every pharmacist out there has the same experience and talent level as you shows a serious lack of perspective and wisdom. Some pharmacists really can handle a 300-400 script day flying solo with 4 techs and not make a serious error. Just because you haven't seen it doesn't mean it isn't done.

    I don't care about statistics. I don't care if you believe no pharmacist out there can meet standards of excellence and that "we'd all be fired" if held accountable. Maybe we should. Better than killing someone, isn't it?

    I care about the profession and believe it is our duty to be accurate. Period. I can only hope others out there have the fortitude to also hold themselves to as high a standard as possible.
     
  25. All4MyDaughter

    All4MyDaughter SDN Mommystrator
    Pharmacist Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2005
    Messages:
    22,792
    Likes Received:
    333
    Status:
    Pharmacist

    Right? I don't find four or even five techs overwhelming at all. It's nice! My techs would never "clamor around" me anyway. They are really good about sticking to their stations and communicating info to me about workload and prioritization. I feel really lucky.

    Today I called Harris Teeter in another state for a copy. The pharmacist seemed harried and had to put me on hold to get another line and put them on hold before coming back to me. I think she was working alone. Yuck. :(
     
  26. Justherewhynot

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2007
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe you're referring to the online incident reporting system (IRS). The system that's used not only for reporting serious errors but can (and should, according to WM policy) be used for such things as giving a patient 30 instead of 90 pills, entering the wrong number of refills, etc.,......in other words, all errors, even trivial ones, and not just qualifying errors that get you sent to Bentonville. I would then, of course, not be surprised by the 90,000 number, nor expect all pharmacists to be fired for what could be a large amount of trivial mistakes. Walmart does not fire pharmacists for non-qualifying errors.

    I feel badly for you that things did not end well with Walmart. I know that with big corporations, there is sometimes politics that cannot be controlled by the pharmacist. I wish you well in your future endeavors.
     
  27. Citrix

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    does walmart report your errors to the board of pharmacy?
     
  28. pezdispenser

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2006
    Messages:
    1,481
    Likes Received:
    594
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Actually, I agree with you. I think Wal-mart's policy is tough, but fair and justified.
    I think the Colorado Board of Pharmacy limits it to 3 techs per pharmacist.
     
  29. spacecowgirl

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2004
    Messages:
    2,365
    Likes Received:
    261
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    And just because some people can do that (good for them!), doesn't mean everyone should have to or can. Doesn't make them a lesser pharmacist, just a less efficient cog in the machine.

    All techs are not equal - some being far more help than others, some being a hindrance. Some knowing/doing just enough to be dangerous. Some you wish you could double their salary because they are so totally awesome.

    Longtimerph, I feel for you. I can see how all of those mistakes happened and I'm sorry you were terminated. I wish you luck.
     
  30. All4MyDaughter

    All4MyDaughter SDN Mommystrator
    Pharmacist Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2005
    Messages:
    22,792
    Likes Received:
    333
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Ok. I'm not in Colorado. Do they allow clerks or cashiers? Three techs is not that many, not enough to cover all workstations, especially if there is a drive thru.
     
  31. rxlea

    rxlea Almost a unicorn
    Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Messages:
    13,248
    Likes Received:
    198
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    I agree! Anyone that has work experience can second this; some techs will go the extra mile and others will do the bare minimum (if that).

    It's about the team.
     
  32. Ackj

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2008
    Messages:
    2,463
    Likes Received:
    284
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    It's 2:1 in NY, but that doesn't include interns or clerks/cashiers. It's rather hard to say what the difference is between a tech and a clerk, since there is a great deal of overlap. I suppose it makes sense, since you want to be sure you can keep an eye on everybody, and the more things you have to keep track of, the harder it can be.
     
  33. longtimerph

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Thanks for sharing your feelings on this subject.

    You see, even I'm divided on the various issues. The program certainly has its merits, but the outcomes for individual circumstances can be incredibly different. In particular, what about the staffs of 2-3 RPh's who make so many errors that they don't dare report them?

