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water and density

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superduper12

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when water becomes ice, it's density decreases and ice floats.

when water is heated, it's density decreases and it rises up....seems weird that density decreases when water gets cold and hot.
 

Kaustikos

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    when water becomes ice, it's density decreases and ice floats.

    when water is heated, it's density decreases and it rises up....seems weird that density decreases when water gets cold and hot.
    Not really. when you heat the water up, the volume it encompasses increases - thus decreasing the density. I can't remember what the deal with the frozen water is though, sorry.
     

    Jorje286

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    Not really. when you heat the water up, the volume it encompasses increases - thus decreasing the density. I can't remember what the deal with the frozen water is though, sorry.

    In cold water, water molecules slip above each other, which makes the volume even smaller than in ice (which is basically water crystals).
     

    Phlame217

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    Its h-bonding, the prime place it occurs in water, hence the water molecules draw closer and are more dense.

    When water freezes, it forms crystal lattices which expand and prevent h-bonding and therefore its less dense.

    When water evaporates, its a gas and obviously is less dense.
     

    superduper12

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    alright will take H bonding into account for ice and more KE energy (expansion) of molecules for water as it's heated....thanks.
     
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