What do schools do after sending out the first round of acceptance letters?

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

yorta

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2021
Messages
55
Reaction score
36
1. Say a school has 100 positions. Do they send out 100 acceptance letters in the first round? If not, how many do they send out on average?

2. If 40 students refuse the offer, does the school send out 40 more in the second round? Are the 40 offers mainly for post-December interviewees, or do they mostly pick down a waiting list they've made for the students who interviewed before 12/15? (say 35 to the pre-December 5 to the post-December interviewee?)

3. How often do schools send out rounds of admission offers on average?

I know schools differ a lot. But I just would like to have some general ideas or insights into how admission works behind the scenes, especially in Texas where I am a resident. I remember there was an article about how the admission committee works in each round. I searched for in all morning, but I couldn't find it.

Thank everyone who replies or comments on this.

Members don't see this ad.
 
1. Say a school has 100 positions. Do they send out 100 acceptance letters in the first round? If not, how many do they send out on average?

2. If 40 students refuse the offer, does the school send out 40 more in the second round? Are the 40 offers mainly for post-December interviewees, or do they mostly pick down a waiting list they've made for the students who interviewed before 12/15? (say 35 to the pre-December 5 to the post-December interviewee?)

3. How often do schools send out rounds of admission offers on average?

I know schools differ a lot. But I just would like to have some general ideas or insights into how admission works behind the scenes, especially in Texas where I am a resident. I remember there was an article about how the admission committee works in each round. I searched for in all morning, but I couldn't find it.

Thank everyone who replies or comments on this.
1 it depends- some send out all, some send out a few more than all the spots knowing some people will decline, some send out fewer than the max

2 it depends- a lot, and there is no way of knowing anyhow

3 the dec 15 group has 30 days to decide, so the next big group happens in the week or so after jan 15, but some schools will accept before the 30 days as people drop out, so it depends...

trust the process...
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Members don't see this ad :)

Attachments

  • F7B5D86B-9B5A-45A8-BE96-E59DEA8F48CE.jpeg
    F7B5D86B-9B5A-45A8-BE96-E59DEA8F48CE.jpeg
    119.6 KB · Views: 109
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
1 it depends- some send out all, some send out a few more than all the spots knowing some people will decline, some send out fewer than the max

2 it depends- a lot, and there is no way of knowing anyhow

3 the dec 15 group has 30 days to decide, so the next big group happens in the week or so after jan 15, but some schools will accept before the 30 days as people drop out, so it depends...

trust the process...
Thank you so much!
 
This is exactly the article I’m looking for. Pure gold. Thank you so much. What is the reason for schools to do this (see screen shot below, the sentence with red underline)?
Does it mean the high academic achievement and interview score is less important than the fitting of the school’s mission statement in this case, or does it mean they know by sending out offers in this order, they will fill their seats more effectively? I imagine the former type of students will usually receive multiple offers thus have the higher possibility of refusing most of the orders in the first round so school need to do more work by sending more offers in the second round. Is this part of the reason for their offering strategy?
 
Does it mean the high academic achievement and interview score is less important than the fitting of the school’s mission statement in this case, or does it mean they know by sending out offers in this order, they will fill their seats more effectively? I imagine the former type of students will usually receive multiple offers thus have the higher possibility of refusing most of the orders in the first round so school need to do more work by sending more offers in the second round. Is this part of the reason for their offering strategy?
Yes, you must understand that decisions are not solely made on metrics alone. Holistic review allows for consideration of best fit with a school's mission to serve its community and constituents. Just because one has high marks and scores does not mean the person would be a great fit at the program. We can go into more discussion of yield protecting later.
 
Yes, you must understand that decisions are not solely made on metrics alone. Holistic review allows for consideration of best fit with a school's mission to serve its community and constituents. Just because one has high marks and scores does not mean the person would be a great fit at the program. We can go into more discussion of yield protecting later.
members here don't like to hear about "yield management"...
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
Yes, you must understand that decisions are not solely made on metrics alone. Holistic review allows for consideration of best fit with a school's mission to serve its community and constituents. Just because one has high marks and scores does not mean the person would be a great fit at the program. We can go into more discussion of yield protecting later.
Thanks for the reply. I thought interview was one of the most important supplements to academics in holistic review process. So I was puzzled why people have both high academic record AND high interview scores will still be waitlisted. I guess then yield protecting is part of the considerations in this case.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Thanks for the reply. I thought interview was one of the most important supplements to academics in holistic review process. So I was puzzled why people have both high academic record AND high interview scores will still be waitlisted. I guess then yield protecting is part of the considerations in this case.
Mission fit is very important. That's all I can say right now (errands and meetings).
 
Mission fit is very important. That's all I can say right now (errands and meetings).
You mean a person with poor mission fit and still get a high interview score? I thought one of the function of interview is to see whether the candidate is a good fit holistically. So how are candidates scored in interviews?
 
You mean a person with poor mission fit and still get a high interview score? I thought one of the function of interview is to see whether the candidate is a good fit holistically. So how are candidates scored in interviews?
Too many hypotheticals to answer you, sorry.
 
Top