jhonny depp

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Why are residents called as residents.??
One patient thought I lived in the hospital 24-7 and wanted to know where was I when her son was vomiting at 2 AM in the morning. I politely explained I was not a resident just on call.
I have been a resident for 6-7 years now starting from internship- general surgery - Cardiac surgery and finally I hope for the last time GI Surgery
Regarding teaching of us residents (presuming it exists) why does it has to start with a question...
What is the cause of??
What are the findings ..
Why do you say this..
Is this the real teaching. Does a consultant comes and say
"I ll tell you why pain of Acute pancreatitis goes to the back."
 
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Winged Scapula

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Why are residents called as residents.??
Because residents did used to live in the hospital, or hospital housing at least. Hence the term "house officer".

One patient thought I lived in the hospital 24-7 and wanted to know where was I when her son was vomiting at 2 AM in the morning. I politely explained I was not a resident just on call.

I have been a resident fond finallr 6-7 years now starting from internship- general surgery - Cardiac surgery and finally I hope for the last time GI Surgery
Regarding teahing of us residents (presuming it exists) why does it has to start with a question...
What is the cause of??
What are the findings ..
Why do you say this..
Is this the real teaching. Does a consultant comes and say
"I ll tell you why pain of Acukte pancreatitis goes to the back."
Because people are used to being spoonfed and given the answers.
 
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It started with Dr. Halsted at hopkins who said that if you want to become a surgeon you have to be at the hospital 24/7 taking care of the patients, hence the name "resident".
 

mercaptovizadeh

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It started with Dr. Halsted at hopkins who said that if you want to become a surgeon you have to be at the hospital 24/7 taking care of the patients, hence the name "resident".
Halsted was also a cocaine AND morphine addict and basically thought doctors should not marry or have families and medicine should consume their lives 100%, so I take his views as pretty worthless.

Little surprise, then, that Hopkins is still one of the most malignant places out there, with some non-surgical residencies rivalling (in malignancy) surgical residencies at a lot of other places.
 
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jhonny depp

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Because residents did used to live in the hospital, or hospital housing at least. Hence the term "house officer".



Because people are used to being spoonfed and given the answers.
Its not about spoon feeding. We are here to train as speciality surgeons not go through multiple journals and books to find out reasons for things no body knows about.
 

Winged Scapula

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Its not about spoon feeding. We are here to train as speciality surgeons not go through multiple journals and books to find out reasons for things no body knows about.
In your oddly written query, you appeared to be asking why consultants wanted you to find the answer rather than simply tell you what it was. There is value in that as adult learners do better when they take an active role in their education.

I am well aware that many things in medicine are done without hard data. Wouldn't that be important to know? If your faculty is just giving you busy work or you just want to vent that's a different story but it still sounds like you want them to tell you the answer.
 

Danbo1957

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Little surprise, then, that Hopkins is still one of the most malignant places out there, with some non-surgical residencies rivalling (in malignancy) surgical residencies at a lot of other places.
Maybe, but Hopkins residents are trained so damn well, easy to tell the difference between them and residents from anywhere else...
 

JackADeli

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Its not about spoon feeding. We are here to train as speciality surgeons not go through multiple journals and books to find out reasons for things no body knows about.
Literature review is a component of surgical training. A significant part of training as speciality surgeons IS to go through multiple journals and books to find out reasons for things ("no body" knows about). There is vast amounts of publications... probably daily. I dare say much of it "nobody knows". It requires case specific discovery in numerous circumstances... If it is beneath you or not in your training as speciality surgeons paradigm to search out this information then it falls to someone else to find and teach you.... thus spoon feed.
 

SLUser11

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Maybe, but Hopkins residents are trained so damn well, easy to tell the difference between them and residents from anywhere else...
If you say so.


Does anybody outside of Hopkins actually believe that?
 

Danbo1957

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Does anybody outside of Hopkins actually believe that?
I do, I've hired a number of them. That which a doctor experienced at a residency in East Baltimore compared to another who did a residency in, say, Wichita, is easily indentifiable...
 
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SLUser11

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I do, I've hired a number of them. That which a doctor experienced who did a residency in East Baltimore compared to another who did one in, say, Wichita, is easily indentifiable....


But have you been to west Wichita? Pretty damn scary. :wink:
Well, there's a million ways to approach this response. First of all, what is it that makes a surgeon great? Is it bedside manner, technical skills, teaching skills, overall mental faculty, etc?

Then, a better question would be how does a person with no experience in surgery....e.g. an IM doc...measure a surgeon's greatness?