    In my experiences there, one statement in particular stands out. The trainer took pride in her job with one notable exception. She had a strong conviction that the pharmacists should receive the training immediately upon being hired rather than waiting until they had made 4 errors.

    According to her, most pharmacists eventually attend the class, so why not be proactive rather than reactive? She repeatedly assured us that her intent was to not punish anyone in the room, but the truth of the matter was that every single one of us walked away from B-ville, a whopping 50% on our way to being fired for the remainder of our careers there.

    Would it not be better for the WM QA program to be known as "Incredibly Effective" instead of "Very Strict"?

    What about that one person whose life may have not been harmed or lost had the pharmacist been trained on Connexus before the error instead of after? I'm not suggesting that the company should train anyone "to be" a pharmacist.

    No company should be expected to do that. Instead, the companies should train them to be the best that they can, given that they are working on a computer system that is likely different from any other program they have used, and of course, working under pressure more often than not.

    We all know that most retail pharmacy errors are fortunately not life-threatening, but what about the few that are? Do those patients not deserve the best-trained pharmacists possible?

    Only one semi-sarcastic point, and then I will be gone. Pharmacists who believe that they only commit minor errors have either been lucky, or they're just kidding themselves.Please don't forget that many pharmacy errors are never detected. CSI investigations do exist, but only to a limited extent.

    People do die from the taking the wrong drug, with no one ever realizing it. One cannot believe that last year's estimated 1.6 million errors were all of no consequence, not to mention committed solely by "bad pharmacists"..
     
    jkral1102 likes this.
  34. joetrisman

    Pharmacist 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,869
    Likes Received:
    14
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    I found this thread quite amusing come last weekend as my case project for the week in MBA ethics class was about Walmart. The short of the long that I got out of it was that Walmart was pretty awesome when Sam Walton was still running things but took a huge nose dive when he died.
     
    jkral1102 likes this.
  35. rxlea

    rxlea Almost a unicorn
    Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Messages:
    13,248
    Likes Received:
    198
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    That sums it up perfectly. Sam Walton's offspring are trolls
     
  36. Farmercyst

    Farmercyst From the shadows
    Pharmacist Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    Messages:
    7,860
    Likes Received:
    6
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    In retail, CA is 1:1 for the first RPh, 2:1 thereafter, with pretty much unlimited ancillary staff. I usually work with3-4 CPhTs, but only the one filling (doing tech duties) counts toward the ratio. (some exceptions apply)
     
  37. Ruck101

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pharmacy Student
    I heard a rumor that the policy has changed to three errors? Can anyone confirm this?
     
  38. crazybob

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    Messages:
    7,402
    Likes Received:
    8
    Why not ask people at your school who work at Walmart? Do you not trust them?
     
  39. Angela1234

    Angela1234 Still Looking for Work

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2012
    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    20
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    I heard Rite Aid has a three mistakes and your out policy. Does anyone know anything about Rite Aid?
     
  40. Ruck101

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pharmacy Student
    I did. Nobody knew for certain. That's why I asked here. Thanks, though. A**hat much?
     
  41. owlegrad

    owlegrad Uncontrollable Sarcasm Machine
    Staff Member Administrator Pharmacist 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    20,749
    Likes Received:
    5,011
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    No, not an A**hat much. If you read something of crazybob's that way it is clear you don't know crazybob.
     
  42. BidingMyTime

    BidingMyTime Lost Shaker Of Salt
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Messages:
    3,190
    Likes Received:
    2,135
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    I don't believe it, because it is not possible. NO human being goes without mistakes. None. This is why many critical jobs (such as building buildings, setting off spacecraft) require work to be double or tripled checked by more than 1 person. And this is in jobs that do not require spur of the moment decisions during a multitude of interruptions and distractions. It doesn't matter how good you are, or how conscientious you are. If you really think you are perfect, then you really should be ruling the world or something. At least apply to get your name Guinness book of world records. One study has found "iatrogenic disease" to be the 3rd leading cause of death in the US. Do you really believe this huge number or errors are caused by just a few bad apples, and not by every health-care worker in general (and that is just the errors that caused harm to the pt, many "serious" errors are caught by the pt before any harm is done.)?

