WELCOME NYCOM CLASS OF 2004!

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by AMS-007, Jun 28, 2000.

  1. AMS-007

    AMS-007 Member

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    For those of you who have recently been accepted to the NYCOM Class of 2004, WELCOME AND CONGRATULATIONS!!! YOU DID IT!!!

    I had posted a thread similar to this earlier, but if you didn't get a chance to see it or didn't get a chance to write, here is a another chance for you.

    If you have any questions or concerns about NYCOM or the first year (and even the second year) lets bring them out here. I'll do my best to answer any questions that you may have. As a suggestions, you can ask about books, microscopes, orientation, the white coat ceremony, faculty, administration, the infamous Monday morning exams, et cetera, et cetera.....
    Your choice!!

    Again, WELCOME TO ALL OF YOU and CONGRATULATIONS!!!

    Amit
    NYCOM, Class of 2002

     
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  3. zilberman

    zilberman Junior Member

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    What do you mean by infamous monday morning exams?
    I have another question about the general class lectures. Do professors give you the lecture notes or do you have to write down everything they say as fast as you could. The exam material comes from only the lecture material, or you have to go through texts to learn the details. Are curtain texts required, or do you just find a book that you like and stick with it.


    i Assume that you just started your clinical rotations and i have a question reguarding that. When you schedule your 3rd year rotation does the school choose what is the order the rotations are in and where are they or do you have any freedom and can choose the hospitals, and how is that different from the 4th year.
     
  4. To all of u who are not going to NYCOM and have not sent in your replys PLEASE do- some of us are on the waiting list and really, really want to go to NYCOM!!!!!!

    Good Luck to all..
     
  5. AMS-007

    AMS-007 Member

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    Zilberman,

    When I say "the infamous Monday morning exams" I mean just what it sounds like. Their on a Monday morning (around 9 AM and sometimes even 8 AM) and you end up taking an exam every Monday starting four to five weeks after you first day of class. They usually run about three hours. This happens because most first year subjects have two or three exams and usually you end up rotating through exams. If one week you took the 1st Histo test, the next week you'll take the 1st Biochem test and the third week you'll take the 1st physio test. By the time you get to the 4th week it will be time to take your 2nd histo test and the week after that you'll take your 2nd Biochem test and it goes on and on almost every Moday until you finish all the subject for the year. DOESN'T THAT SOUND FUN!!! YEPEEE....... But that's life in med school, NOT JUST NYCOM!! You just get used to it after a while (at least I did).

    As for the books, the faculty will tell you to buy books until they're stacked from your head to your toe, but they also give you class notes which are sufficient enough to help you get by. Most of the material (about 80% to 90%)on the test will come from the notes and the remainder from the texts. If you want Honors placed on your transcript, you'll have to study the text too. But usually most people already have enough to read from the notes and they don't bother going to the text.

    As for the third year... the process of assigning rotations to people takes into consideration both the desire of the students to go to particular hospital and the availability of the spot. There are six rotations during the third year: Medicine and Surgery (are for 12 weeks each) and OB/GYN, Pediatrics, Psychiatry and Family Practice (are for 6 weeks each). Each rotation has a list of hospitals offering that rotation. The student has to rank these in the order of his preference from highest to lowest. The student also gives preferences about when he/she wants to do a particular rotation. All of this ranking takes place at a special website that NYCOM has created. The preferences are fed into computer. Once all the students have submitted their preferences, the lottery takes place. The computer keeps in mind what the student wants and the availability of the spots and assigns them in that fashion. If two or more students have chosen the same hospital in the same time slot, then the computer takes into consideration how many times each particular student has received the hopital that he/she wanted and them gives it to the student who has gotten the hospital of their choice the least number of times. If they all have gotten their hospital preferences an equal number of times, then the computer assigns them randomly to the spot. Once the lottery is complete the Assistant Dean of Clincal Education (Dr. Jeger) reviews the results and releases them to the students. Once the students have their clerkship sites, they can opt to trade them with each other as long as they are in the same time slot. Once the trading in complete, everything is a done deal. Assuming the student has completed all courses in the second year satisifactorily, the third year begins on July 5th.

