What are the most high yield topics in Anatomy, Physiology + Biochem for Step 1?

Feb 11, 2010
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For example I heard the brachial plexus is high yield in anatomy. What else is high yield in anatomy (and neuroanat), phys and bchem?
 

vicinihil

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All of physiology is high yield. Can't stress knowing the BRS Phys book backwards and forwards enough! I had countless questions on GI physiology, action of hormones, etc.

Neuroanatomy wise, know your blood vessels and how different areas of the brain correlate to pathology. Left sided stroke vs right sided stroke, where is brocas, wernickes, where is the defect in Huntington's, etc. Knowing all the different parts of the thalamus and obscure pathways and brain slices like red nucleus is overkill. Knowing where the CN originate is important but to id them on brain slices may or may not be necessary depending on the test you get.

Biochem- use UCV Biochem and then you're set

Anatomy- Brachial plexus and the arm nerves are the most high yield. Some CT reading required but VERY basic. Legs are less tested but again depends on the test you get.
 

Rollo

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Anatomy- Brachial plexus and the arm nerves are the most high yield. Some CT reading required but VERY basic. Legs are less tested but again depends on the test you get.
Saw that pelvic anatomy started showing up more and more in recent test takers (or at least, that's what I saw in few posts in Step I experiences thread). Would that be high-yield? Or too complicated to invest any time into it?
 

Merrily

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Saw that pelvic anatomy started showing up more and more in recent test takers (or at least, that's what I saw in few posts in Step I experiences thread). Would that be high-yield? Or too complicated to invest any time into it?
Ugh! Yeah dude. Pelvic anatomy and the darn lower limb anatomy too! I blissfully ignored both and just stuck with first aid on that. Missed a good 3 questions because I had NO idea what the heck was going on! I brushed through Kaplan anatomy....apparently wasn't a good enough brush!
 
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Can anyone mention what is a good source of Anatomy for the test? I have done kaplan before so would you suggest that it is a good source if done thoroughly? thx
 

Rollo

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Can anyone mention what is a good source of Anatomy for the test? I have done kaplan before so would you suggest that it is a good source if done thoroughly? thx
Heard BRS Anatomy is good too. It can get a little detailed at times but focusing on the end of chapter summaries and doing the questions are supposed to be pretty helpful.
 

WellWornLad

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Saw that pelvic anatomy started showing up more and more in recent test takers (or at least, that's what I saw in few posts in Step I experiences thread). Would that be high-yield? Or too complicated to invest any time into it?
I wouldn't waste too much time on it unless you did very well in anatomy and feel like you could master the material again with a quick focused review. The pelvic anatomy questions I got were among the toughest I had on the entire exam, and short of spending a couple days just on pelvic anatomy I'm not sure I would have been confident in my answers.

Definitely spend some time on anatomy as a whole, however. Many people I know were destroyed by anatomy. I did well, but would have done spectacularly well if my performance in anatomy matched my performance in just about every other subject. I spent about the same amount of time studying neuroanatomy as I did anatomy and that was a mistake, my neuroanatomy questions were almost insultingly easy (e.g., identify this cranial nerve) compared to general anatomy (e.g., errant contrast dye in a fascial plane of the pelvis on axial CT, identify what section of the urethra the leak is coming from).