I've encountered plenty of people from both prestigious programs and average to below-average programs, and my feeling is that when a certain amount of elitism already exists among the judges, the "greatness" of certain programs is sort of self-fulfilling.

Now, if we're specifically talking about the trauma experience from an inner city program, there are plenty of knife and gun clubs more dangerous and busy than Baltimore, and they don't necessarily carry the Johns Hopkins feeling of superiority.


As for the surgical education offered in Wichita, I'm obviously biased, but I'm very confident in my personal training. When it comes to academics, ABSITE scores, board scores, operative experience, and overall environment, I definitely don't feel intimidated by bigger name programs. Of course, I don't run around saying that Wichita grads are "so damn well trained," because I don't have to.....our actions speak for themselves.

Now don't get me wrong. I'm sure that the training in Baltimore is excellent. A couple of our trauma staff trained and worked there, and share good stories. I just don't feel that the training is vastly superior.

One thing we do lack compared to Hopkins (besides that feeling of superiority) is research opportunities, but most people who choose to train here have different career goals than the average "Halsted Resident."
 

Danbo1957

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FYI:

the comment about "have you ever been to West Wichita..." was from me. I was using my phone to respond and must have pressed "edit" on Danbo's post instead of reply. I see you've edited it out but it appears in the reply by SLUser.

Apologies Danbo.:(
No problemo, I thought that I'd muffed it up in some way. Editing posts from a phone, what reach you have over us all!

West Wichita versus East Baltimore... hmmm, well, I have not been to the former, but I have been to the latter. From a post that I made on City-Data concerning bad neighborhoods in the US:

Compton, Oakland, 5th Ward in Houston, 9th Ward in New Orleans... there are others. But, Baltimore has third world, post nuclear war, zombie filled, Mad Max-like neighborhoods. You can look east from the top of the buildings at Hopkins and see the boarded up homes, gun battles, prostitues, 12-year-old drug dealers, dead-eyed wastoids, dirt bike riders, empty lots, trashed-out streets - and it's not going change; much in West Baltimore and east along Greenmount Ave. are the same.

It's just unbelievable that so many people live in that world...
http://www.city-data.com/forum/baltimore/690151-top-25-worst-neighborhoods-list-two.html#post9577878
 

SLUser11

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No problemo, I thought that I'd muffed it up in some way. Editing posts from a phone, what reach you have over us all!

West Wichita versus East Baltimore... hmmm, well, I have not been to the former, but I have been to the latter. From a post that I made on City-Data concerning bad neighborhoods in the US:



http://www.city-data.com/forum/baltimore/690151-top-25-worst-neighborhoods-list-two.html#post9577878
I feel like you're missing the point. I'm sure Baltimore is dangerous, but its hardships are certainly not exclusive. Places like Detroit, New Orleans, Atlanta, etc. all have plenty of great stories. I spent 8 years (including med school) in St. Louis, which topped the subjective "most dangerous city" list several times, and I'm well aware of what special surgical opportunities these cities offer. However, I don't hear these residencies tooting their own horn that much. I doubt that the Hopkins prestige stems from its trauma experience.


As for Wichita, while not without a certain amount of penetrating trauma, it's definitely a safe place overall, which factored positively into my decision making. WS was being facetious when mentioning the Westside. That being said, as trauma chief I lapped 2 people saturday morning for GSWs......I don't think they were from West Wichita, but who knows....
 

45408

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As for Wichita, while not without a certain amount of penetrating trauma, it's definitely a safe place overall, which factored positively into my decision making. WS was being facetious when mentioning the Westside. That being said, as trauma chief I lapped 2 people saturday morning for GSWs......I don't think they were from West Wichita, but who knows....
yeah, shouldn't your user text say PGY-4 now? it's been like 3 whole weeks.
 

SLUser11

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yeah, shouldn't your user text say PGY-4 now? it's been like 3 whole weeks.
Just fixed it. Yep, I'm big time now.......an extra $38/week....

I also changed it from Kansas University to University of Kansas....semantics that are lost on me but are apparently very important to native Kansans.
 
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jhonny depp

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Literature review is a component of surgical training. A significant part of training as speciality surgeons IS to go through multiple journals and books to find out reasons for things ("no body" knows about). There is vast amounts of publications... probably daily. I dare say much of it "nobody knows". It requires case specific discovery in numerous circumstances... If it is beneath you or not in your training as speciality surgeons paradigm to search out this information then it falls to someone else to find and teach you.... thus spoon feed.
I agree completely there.