md-2020

The Immaculate Catch
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Jun 29, 2015
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The first 2 should both be fine.

#3 probably not only b/c you're in an administrative role, away from direct patient contact.
 

beeboops

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Does it pass the "smell test"? If you can smell the patient, then it's clinical, I would say :p
 
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Catalystik

The Gimlet Eye
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Sep 4, 2006
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I'm currently taking a gap year and hope to fix some deficits on my application, one of which is low clinical volunteering (I do have tons of shadowing, but not much clinical, hands-on exposure). Which of these opportunities would count and help fill this deficit?

1. Volunteer at an elderly home - I was previously a hospice volunteer, but the only hospice center "nearby" is ~2hrs. away! I can't afford to keep going there all the time…too far. Hence, I was wondering if volunteering at an elderly home can be equated to the kind of clinical exposure we get from hospice.

2. Volunteer at an Alzheimer's association - this involves working w/ Alzheimer's patients, playing games with them, encouraging them, making meals and overall just offering support for these patients.

3. Volunteer at a free clinic - administrative role of course; still trying to get this position

…And I can't think of any more; all the others (scribe, EMT, CNA) require a lot of training first :/
There is a big difference in perception of the adequacy of available "clinical experience" between a retirement home/independent or assisted senior center and a skilled-level nursing home. The latter is most likely to give you the kind of exposure that would be of value to your application.

Same goes for Alzheimer's Daycare and an In-Patient Program. Aim for the latter.

What would your "Administrative" role be at a free clinic? If you'd be filing papers and working in a back room without patient contact, it won't help fulfill adcomm expectations for clinical experience (even though the work is performed in a clinic setting).
 
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LizzyM

the evil queen of numbers
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Whatever you do, you want to be face-to-face with people who are receiving clinical services. Are the people you interact with called "pateints"? Do they have a doctor's order for whatever you are doing (in some settings, even giving people a snack requires a diet order from a physician or other provider)? Is there a doctor or other provider on the premises?

In terms of hospice, are their home hospice services provided in your area? You might check with a local hospital's palliative care service to see if hospice services are provided in patients' homes. Another possible location for hospice care is within nursing homes so you might call and see things are done that way in your immediate area. And some hospitals have a hospice unit so that might be a possibility.
 
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Goro

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I have a higher regard for #1 and #2, as these types of patients are up front reminders of our mortality and not everyone is comfortable in dealing with this. As #1 is more difficult in terms of travel, then #2 is fine. And #3 is fine as well!

I'm currently taking a gap year and hope to fix some deficits on my application, one of which is low clinical volunteering (I do have tons of shadowing, but not much clinical, hands-on exposure). Which of these opportunities would count and help fill this deficit?

1. Volunteer at an elderly home - I was previously a hospice volunteer, but the only hospice center "nearby" is ~2hrs. away! I can't afford to keep going there every week, esp during busy semesters…too far. Hence, I was wondering if volunteering at an elderly home can be equated to the kind of clinical exposure we get from hospice.

2. Volunteer at an Alzheimer's association - this involves working w/ Alzheimer's patients, playing games with them, encouraging them, making meals and overall just offering support for these patients.

3. Volunteer at a free clinic - administrative role of course; still trying to get this position

…And I can't think of any more; all the others (scribe, EMT, CNA) require a lot of training first :/
 

mehc012

Big Damn Hero
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Jul 9, 2012
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Also, though I have nothing against the options you presented, I do want to clarify something in your final point...Scribing does not require you to have any training or experience beforehand.
 
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