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What is the purpose of succinylcholine in rapid sequence intubation

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A

arossm

Please provide your source. I cannot find a single source on the internet that clearly states the purpose of paralysis (or even sedation for that matter) in RSI. Source required, please.
 
A

arossm

Wikipedia, and UptoDate to a less clear degree, explain it. Emergency intubation where the patient wasn't fasting. You want to paralyze the skeletal muscles to diminish gag reflex, etc to minimize aspiration. It could also be used in people with high risk for aspiration for other reasons

Well that is just extraordinary. No reliable source that addresses the role of paralytics and sedatives except vaguely stating "facilitates intubation". That has to be feat. How is this possible? At this point I'm less concerned with finding the actual reason for the medications. I am more interested in how something like this is not addressed. The crazy thing is, it's not even like I am asking a question about a rare practice. RSI so freakin common. Me thinks everyone is just copying and pasting the same phrase without caring to understand - like robots.
 
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Ismet

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Well that is just extraordinary. No reliable source that addresses the role of paralytics and sedatives except vaguely stating "facilitates intubation". That has to be feat. How is this possible? At this point I'm less concerned with finding the actual reason for the medications. I am more interested in how something like this is not addressed. The crazy thing is, it's not even like I am asking a question about a rare practice. RSI so freakin common. Me thinks everyone is just copying and pasting the same phrase without caring to understand - like robots.

Please be civil and professional here. That user gave you a correct explanation and you respond with unnecessary passive aggressiveness.

The people who use succinylcholine in RSI understand the mechanism and the purpose for using it, they're not robots. It eliminates the gag reflex and does just that, facilitates intubation. Good luck shoving a laryngoscope and ETT in someone's throat when they have full use of their skeletal muscles. You reduce the risk of aspiration of stomach contents when the person doesn't have the ability to gag and vomit. You sedate them because it can be a traumatic experience to be intubated and sedation makes the patient unconscious and amnestic, rather than awake and aware as someone is again trying to shove things down their throat.

What exactly are you looking for? A textbook that tells you the above? Find any anesthesiology textbook.

https://www.ebmedicine.net/topics.php?paction=showTopicSeg&topic_id=103&seg_id=1983
 
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