Dec 3, 2013
6
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi,

I am wondering what my chances are for MD school, especially what my chances are for mid-tier to high-tier schools. I'm gonna post a lot of info, so bear with me...

My GPA is a 3.54 with a SGPA of around 3.20. My first semester of college was absolutely dismal and I was asked to leave the school. But I had a medical problem, and the school offered to wipe out my entire first semester after they say my grades afterwards. Thankfully, my first semester doesn't count but on a transcript all the classes are listed with a big fat W next to them. After that semester, I was able to do what I have always wanted to do: Triple major in Bio/Econ/Phil (yes i know its unnecessary, don't judge). My bio degree is B.S. not B.A. and has a concentration in Cell and Molecular Genetics.

Because of that concentration, I was awarded a two summer grant from a top research school to conduct research. I already had 1.5 years of research experience before this.

I have also worked as a Emergency Room Scribe for 2 years and I know I can get a fantastic LOR from any of the docs there. I also think that this counts as shadowing even though I get paid.

I took the MCAT once and got a 35.

My EC only include being in a biology honors club, however.

So my question is, what type of schools should I apply too? Am I destined for a good MD school or will I have to try for a good DO program?

Thanks again!
 
OP
L
Dec 3, 2013
6
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Oh and I should mention, the research allows be to be a primary author of a publication.
 

mcloaf

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Are those GPA's you listed with or without the grades that are listed as withdrawals?
 
OP
L
Dec 3, 2013
6
0
Status
Pre-Medical
When the school withdrew them, they were erased from the GPA calculation. Its as if I didn't take them except for the W's on the transcript.
 

PreMedOrDead

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What should I expect?
Lots of sadness.

Joking aside:

I am wondering what my chances are for MD school, especially what my chances are for mid-tier to high-tier schools.
Honestly, not good, unless you are URM. That GPA is going to tank you otherwise.

My GPA is a 3.54 with a SGPA of around 3.20. My first semester of college was absolutely dismal and I was asked to leave the school. But I had a medical problem, and the school offered to wipe out my entire first semester after they say my grades afterwards. Thankfully, my first semester doesn't count but on a transcript all the classes are listed with a big fat W next to them.
Personal, but what was the ailment? If you do happen to get an interview and the interviewer has your coursework, they're going to ask you about it (and if they don't, don't bring it up).

After that semester, I was able to do what I have always wanted to do: Triple major in Bio/Econ/Phil (yes i know its unnecessary, don't judge). My bio degree is B.S. not B.A. and has a concentration in Cell and Molecular Genetics.
I graduated with a triple major, so this is all anecdotal, but keep that in mind. A triple major sounds pretty excessive, and in all honesty, is probably going to be frowned upon more than smiled upon in the eyes of an AdCom (and your peers, from personal experience). More apparent is that your GPA is abysmal and probably going to prompt a committee to ask why you would struggle to get three majors instead of excelling in one. If you did receive a 35, there's no reason you shouldn't have done very well in your coursework other than the likes of poor time management, laziness, and apathy... not great physician qualities. Of course, YMMV.

Because of that concentration, I was awarded a two summer grant from a top research school to conduct research. I already had 1.5 years of research experience before this.
Great and all, but this alone won't get you into an institution. It would definitely be nice if the school you did research at also had a medical program, but it doesn't guarantee much, if anything at all.

I have also worked as a Emergency Room Scribe for 2 years and I know I can get a fantastic LOR from any of the docs there. I also think that this counts as shadowing even though I get paid.
Scribe work is great, I would definitely recommend getting a LoR from the best letter writer out of those docs (not necessarily the most specialized or paid doc, but the one that knows you the best and is invested in you).

My EC only include being in a biology honors club, however.
So, this is what I have for you:

☐ Academics
☑ MCAT
☑ Recommendations
☑ Medically related experience
☐ Non-medically related experience
☐ Extracurricular activities
☑ Research
☐ Honors and awards
☐ Leadership

I checked off objective things that I think you have that are average or above average for a matriculate. There's quite a few holes I'm seeing here, not limited to your academic record. That's going to be an issue with medical programs, whether MD or DO. Not saying that it's not worth applying, but it makes your application a lot less appealing. There are also subjective things, such as the primary, secondary, and interview, which also have a large bearing on your application. But the 'check boxes' should be mostly full, not mostly empty, especially with a below-average academic record.