    The problem with "accountability" of a punitive sort, is that this encourages people to hide mistakes, and this benefits no one. Not the pt who may not receive adequate treatment because the error was hidden, nor any other medical professional who could have learned from that reported error. That is why the ISMP encourages voluntary, non-punitive reporting of errors--so people can learn what kind of mistakes are common, be aware of them, and try to develop strategies to prevent them (ie tall man letters on bottles, separating sound-alike/look-alike drugs on shelfs, etc.)
     
  43. pharmdgirl522

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2014
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    I will say that I did wish the system was set up so very old mistakes were logged, but if you had addressed the core issue already - then it wouldn't count towards your overall numbers. Just had to resign for an old event that was missed on two separate scripts (two different pharmacists missed the same thing - very confusing script but a misfill nonetheless). Tried to work with district manager on at least three separate occasions to get out of the store I was in to gain experience/confidence (high volume, short-staffed, drive-thru, high turnover as well) but to no avail. Should've found a new job earlier. So high stress I think it caused my miscarriage. Hindsight is 20/20 though. You live and you learn.
     
  44. Sunshine98

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2014
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    60
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Have a friend who works for Wal-mart and she deals with a lot of politics. The error process is voluntary, in that you have to communicate with your DM that one has occurred and then pro-cede
    to fill out information about it.
     
    #43 Sunshine98, Feb 18, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2014
  45. Gombrich12

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2013
    Messages:
    489
    Likes Received:
    402
    You made a single mistake and had to resign or was it a number of mistakes and that was the final one? Also, why did you resign? If you're fired you still can still try to get unemployment at least and maybe they won't fight it.
     
  46. icekitsune

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    8
    Any new update on this? I got into a situation where I had to fill out an scrt for a days supply issue and another one for drug. I'm a bit worried that i'm going to be sent to this place. I know nothing about it if its any 3 mistakes logged in or it depends on specific mistakes.Is this within a year of hiring? Since I'm pt, maybe i'll just be terminated?
     
  47. pharmdgirl522

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2014
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Had 4 mistakes in one year as a new pharmacist in a high volume store (450 per day on a typical weekday). Went to the "retraining" in Dallas. was then only allowed two mistakes for the next year. Mistake was made by another pharmacist on vitamin d2 vs. d3. Confusing e-script, but written up for her anyways. Dr's office was called and escripting was changed to eliminate the possibility of the error again. Techs/pharmacists were also trained to watch out for it.
    Same mistake was found on an older script that I had checked. It was my second error for that year. I resigned that hour and it was written up after I resigned.
    I am now an expecting another child an have a wonderful hospital job that I love!
     
  48. trailerpark

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2013
    Messages:
    1,332
    Likes Received:
    672
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    It's a rolling one year. Days supply is a mistake? Doesn't that only affect the insurance billing?
     
  49. Momus

    Momus Probationary Status
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Messages:
    2,956
    Likes Received:
    1,244
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    This is what happen to other chains as well. I have seen a lot of errors by my older manager that somehow didn't get reported. If someone is angry, do the report 100%.
     
  50. Jibby321

    Jibby321 Ready or Not......
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2013
    Messages:
    1,645
    Likes Received:
    396
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    You filled out a report for DS?
     
  51. icekitsune

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    8
    i had to but it's labeled as non qualifying when i checked it today. So I wanted to make sure if it the information above is still correct and that you need to have more than 3 mistakes and considered to be qualifying to be sent to retraining. not just whatever was sent to scrt, u know? If so, then the DS one will not really count.
     
    #50 icekitsune, Aug 9, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2014

Share This Page