What if doctors were jailed for NP's mistakes

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Taurus

Paul Revere of Medicine
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If a pharmacist could be jailed for his tech's mistakes, why couldn't the same thing happen for physicians who supervise NP's? Think carefully of what can happen to you both professionally and personally when you hire someone who is barely competent clinically like NP's.

Former University Hospitals pharmacist sentenced to six months in jail for 2-year-old's death
Posted by Leila Atassi, The Plain Dealer August 14, 2009 10:32AM

CLEVELAND -- The pharmacist found guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the death of a 2-year old girl was sentenced this morning to six months in jail and six months house arrest.

Eric Cropp of Bay Village also must do community service after his jail sentence. Cropp was ordered to seek out professional groups and tell them his story.

Cropp was the supervising pharmacist at Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital on Feb. 26, 2006, when a pharmacy technician prepared a chemotherapy treatment for 2-year-old Emily Jerry, who was being treated for cancer.

The solution was 23 percent salt when the formula called for a saline base of 1 percent. The child slipped into a coma after receiving the treatment and died on March 1.

As supervising pharmacist, Cropp had the duty of inspecting and approving all work prepared by technicians before it was given to patients.

Cropp was initially charged with reckless homicide but agreed to plead no contest to the lesser charge of involuntary manslaughter.

Emily's mother Kelly Jerry attended the hearing and spoke afterward.

"It will never be over for me and my family," she said. "Mr. Cropp received six months. But six months of his life doesn't compare to what we have to endure for a lifetime."​

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Perhaps the answer is to not hire them?
 
So get this, the pharmacy tech (Katherine Dudash per other articles) did not even get punished for her actions because in that state pharmacy techs dont have to pass certification so they have no legal responsibility. She even worked as a pharmacy tech at CVS until they moved her to a non-pharmacy position. How does that make sense that the person who actually mixes the lethal dose doesn't get punished in the least?

Granted it sounds like this guy wasn't exactly a good pharmacist, apparently after he left the hospital he made 15 more mistakes at 3 different locations before getting fired from his new company. He subsequently lost his license because of this incident and the later mistakes. Hearing about the later mistakes actually makes me feel less sorry for the guy. Honestly, if you were a pharmacist would you let the pharm techs mix lethal drugs like chemo?
 
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So get this, the pharmacy tech (Katherine Dudash per other articles) did not even get punished for her actions because in that state pharmacy techs dont have to pass certification so they have no legal responsibility. She even worked as a pharmacy tech at CVS until they moved her to a non-pharmacy position. How does that make sense that the person who actually mixes the lethal dose doesn't get punished in the least?

Granted it sounds like this guy wasn't exactly a good pharmacist, apparently after he left the hospital he made 15 more mistakes at 3 different locations before getting fired from his new company. He subsequently lost his license because of this incident and the later mistakes. Hearing about the later mistakes actually makes me feel less sorry for the guy. Honestly, if you were a pharmacist would you let the pharm techs mix lethal drugs like chemo?

Wow, I can't believe that even happens!
 
Techs always do the mixing in the hospital setting, and the only evidence the pharmacist can look at after the mixing is the left-over vials and bags which should match up in quantity to the order. Pharmacists are the bosses of the pharmacy. Physicians are the bosses of the clinics and wards. We have to learn to work with our colleagues and develop some rapport and trust for everything to run like a well-oiled machine. If you lay at home all night worrying about what the nurses are doing to your patients at the hospital, it will make your life a bit miserable. Physicians need to learn that everybody who is not a physician is not a fool. Having said that, I do feel more comfortable with PA training than NP training because the PA training is closer to the med school experience from what I've seen and heard. So, it's a trade-off. Having good help around and working as a team can make your life a lot easier as a physician. Trust me, you will still have plenty on your plate to worry about even with the help.
 
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