    Amit
    NYCOM, Class of 2002
     
  6. AMS-007

    AMS-007 Member

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    Melon,

    Your comment is duely noted! JUST HOLD ON! NYCOM pulls people off their lists up until a few days before orientation which is the last week in August. Just as a FYI, I spoke with Mr. Schaefer about the waiting list a week ago and he said that there were approximately 50-60 people on the Accept/Hold List and another 50-60 people on the Alternate List. The people on the Accept/Hold list would be offered seats (if they become available) before the people on the Alternate List.

    Good luck.

    Amit

     
  7. Amit:

    Thank you for your creation and contribution on this thread thus far! Your explanation about the examinations and 3rd year clinical rotations was extremely informative.

    I find it industrious that NYCOM (and I imagine other Medical Schools also) would arrange the rotations in such a fashion that all the students receive the opportunity to visit as many hospitals allowable; the good programs aren't restricted to a particular group of students. I also admire the resourcefulness of the school to provide a website where all the ranking and scheduling could take place.

    What can you tell me about the strengths of each particular program (and I recognize that you'd probably rely on the advice of your upperclassmen to compose a response) including St. Clare's, Massapequa, Wyckoff Heights, Maimonides, and St. Barnabas? I'd appreciate the help. [​IMG]
     
  8. AMS-007

    AMS-007 Member

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    Vegeta,

    There is not much I can say about the strengths of the rotations at this moment because my first rotation (in pediatrics) won't be until next Wednesday (July 5th). But I will tell you what I have heard from the other students. According to the rumors that have floated the following hospitals are the best for each of the rotations.

    Pediatrics: Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Maimonides Medical Center, Nassau County Medical Center

    Medicine: North Shore University Hospital at Manhasset, North Shore University Hospital Forest Hills, Maimonides Medical Center and Nassau County Medical Center

    Psychiatry: Long Island Jewish Hospital, St. Barnabas (Bronx), Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, Nassau County Medical Center

    Surgery: Long Island Jewish Hospital, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, and North Shore Hospitals

    Family Practice: Long Beach Medical Center, St. Barnabas (Bronx), Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center, Massapequa General Hospital

    OB/GYN: Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center, Nassau County Medical Center

    Please remember that what I have written above is what I heard from other members of my class and upperclassmen. Just because a hospital is not listed does not mean that it is not good. It just means that I didn't meet someone who went to that hospital. When it comes time for you to make your selections, just keep your ears and eyes open. The best and most useful news often travels as whispers.

    Amit

    [This message has been edited by AMS-007 (edited 06-29-2000).]
     
  9. zilberman

    zilberman Junior Member

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    What happens if the hospital is pretty far from where you live, do they provide a room in the hospital? How about the hospitals in the brooklyn, NJ and bronx, do you have to live in the hospital room, how do you manage to commute from distant sites?


    thanx to all the students who help out the incoming NYCOM students.
     
  10. AMS-007

    AMS-007 Member

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    zilberman,

    There are some people in my class who were assigned to hospitals located in upstate New York, as well as Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The hospitals often provide housing, but sometimes you are on your own. The best that some hospitals can do is give you a few leads to where you might find apartments for rent. If you call them in advance they might even reserve an apartment for you. Generally as far as parking, housing and meals go, NYCOM leaves the details up to the hospitals. If they are provided for medical students from other schools, interns and residents then you will also get the same privileges. As far as on call nights go, you are expected to use intern/resideent quarters if they are available for you. I am assuming that interns and residents get first preference as far as availability goes. When you are a third year or fourth year student you are truely part of the hospital culture and environment and you will be treated in such fashion. Sometimes one has to let go of the creature comforts that one has become accustomed to during the first few years. Sleep, comfort and convenience become luxuries, instead of necessities when you are a student.

    A third year student will spend 12 weeks per rotation for two rotations, Medicine and Surgery. If you are lucky enough to have the same hospital for both rotations then you will be spending a total of 6 months in the same hospital. This means that you won't have to move around as much. If this hospital is close to your home and they provide parking and meals, then you will most assuredly live like a king in comparison to your fellow classmates who may be roughing it somewhere else. If you were assigned to two separate hospitals which are far from each other, then you will either have to convince one of you classmates to trade hospitals with you or make the best of it.

