Jul 25, 2009
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Has anyone thought of getting their education in the united states then moving to another country?

I was born in jamaica.
I know doctors who live in elite areas with huge houses, great family life, relaxed and just really chill and have time off to do fun stuff.
One in particular works a 7-5.

I grew up in England.
I read an article today saying that general practice doctors are making way more than the united states even if they get education here and move there.
i dont remember exactly, but say someone in the U.S was making 150,000 a year, a doctor that got their education in the U.S, then moved to england is making 300,000.

I'm not just saying for the money, but that article was really interesting.

Or maybe even school abroad?
What's that like?
Is it decreasing chances of getting into a residency programs in the U.S?
 

DrYoda

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Jun 22, 2008
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Has anyone thought of getting their education in the united states then moving to another country?

I grew up in England.
I read an article today saying that general practice doctors are making way more than the united states even if they get education here and move there.
i dont remember exactly, but say someone in the U.S was making 150,000 a year, a doctor that got their education in the U.S, then moved to england is making 300,000.
In general doctors make more in the US than in European countries. Medical education in the US is very expensive, so if you plan on practicing elsewhere it would probably be financially better to get your medical degree in that country where it is probably cheaper.


Or maybe even school abroad?
What's that like?
Is it decreasing chances of getting into a residency programs in the U.S?
I can't say much on residency chances since I'm only about to start med school and don't know much residency applications. I would imagine it depends on what country and school you go to. I know there are some medical schools set up for americans in eastern europe that I hear are looked down on for residencies.

I briefly considered getting a medical degree in Europe, but decided against it for the below reason and a personal reason.

-My family is here in the US and I want to live and work in the US. A US medical degree provides the easiest route to working as a physician in the US.
 

GoodmanBrown

is walking down the path.
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In general doctors make more in the US than in European countries. Medical education in the US is very expensive, so if you plan on practicing elsewhere it would probably be financially better to get your medical degree in that country where it is probably cheaper.



I can't say much on residency chances since I'm only about to start med school and don't know much residency applications. I would imagine it depends on what country and school you go to. I know there are some medical schools set up for americans in eastern europe that I hear are looked down on for residencies.

I briefly considered getting a medical degree in Europe, but decided against it for the below reason and a personal reason.

-My family is here in the US and I want to live and work in the US. A US medical degree provides the easiest route to working as a physician in the US.
I agree with Yoda. It entirely depends on what school you go to. If you go to a Caribbean school or one of those Eastern European schools, you'll have a tougher time getting a US residency. If you go to a well regarded British, French, Scandinavian, etc. school, I think it will be potentially just as easy as a US school. This is basically what an attending at a well-regarded US med school told me.