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InternationlDoc

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After getting smacked on NBME on Behavioral science I was wonderign if anybody knows of a good source of questions for BS. I've already done all questions on BS in Qbook, Appleton and Lange, and Qbank (did well on all of them) - yep didn't suffice for NBME or may be i'm just stupid.This is my weakest subject. Any help is appreciated.
 

polyposis

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Which part of behavioral science are you struggling with? The ethics questions, biostats, or psych? It might be more helpful to pick up another review book instead (like HY behavioral science) to brush up on the area.
 

osli

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Bumping this because it remains one of my weaknesses as well. I've gone through the FA section, and have gone through a Kaplan review on behavioral science, and still just score "average" here.

I know that some questions I miss I think are more pharm than behavioral (well, at least according to Kaplan they are behavioral), such as antipsychotic drug side effects, mechanisms, etc. I haven't really hit pharm hard yet so that doesn't bother me. With the NBME (only taken form 1 so far) I don't know what questions were included in behavioral and which in pharm or other areas, so I only know that my behavioral bar was borderline/average/whatever you consider the center of the graph to be.

But I do keep missing questions on "what should you do/say" situations. Any advice? I know the WWJD strategy, but the ones I miss usually come down to two answers that I can justify almost equally well. So I miss about half of those (maybe 1 out of ever 4 or 5 situational questions, which is too much when these should be gimmies). The question is usually a choice between a blunt/direct approach or a tangential/ease-into-it approach. Do you say "I see something is bothering you, do you mind talking about that" or "what brings you in today." I can see both being appropriate given a particular patient, which I never feel is detailed well enough to know which is a better course.

I haven't picked up any HY/roadmap etc. yet for behavioral/psychiatry, so maybe that will help more. I'm looking for a pretty succint list of "rules" that you should always follow to reach the correct answer for board purposes. I don't care if I agree or not, I just want to know how to get to the right answer. My people skills are fine, I have no concerns there... I just don't want to lose points on a written exam due to "not knowing the 'rules' of the game."
 

sade

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I'm looking for a pretty succint list of "rules" that you should always follow to reach the correct answer for board purposes. I don't care if I agree or not, I just want to know how to get to the right answer. My people skills are fine, I have no concerns there... I just don't want to lose points on a written exam due to "not knowing the 'rules' of the game."

I still havent faced the beast but if your looking for a book with a set of rules or strategy to approach medical ethics its, Conrad Fischers book on Medical Ethics 100 cases youll must likely see in the USMLE's.
Concise straight to the point.

Ive been using HY Behav and Fischers book.
Best of luck.
 
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DragonWell

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I don't know if it's in the old edition as well, but I picked up the 3rd edition of HY behavioral and it has a section specifically about the "quote" questions - ie. what should the doctor say to the patient. I don't know if it'd be helpful to you. I often still come down to two choices that sound pretty good, too, and at that point I tend to go for the one which seems more neutral and open ended with pretty good results.
 

InternationlDoc

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oh wow

haven't checked the thread in a while, but I went ahead and ordered that ethics book online a week ago and somebody recommended it here :D

For me the problem was the shelf exam. I am doing UWorld and did Kapaln and am consistently ~80% on Behavioral Science. Not the case on shelf. I think it had more to do with lack of preparation couple of days before it and time mismanagement = avg. score

oh well. Lesson learnt. No subject is "easy". BUST A$$ for all.
 

hasha100

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what about the behavioral science BRS by Fadem? I think it has some good questions. But I don't remember there being many "quote questions" in there. Most of the "quote" questions are in the review test for chapter 21 in the 4th edition. That's the chapter dealing with ethics.
 

n3ur05ur930n

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But I do keep missing questions on "what should you do/say" situations. Any advice? I know the WWJD strategy, but the ones I miss usually come down to two answers that I can justify almost equally well. So I miss about half of those (maybe 1 out of ever 4 or 5 situational questions, which is too much when these should be gimmies). The question is usually a choice between a blunt/direct approach or a tangential/ease-into-it approach. Do you say "I see something is bothering you, do you mind talking about that" or "what brings you in today." I can see both being appropriate given a particular patient, which I never feel is detailed well enough to know which is a better course.

Use your common sense. Would you really want your doctor to say to you "I see something is bothering you..." That is not so far from saying, "Man you look like crap today you sure you don't have cancer..."
It is ALWAYS better to be open-ended and never say anything judgemental to the patient. If nothing is bother him/her, then you have just offended your patient.
 

n3ur05ur930n

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I still havent faced the beast but if your looking for a book with a set of rules or strategy to approach medical ethics its, Conrad Fischers book on Medical Ethics 100 cases youll must likely see in the USMLE's.
Concise straight to the point.

Ive been using HY Behav and Fischers book.
Best of luck.

The issues you seem to be addressing were taught in my first year course on "Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues in Medicine". For that course, we used Bernard Lo's "Resolving Ethical Dilemmas." I highly recommend it for this topic as well as general reference for ethics issues throughout medical school and your future career.
 
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