What GPA do I need to get into MD, as in, how much can I let it fall?

Nov 13, 2013
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I'm in my junior year at a top university at an age of eighteen. I've rushed life so much, and as a consequence, pushed through my teenage years so fast. Recently I've just started giving up academically...I just don't care anymore. I've never been the star student in college. Freshman year was a struggle for me, and I did absolutely awful academically. Over the past year, I've raised my 2.9 to a 3.4 by maintaining a 4.0 GPA while taking a rigorous science course load. This semester I'm off to a very good start, but I just don't want to work as hard. Not that I haven't had a good amount of fun since starting college, but I feel like it's too soon for me to have the level of responsibilities that I currently have. For instance, this semester, I'm enrolled in a graduate level organic synthesis course. There are no juniors enrolled in that course, and only one regretful senior. All others are in their first or second years in the PhD program. Since I did so well in organic, I thought this course would satisfy as a nice elective (seeing my school doesn't offer advanced organic at the undergrad level). All the love I have for organic is gone after enrolling in this class, and I'm reaching a point where I don't care about any of my classes.

This semester, I'm looking at anything from a 3.6-3.9 in terms of GPA, if I work really, really hard. The thing is, I don't want to. I don't feel like it. I'm too tired. Or, some of you will say that I'm too lazy. If I slack off for the rest of the semester, I can still pull a 3.5. My question is, what GPA do I need to get into allopathic medical school? Luckily, I've already taken the MCAT this past summer. My score was well below my AAMC average, but I guess it's not proper to cry over a 36. I'm also a Texas resident, and an AA male.
 

darkjedi

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with a high MCAT/low GPA you run the risk of falling through the cracks at many schools who can either think this applicant is too good because of the MCAT or not good enough because of the lower GPA

Ideally you should have a 3.7 or above to stand a decent shot at getting into a bunch of schools. Below that and you will find it a struggle to get interviews.

If you are truly burnt out, you should take a few years out from the academic setting and do something else. Whether it's research or a job, or maybe waiting tables to save up money to go travel for a year. There is little question as to why you burnt out, so start taking time to focus on yourself and your own passions.
 

bambam92

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You can't let your GPA "fall" at all--essentially you have no cushion. Your thread title is misleading, "what GPA do I need to get into MD, as in, how much can I let it fall?" When I read I expected to hear a kid with a 3.9 + GPA, but your 3.4 is already on the low end for allopathic schools. I believe national average according to latest MSAR is 3.6. However, your MCAT is strong! This can help compensate for the lower GPA to an extent. But my best advice would be to raise your GPA as much as possible! A 3.7 paired with a 36 mcat will fair well in application cycle!
 

youmed

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Jul 17, 2011
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I'm in my junior year at a top university at an age of eighteen. I've rushed life so much, and as a consequence, pushed through my teenage years so fast. Recently I've just started giving up academically...I just don't care anymore. I've never been the star student in college. Freshman year was a struggle for me, and I did absolutely awful academically. Over the past year, I've raised my 2.9 to a 3.4 by maintaining a 4.0 GPA while taking a rigorous science course load. This semester I'm off to a very good start, but I just don't want to work as hard. Not that I haven't had a good amount of fun since starting college, but I feel like it's too soon for me to have the level of responsibilities that I currently have. For instance, this semester, I'm enrolled in a graduate level organic synthesis course. There are no juniors enrolled in that course, and only one regretful senior. All others are in their first or second years in the PhD program. Since I did so well in organic, I thought this course would satisfy as a nice elective (seeing my school doesn't offer advanced organic at the undergrad level). All the love I have for organic is gone after enrolling in this class, and I'm reaching a point where I don't care about any of my classes.

This semester, I'm looking at anything from a 3.6-3.9 in terms of GPA, if I work really, really hard. The thing is, I don't want to. I don't feel like it. I'm too tired. Or, some of you will say that I'm too lazy. If I slack off for the rest of the semester, I can still pull a 3.5. My question is, what GPA do I need to get into allopathic medical school? Luckily, I've already taken the MCAT this past summer. My score was well below my AAMC average, but I guess it's not proper to cry over a 36. I'm also a Texas resident, and an AA male.
You should take a semester or two off if you feel burnt out. Since you rushed life so much, you can afford to give yourself some time off.
 

Womb Raider

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Aug 20, 2013
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Join a fraternity - one that actually parties (i.e. not an academic one). Socialize. Go to the gym. Play basketball. Party with girls.

I get the feeling you're operating on the polar end of studying in the "study vs. play" spectrum in college. This is fine, and many people stick to either one or the other. However, it's not impossible to do both. Yes, you may have to change your routine up a bit, but change is probably exactly what you need.
 

Stormpelt

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Nov 14, 2013
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I'm in my junior year at a top university at an age of eighteen. I've rushed life so much, and as a consequence, pushed through my teenage years so fast. Recently I've just started giving up academically...I just don't care anymore. I've never been the star student in college. Freshman year was a struggle for me, and I did absolutely awful academically. Over the past year, I've raised my 2.9 to a 3.4 by maintaining a 4.0 GPA while taking a rigorous science course load. This semester I'm off to a very good start, but I just don't want to work as hard. Not that I haven't had a good amount of fun since starting college, but I feel like it's too soon for me to have the level of responsibilities that I currently have. For instance, this semester, I'm enrolled in a graduate level organic synthesis course. There are no juniors enrolled in that course, and only one regretful senior. All others are in their first or second years in the PhD program. Since I did so well in organic, I thought this course would satisfy as a nice elective (seeing my school doesn't offer advanced organic at the undergrad level). All the love I have for organic is gone after enrolling in this class, and I'm reaching a point where I don't care about any of my classes.

This semester, I'm looking at anything from a 3.6-3.9 in terms of GPA, if I work really, really hard. The thing is, I don't want to. I don't feel like it. I'm too tired. Or, some of you will say that I'm too lazy. If I slack off for the rest of the semester, I can still pull a 3.5. My question is, what GPA do I need to get into allopathic medical school? Luckily, I've already taken the MCAT this past summer. My score was well below my AAMC average, but I guess it's not proper to cry over a 36. I'm also a Texas resident, and an AA male.
Oh my gosh! I feel ya!! I am also a junior at 18, and I also started college early to rush through it! But um, if you want to have high chances of getting into an allopathic medical school, you need to aim for at least a 3.6, but preferably a 3.7+. So because of your age, I would suggest to take it easy and slow. If you don't feel like working hard and want to take some time to relax for now, then just take easier classes/an easier course load. Don't jump into graduate level courses and just take courses that are fun and easy ('and' is the key word). That way you can have some more time to relax and take some time to enjoy yourself. You really do need a high GPA for medical school though, so that GPA needs to go up.
 

Stormpelt

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Nov 14, 2013
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Nov 13, 2013
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Thanks for everything. I was just really concerned about an exam I had today. Turns out it went well.
 

wiloghby

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Jun 16, 2012
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You can let it fall by another -0.3GPA before it will hurt you. That is, it's already hurting you. If you really want to approach this as a "bare minimum" process, I'd say a 3.7. But I'd avoid that kind of thinking if at all possible. If you can, just do as others have suggested and take some time off to pursue an EC you are passionate about. Then come back to school revitalized and get 4.0s across the board.

Also, as I don't think it's been said: you don't have to take level 800 courses as a junior. Medical schools won't examine your coursework too closely. If you can take level 300 and 400 courses and breeze through them with great grades, don't subject yourself to the unnecessary stress. Ordinarily I'd say challenge yourself as much as possible, but if you are bordering on burnout then take it easy for a while.