letmeinwillya

2+ Year Member
Oct 1, 2015
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Consider me a computer moron, start with basics, I have access to Lynda.com and can learn whatever I need to but I don't necessarily know what I should be learning?

Master power point for presentations? Master the Microsoft Word? How about typing fast? I'm a one finger typist :)
 

RangerBob

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Sep 16, 2012
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I'm not sure what Lynda.com is, but normally just going to college and medical school in the US will mean you pick up everything you will need to be prepared for residency. If you're a non-traditional student and grew up without learning to use a computer, then you likely haven't picked those things up unless your job or personal life required them, though you would likely still need to use them in medical school.

You definitely don't need to "master" PowerPoint or Word, but knowing the basics is essential--you will need to be able to develop at least simple PowerPoint presentations. You should know how to write a CV in MS Word, how to write a manuscript if needed, etc.

You will need to know how to navigate the internet quickly, look up research/review articles.

If you're a one-finger typist I'd say the first thing you should do is take a typing class--right now. There's really no way you will be able to survive in residency if you're hunting and pecking with just one finger. Unless your program still uses paper charts, but many programs that still have paper charts still have some form of EMR (electronic medical record), and I'd anticipate most hospitals with paper charts will be moving to an EMR soon. Most jobs will also involve working at a hospital with some form of EMR, so unless you definitely plan to become a psychiatrist who starts their own practice and write everything by hand, you will need to know how to type.

I'm probably missing a number of things, but the most essential is really learning how to type fast, and then learning how to use the EMR of the program you match into--those are things you need to know and will be using on a daily (really an hourly, or minute) basis and have a huge impact on your efficiency.
 
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gutonc

No Meat, No Treat
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Learn to type and use a mouse. Because there's no other way to order PRN Tylenol for a fever at 4am these days.

But I'm a little confused...shouldn't you have started residency a month ago and already know the answer to this question?
 
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letmeinwillya

2+ Year Member
Oct 1, 2015
216
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@gutonc, thanks for your reply! Yes I have already started the residency and it's going good, I was looking to suggestions to improve the computer knowledge quotient.. we are using EMR, it's online and I'm perfectly comfortable using the computer and EMR systems, I feel at times, I may be slow to type so that's an area I could improve on. I think also knowing keyboard shortcuts comes in handy when navigating the menus and ordering meds..

Learn to type and use a mouse. Because there's no other way to order PRN Tylenol for a fever at 4am these days.

But I'm a little confused...sahouldn't you have started residency a month ago and already know the answer to this question?
 
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letmeinwillya

2+ Year Member
Oct 1, 2015
216
12
Thank you RangerBob! I'm looking to suggestions on how to make my computer skills related to surviving and thriving during residency. Lynda.com is an online service that offers video training for popular computer software. I got the subscription through public library so no out of pocket expenses there.
We are using EMR and I'm an IMG so my training in computer skills may not be same as someone who went to med school in the US but it's decent.
I figured powepoint for presentations and Word for word processing related tasks like creating a report, etc will be essential to learn.

I'm not sure what Lynda.com is, but normally just going to college and medical school in the US will mean you pick up everything you will need to be prepared for residency. If you're a non-traditional student and grew up without learning to use a computer, then you likely haven't picked those things up unless your job or personal life required them, though you would likely still need to use them in medical school.

You definitely don't need to "master" PowerPoint or Word, but knowing the basics is essential--you will need to be able to develop at least simple PowerPoint presentations. You should know how to write a CV in MS Word, how to write a manuscript if needed, etc.

You will need to know how to navigate the internet quickly, look up research/review articles.

If you're a one-finger typist I'd say the first thing you should do is take a typing class--right now. There's really no way you will be able to survive in residency if you're hunting and pecking with just one finger. Unless your program still uses paper charts, but many programs that still have paper charts still have some form of EMR (electronic medical record), and I'd anticipate most hospitals with paper charts will be moving to an EMR soon. Most jobs will also involve working at a hospital with some form of EMR, so unless you definitely plan to become a psychiatrist who starts their own practice and write everything by hand, you will need to know how to type.

I'm probably missing a number of things, but the most essential is really learning how to type fast, and then learning how to use the EMR of the program you match into--those are things you need to know and will be using on a daily (really an hourly, or minute) basis and have a huge impact on your efficiency.