    The other 4 rotations are for 6 weeks each. If they are at different hospitals which are far from each other then you will end up moving around every 6 weeks (which is unfortunate). On the other hand you still have the option of finding a person who will trade hospitals with you.

    This all seems very random (and to some extent it is) and inconvenient (which it sometimes is), but it somehow it all tends to come together in the end. MOST people are satisfied with their rotation sites because they usually end up getting one of their top 4 choices for a majority of the rotations. I myself got one of my top two choices for 4 out of the six rotations. For the other two rotations, I got my 6th choice and my 8th coice. Which is still not bad because they're still within a twenty mile radius from where I live. So fear not, it is not as terrible as it sounds. It's actually kind of fun.

    Amit
    NYCOM, Class of 2002

     
  11. amit-

    what are my chances if i'm on the accept/hold list at this point.... i mean wasn't the deadline may 15th for those w/ multiple accetances to send in the notification notices?

    also- why put an applicant on the accept/hold list so late in the game?
     
  12. AMS-007

    AMS-007 Member

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    melon,

    I think you're chances are still good because the Admissions office takes people of the Accept/Hold list until the last week in August. Although Mr. Schaefer may have a different opinion. It also depends where you rank among the 50 to 60 people on that list. Obviously, the closer you are to the top of that list the better are you're chances. It would help your chances if Mr. Schaefer was reminded of you're interest in NYCOM. Give him a call or write him a letter. If he is not available speak with Rodika Zaica (Assistant Director of Admissions). When push comes to shove, its the people who've taken the time to show genuine interest that usually are sent the famed certified acceptance letter.

    The reason that NYCOM puts people on the Accept/Hold list even late in the cycle is that they never want to run out of people on that list. They always want to keep eligible candidates in the active file as long as it is possible. So, if for some crazy reason they have a mass withdrawal from a class, they have candidates who can fill those seats.

    Although I'm sure the people with multiple acceptances have already made their choice, it is the people who are on the waiting list at other schools and on NYCOM's waiting list that are holding up the list at NYCOM. They won't give up their spot on NYCOM's list until they are accepted to a school where they are interested in going. Other candidates may just be careless and keep their name active in the NYCOM waiting list even though they have been accepted to another school and have accepted the offer. After all, one can never have too many acceptance letters. Its quite a boost to ones ego.

    Amit

    [This message has been edited by AMS-007 (edited 07-03-2000).]
     
  13. AMS-007

    AMS-007 Member

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    TO ALL WHO HAVE BEEN RECENTLY ACCEPTED TO NYCOM:

    NYCOM has set up a special "New Student Orientation" page on its webboard. You should go visit the page because it has some valuable info about course required books and messages from course directors.

    PLEASE VISIT: http://stanley.nyit.edu/~nycommunity

    PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS PAGE WILL ASK FOR LOGIN NAME AND PASSWORD. IN LOGIN NAME, ENTER YOUR FIRST INITIAL AND LASTNAME AS ONE WORD. IN THE PASSWORD, ENTER YOUR ENTIRE SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER (WITHOUT THE DASHES). IF YOUR NAME AND SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER HAVE BEEN ENTERED INTO THE SYSTEM AND YOU ARE IN FACT AN ACCEPTED STUDENT, THE SITE WILL GRANT YOU ACCESS.

    If you have any trouble accessing the site, send me your name and e-mail address to: [email protected]

    I will forward the info to your e-mail address.

    ADDITIONALY: Visit the NEW NYCOM WEBSITE. The address is: http://nycom.nyit.edu

    You don't need to enter anything to visit this site. It is open to everyone.

    PLEASE NOTE:The "www" in the web address has been left out on purpose. It is not a mistake. The same goes for the web board above.

    It has more info for both current, entering and future students. SO EVERYONE IS WELCOME!!
    GO ON AND VISIT BY CLICKING THE HYPERLINK ABOVE!!

    Thanks.

    Amit



    [This message has been edited by AMS-007 (edited 07-03-2000).]
     
  14. Amit:

    NYCOM's bulletin board lists approximately 20 very expensive textbooks for first-year students! Are they crazy?!? How many students actually purchase every one of those "required" textbooks?

    Also, how important is an Omega Zip-drive? Is that something that I should also consider purchasing?

    Thank you for your response.
     