How does your GPA fair with grade replacement? DO does accept grade replacement, and I think you could definitely be a fine candidate for good DO programs and low-tier MD programs. That high MCAT will be your baby to sneak interviews, but the disparity is a bit of a red flag.
 
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OP
L
Dec 3, 2013
6
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Pre-Medical
PreMedOrDead:

Thanks for the reply. Your response definitely help. I'll just have to boost my GPA a little higher the next few semesters and do some more EC stuff and mostly cross my fingers. Does Indian-Asian count as URM?
 

PreMedOrDead

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PreMedOrDead:

Thanks for the reply. Your response definitely help. I'll just have to boost my GPA a little higher the next few semesters and do some more EC stuff and mostly cross my fingers. Does Indian-Asian count as URM?
I'm critical, and I know that. But that's the purpose of this forum, and I don't want to baby you into a false sense of security. You got a 35 on your MCAT, you're a very smart individual. There's no reason for you to not be crushing academically. Maintain that mindset and use your next few semesters to get your GPA into a more respectable position. If you can get your cGPA in the 3.6 range I think you would be fine. That sGPA would still bother me.

ECs also need to be long-term or at least in some way personally significant. They can't be 'just things I did.' More important than the activity itself is why you did it and what you learned from it.

Does Indian-Asian count as URM?
I'm assuming you're referring to India, the country, not Native American-Asian (dual ethnicity). In that case, no. If anything, overrepresented.

Native American, on the other hand, would have a significant bearing on your application. This is because Native American docs are significantly underrepresented in medicine, and Native American reservations are one of the most underserved regions in the country. But I'm pretty sure that's not what you're saying.
 
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MedWonk

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May 13, 2010
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Hi,

I am wondering what my chances are for MD school, especially what my chances are for mid-tier to high-tier schools. I'm gonna post a lot of info, so bear with me...

My GPA is a 3.54 with a SGPA of around 3.20. My first semester of college was absolutely dismal and I was asked to leave the school. But I had a medical problem, and the school offered to wipe out my entire first semester after they say my grades afterwards. Thankfully, my first semester doesn't count but on a transcript all the classes are listed with a big fat W next to them. After that semester, I was able to do what I have always wanted to do: Triple major in Bio/Econ/Phil (yes i know its unnecessary, don't judge). My bio degree is B.S. not B.A. and has a concentration in Cell and Molecular Genetics.

Because of that concentration, I was awarded a two summer grant from a top research school to conduct research. I already had 1.5 years of research experience before this.

I have also worked as a Emergency Room Scribe for 2 years and I know I can get a fantastic LOR from any of the docs there. I also think that this counts as shadowing even though I get paid.

I took the MCAT once and got a 35.

My EC only include being in a biology honors club, however.

So my question is, what type of schools should I apply too? Am I destined for a good MD school or will I have to try for a good DO program?

Thanks again!
That science GPA will kill your chances at MD. You need to bring it up to a 3.5+. You'll want some non-medical ECs. Go volunteer at soup kitchen/homeless shelter, do alternative spring break, a TA or become a world-class jazz guitarist.
 

PreMedOrDead

I'm sure you'll get in...
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That science GPA will kill your chances at MD. You need to bring it up to a 3.5+. You'll want some non-medical ECs. Go volunteer at soup kitchen/homeless shelter, do alternative spring break, a TA or become a world-class jazz guitarist.
Not necessarily, but he should certainly bring it up as high as possible, expand significantly in the ECs category, and possibly do an SMP/post-bacc while continuing to expand on those ECs. SMP/post-bacc would be contingent on how high he can get those GPAs before graduation. His cGPA is just above the line of competitive/non-competitive already.
 

MedWonk

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Not necessarily, but he should certainly bring it up as high as possible, expand significantly in the ECs category, and possibly do an SMP/post-bacc while continuing to expand on those ECs. SMP/post-bacc would be contingent on how high he can get those GPAs before graduation. His cGPA is just above the line of competitive/non-competitive already.
Agree, but how will adcoms view having taken a full science courseload with only a 3.2? I wouldn't necessarily say it's a "red flag", but they have other similar applicants who performed better in their science courses. Even with the solid MCAT he's going to be asked about his subpar performance in his science coursework.
 

