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Please!

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Can medical schools change their minds after accepting you?

If I weren't to go to the second look weekend without giving notice, would they let me go?

Is it completely necessary to be 'nice' in withdrawl letters? Is it OK to be direct, and to the point?

How long must this nice-little-miss-Please! charade go on!!!!!!
 

drlexygoat

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To be completely honest, how hard is it to be courteous and polite to someone? It doesn't take THAT much effort on your part to say a few thank-you's and format your letters so you don't offend anyone.

At this point, I wouldn't try to step on anyone's toes. Mind your P's and Q's because you never know who you'll come across later on in life. That person you decide to "bl;ow off" just may be your boss some day...

anyway, best of luck! It's almost over!!!
 

G_Eagle

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What is wrong with being polite? Does one do this simply because society expects it, or does it represent character? No, I am not trying to attack you, but I am also curious when people seem to behave in a polite manner to jump through hoops. Professional courtesy is good to learn now as we are entering into the long years of training just before we embark on our careers. Therefore, I think there is no reason to cease writing polite withdrawals or following through with medical schools with the same attitude as when the process began.

Yes, I know someone is going to flame me for this for sounding accusatory, but I am really using this as a jumping platform to answer anyone who asks about the need to write a thank you note or to be gregarious with others. My opinion is that this should be a consistent factor in your daily life, not solely when it is expected of you. You might find that a little respect can go a long way...even if you don't think you'll ever see that person again.
 
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CalBeE

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In my withdrawal letters, I actually mention a few things I like about the school, but "after much consideration, I've decided to withdraw my acceptance from your medical school". YOu can do everything in one short paragraph, it's not that hard, really.
 

Please!

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I think some folks might be taking me more seriously than I expected.

What prompted me to write this thread is that I spent about and hour writing an email to a school explaining why I couldn't attend the 2nd look day they offered me and preferred attending the another day. I read this email over and over to make sure that it sounded polite. It was a bit frustrating. I've done the same thing with my withdrawl letters. Not because I thought that it would affect me in some negative way if I didn't, just because I thought it was the right thing to do.

I was just thinking that these admissions people probably don't want to read past the first line anyway, so why not skip all the nicities and get to the nitty gritty.

I can't remember "blowing off" anyone before in life. I think it might be just a personal thing, but there is a point where I feel as if I am TOO concerned with being nice and polite. It gets to a point where it really does keep me up at night. I think I may do it to the point of excess, where it may be a detriment rather than a virtue.

.....I don't know I'm just thinking out loud.
 

Gleevec

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Originally posted by Please!
I think some folks might be taking me more seriously than I expected.

What prompted me to write this thread is that I spent about and hour writing an email to a school explaining why I couldn't attend the 2nd look day they offered me and preferred attending the another day. I read this email over and over to make sure that it sounded polite. It was a bit frustrating. I've done the same thing with my withdrawl letters. Not because I thought that it would affect me in some negative way if I didn't, just because I thought it was the right thing to do.

I was just thinking that these admissions people probably don't want to read past the first line anyway, so why not skip all the nicities and get to the nitty gritty.

I can't remember "blowing off" anyone before in life. I think it might be just a personal thing, but there is a point where I feel as if I am TOO concerned with being nice and polite. It gets to a point where it really does keep me up at night. I think I may do it to the point of excess, where it may be a detriment rather than a virtue.

.....I don't know I'm just thinking out loud.

An hour trying to explain why youre not going to second look weekend? Dont worry about it. You dont need to make it flowery, just not rude. Go with the flow.
 

G_Eagle

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When you put it like that, I think you have a legitimate gripe. My response is this. I am glad that you try your best to sound respectful to schools, but spending an hour on a letter is too long. There is nothing wrong with creating a formula for withdrawal letters, and changing small details to make it apply to the school to which you are writing. Also, any letter you send should only be a few lines long (such as two or three) because you are correct in assuming that they will not read all of a long note. So relax a little about it, make a template letter to work with, and keep them short.

You are doing the right thing. You can never be too polite, and the fact that you are respectfully corresponding with the schools is a sign of good character. If you would like a sample withdrawal letter, PM me, and I will send you one of mine.
 

supereagles

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Originally posted by G_Eagle
When you put it like that, I think you have a legitimate gripe. My response is this. I am glad that you try your best to sound respectful to schools, but spending an hour on a letter is too long. There is nothing wrong with creating a formula for withdrawal letters, and changing small details to make it apply to the school to which you are writing. Also, any letter you send should only be a few lines long (such as two or three) because you are correct in assuming that they will not read all of a long note. So relax a little about it, make a template letter to work with, and keep them short.

You are doing the right thing. You can never be too polite, and the fact that you are respectfully corresponding with the schools is a sign of good character. If you would like a sample withdrawal letter, PM me, and I will send you one of mine.

True that! Sometimes "please" (interesting combination) I feel exactly the same way you do.
 

Zweihander

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A good withdrawal letter will thank the school for their offer and tell them that you will attend another school that you find a "better fit," or some such. You don't need to tell them your life story, but as long as you don't say "haha screw you crapholes!!!" you're doing fine.

You're right, they're not gonna agonize over a friggin' withdrawal letter, but it's always nice to be appreciative, as you're doing.

Rock on, and congrats on your acceptances!
:horns: :horns:
 
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