  15. AMS-007

    AMS-007 Member

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    Vegeta,

    Some of them are needed, most of them in MY opinion are not required. For example, if you did not take biochemistry while in college it might be to your benefit if you bought the text. It may provide more of a thorough explanation than the notes that they give you. It might even help you get honors. Don't get me wrong, NYCOM does provide notes for the students, so buying ALL the books is not necessary in my opinion. Although it would be to a students benefit to buy SOME of them. Take everything they tell you with a grain of salt and buy whatever you think will help you the most. If you think you need the book, buy it. If you think you can survive on just the notes, then forget the book. When you get your first set of notes and you read them, you'll have more of a clearer idea of what books you need to get. IN MY OPINION, YOU DON'T NEED THE BOOKS FOR THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS OR EVEN THE FIRST WEEK. You should attend the class during the first week with the notes they gave you and see how much you need to add to the notes. If they are more or less comprehensive, then you can forget the book.

    As far as Omega Zip drives go, NYCOM was not requiring them when I entered two years ago. So, I did not have to buy one. Although, I did have to buy a computer that had Windows 95 or 98 because I previously owned a Macintosh. I think you ought to wait on buying the zip drive (if you plan to buy it) and see what everyone else does. When you go to the orientation, you'll find out all the MUST haves.
    BOTTOM LINE:

    1)DON'T WORRY, THEY ARE NOT GOING TO KILL YOU IF YOU DON'T BUY ALL THE REQUIRED MATERIAL.

    2)BUY WHAT YOU THINK YOU NEED.


    Amit

    [This message has been edited by AMS-007 (edited 07-04-2000).]
     
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  17. togo

    togo Senior Member

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    I finished the first year and never had need of a zip drive. There are also some books that you shouldn't do without (like Robbins for Path) and other you probably won't ever use (I never took Biochem in undergrad and got by w/out a text). Just hold on for now. You'll figure it all out as you go. You'll also get lots of advice from people like me. Some of it will be valuable and some will be useless. You'll have to be the judge of that. Just take things as they come, listen to advice, but, in the end, you'll probably have better judgement than any of us.
     
  18. AMS-007

    AMS-007 Member

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    I'm agree with togo. What books you need to get depends on how much help you need to understand the material. Listen to what other people say (some people will have a lot to tell you), but in the end you decide what you want. Once you start classes and you get "in to the groove", you will know what to get. If you still don't know, I'm sure they'll be plenty of people to point you in the right direction.

    Amit

    Amit
     
  19. To Amit and togo:

    After reading through the Orientation Packet for the 2004 class, I'm confused about the Immunization Form. Are incoming students required to see their personal PC-doctor and have him/her complete the Physical Exam, or are new NYCOM students provided with this service once enrolled? What were you required to do about your Immunization before being allowed to register for classes?

    P.S. If I am required to have my doctor perform a Physical Exam, is there a deadline date stating when I need to return the Immunization Form this summer? (Also, to what Office should I return this form?)
     
  20. AMS-007

    AMS-007 Member

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    vegeta,

    When I first entered NYCOM, I went to see my own family doctor for my physical. So, you don't need to see a doctor at NYCOM for your physical, you can go to your own private doc if you wish.

    As for the immunizations, you should bring a copy of your immunization record with you when you go visit your family doctor. He or she will fill out the upper part of the health form (the immunization part) in addition to the bottom portion (which is the physical). If you don't have a copy of your immunization record, tell your doctor to perform a titer for all the required immunization (MMR, DTP, Varicella, etc). You don't have to worry about the Hepatitis right now. But you will need the Hepatitis immunizations before you enter the third year. If you have a titer done, make sure to include a copy of the results with the health form.

    Since you need to have a PPD done make sure you visit your doctor well in advance of your enrollment at NYCOM because once a PPD is placed it takes 48 to 72 hours before it can be read. If you were born outside the U.S. and you were given a BCG vaccine, then you will be PPD positive. Therefore, in addition to the PPD, your doc will also need to do a chest x-ray.

    Once all the items are complete you will probably have to mail the form to either the Student Affairs Office or the Immunizations Office. Call Dr. DiGiovanna's Office (Student Affairs Office) to find out where to send the form.

    Amit

    [This message has been edited by AMS-007 (edited 07-15-2000).]
     

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