PreMedOrDead

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Agree, but how will adcoms view having taken a full science courseload with only a 3.2? I wouldn't necessarily say it's a "red flag", but they have other similar applicants who performed better in their science courses. Even with the solid MCAT he's going to be asked about his subpar performance in his science coursework.
Bringing up that sGPA a bit and applying smartly will put him in a position at which his MCAT will allow him to be competitive. From there, it comes down to whether he can perform at interviews. Isn't that basically what everyone goes through?

And it's rather easy to talk through a question like why your GPA was low.
 
OP
L
Dec 3, 2013
6
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Perhaps I should clarify some more. My fall semester freshmen year doesn't "count." My spring semester only had one science class which is where I got a B-. Then I took four classes during the summer and I got 2 A's in four credit chemistries. I took the MCAT earlier in August and that is the 35. Theoretically, I have a LOT more science classes to take that will boost me up. I just have a lot of credits because of the amount of classes I take.

Provided my SGPA increases tremendously, and if I can get a CGPA of around 3.61~3.63, and I do a lot of EC stuff, am I more competitive to schools like Mich, Pitt, or Boston?

I'm critical, and I know that. But that's the purpose of this forum, and I don't want to baby you into a false sense of security.
I appreciate you being critical. I need to know what I'm up against and what I need to do, so thanks.

Do medical schools see scribe hours as shadowing hours?
 
OP
L
Dec 3, 2013
6
0
Status
Pre-Medical
One last thing, I live in Delaware which has no state med schools. So what are some schools that are a little more friendly with out-of-state applicants.
 

PreMedOrDead

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Perhaps I should clarify some more. My fall semester freshmen year doesn't "count." My spring semester only had one science class which is where I got a B-. Then I took four classes during the summer and I got 2 A's in four credit chemistries. I took the MCAT earlier in August and that is the 35. Theoretically, I have a LOT more science classes to take that will boost me up. I just have a lot of credits because of the amount of classes I take.


Provided my SGPA increases tremendously, and if I can get a CGPA of around 3.61~3.63, and I do a lot of EC stuff, am I more competitive to schools like Mich, Pitt, or Boston?
Number crunch and figure out what GPAs you would have at the end of your Junior year assuming you got a 4.0. That's the maximum GPA you can get. Tell us what it is.

Are you more competitive? Yes. Mich and Pitt? A 3.6 is probably pushing it, though it probably wouldn't screen you out. I think you'd have a good shot at BU.

Do medical schools see scribe hours as shadowing hours?
Most admissions will know that scribe work integrates shadowing. However, it wouldn't be a bad idea to mention that very briefly in your primary application under the activity description. It would still be a good idea to shadow a doc for a period of time. Overall, scribe work is considered excellent for learning the field of medicine.

One last thing, I live in Delaware which has no state med schools. So what are some schools that are a little more friendly with out-of-state applicants.
I Google'd "Applying to Medical School from Delaware" and came up with this:

Delaware has no state medical school. What do I do?
Delaware residents are at a disadvantage here. They have no state medical school. However, 20 places are reserved at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia for Delaware residents. All Delaware residents should seriously consider applying to Jefferson. They will be sent an additional form with the secondary application on which they will check off that they are interested in the Delaware Institute for Medical Education and Research (DIMER) program. They will fill out a very short form with biographical information that is signed by their parents (or themselves, if they are independent), stating that they have paid Delaware income taxes in the previous year. This will allow them to be considered for one of the slots set aside for Delaware residents.

The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine has recently become a member of the DIMER program also. They currently hold five seats for Delaware residents.

In addition to medical schools within your state, you should also look at schools in your region. Private schools in the state of Pennsylvania often show some special consideration for Delaware and New Jersey residents, for example. You may even be able to get an acceptance at one of the state schools in your region if you are a very competitive applicant. All students should begin their selection process in this way. Then things become more individualized.
Source

Jefferson is an excellent program. I'd recommend applying to all PA schools, from the looks of it.