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What is private practice Anesthesiology

drboris

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Jun 26, 2003
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Chicago
    I am a first year and somewhat interested in Anestheiology. I have already scheduled a shadowing for next week, however I have a question about post residency life.

    What is private practice in Anesthesiology if alll anesthesiologists work for a hospital or mini surgi center? Aren't all these docs employees of a hospital or other group? Private practice is more working for one's self, not for a hospital.

    Am I missing other opportunities for Anesthesiologists?

    Thanks
     

    UTSouthwestern

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    Jul 5, 2003
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      drboris said:
      I am a first year and somewhat interested in Anestheiology. I have already scheduled a shadowing for next week, however I have a question about post residency life.

      What is private practice in Anesthesiology if alll anesthesiologists work for a hospital or mini surgi center? Aren't all these docs employees of a hospital or other group? Private practice is more working for one's self, not for a hospital.

      Am I missing other opportunities for Anesthesiologists?

      Thanks

      There are many models to follow in private practice anesthesiology. Some work for a specific hospital and are salaried. Some work independently and are scheduled by surgeons or other subspecialists to provide anesthesia at a variety of locations. Many are associated with other anesthesiologists in groups that share financial management, contractual authority, and call scheduling. They may cover specific surgeons/subspecialists. They may cover specific facilities and all of the surgeons/subspecialists therein. Yet others are short contract physicians that provide anesthesia when contacted by locum tenems agencies. Finally, some practitioners work mutually exclusively with a specific surgeon and provides anesthesia for all of that surgeon's cases.

      Pain practitioners usually operate their own clinics with or without hospital priveleges to perform their special procedures.

      Which model you follow is totally up to you. If you want more financial independence, it is certainly available to you to do that with the understanding that you will likely have to go through a development period as you recruit more surgeons to use your practice. You may have to take the all or the majority of calls and there are rarely post call days off in private practice when you are independent or have only a single partner or two.

      Group practice comes with the advantages of established practice in place already, less frequent call, backup when you need it, and perhaps a higher profile that can be used advantageously in recruiting more business. The drawbacks are buy in period/time to partnership (which is not a guarantee), less reimbursement on a per point or per case basis, and not being able to pick and choose who you provide coverage to.

      There are many more aspects to discuss in the models of anesthesiology business, but I will leave that for others to discuss.
       

      2ndyear

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      Jul 11, 2002
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      New England
      1. Attending Physician
        DrBoris,
        I think you're getting confused around the 'private' practice term. Private in the anesthesia group model is more meant to mean 'not academic'. Generally, this means you are not employed by a university medical center. It also tends to imply that you don't have residents though it's not always the case.

        Example, around here (midwest), one group has a contract with three of the hospitals in town. It's big, 50 plus docs, 20 something CRNA's. They are contracted to provide coverage to all anesthetizing locations in the hospitals. They don't work 'for' the hospital at all. They work for Anesthesia Care, or whatever, P.C.

        It gets more confusing at a place like the University of Connecticut, for example. Obviously an academic type place, but they do have a private practice group. Part of their job is to oversee residents.
         
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        powermd

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        Mar 30, 2003
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          coconut lime said:
          what are pros and cons to private practice vs working for an academic center?
          More money (a lot more) vs less money. Emphasizing efficiency to rapidly turn over rooms vs taking your time and teaching residents. Options for a no-call schedule vs a schedule that includes regular call. Emphasis on bread and butter cases vs more exotic surgeries that may require more varied anesthetic techniques. No research vs opportunity to have a lab and generate work that advances the field. Live anywhere you want vs near a major academic medical center.

          I'm sure the CA-3s around here will have more to contribute to this discussion.
           
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