SeattleRDH

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Have any of you weighed the pros and cons of each? Why did you choose one over the other?
 

baseballjunkie

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Have any of you weighed the pros and cons of each? Why did you choose one over the other?
The NHSC scholarship is VERY hard to get. They only give out a few (like, maybe 10). Additionally, since you're asking that question in the military thread, you're going to get people like me who are going to say "because we want to join the military"

Military dentistry can be more than just money for school. There are lots of opportunities to further your education in specializing or GPR/AEGDs. In my case doing the HSCP going to UW, I'll graduate and start in the Navy as an O3E with 4 years and my salary is going to be that of an associate dentist anyway. Therefore, I'll make the same as a civilian associate right out of school, I'll have a guaranteed job, I won't have any loans, lots of opportunity to specialize, and I will get experience practicing in different locations and to see the world....

I chose military dentistry because I want to be a military dentist. However, if you're just doing it for the money... you might not be happy.
 

ALTOSS

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The NHSC scholarship is VERY hard to get. They only give out a few (like, maybe 10). Additionally, since you're asking that question in the military thread, you're going to get people like me who are going to say "because we want to join the military"

Military dentistry can be more than just money for school. There are lots of opportunities to further your education in specializing or GPR/AEGDs. In my case doing the HSCP going to UW, I'll graduate and start in the Navy as an O3E with 4 years and my salary is going to be that of an associate dentist anyway. Therefore, I'll make the same as a civilian associate right out of school, I'll have a guaranteed job, I won't have any loans, lots of opportunity to specialize, and I will get experience practicing in different locations and to see the world....

I chose military dentistry because I want to be a military dentist. However, if you're just doing it for the money... you might not be happy.

doing HPSP or HSCP is still fine, even financially. i wasn't aware of the HRSA stuff until i joined the army, but i realized the latter is the better program. some of military benefits: b/f school: sign up bonus, nearly double the monthly stipend, annual ADT, which would triple the monthly stipend, PX/commissary privileges, and other perks such as auto insurance discount, free admissions to parks and entertainments, after school: better salary, perhaps better assignment than possibly living in an inner city for 4 years, post grad opportunities, etc.

i also heard that HRSA is really competitive: they say it was 1:11 ratio 2 years ago (of all who already gained admission), and i heard some say they only selected a handful (if any) last year. a friend of mine applied last year and was not selected, and told me the personnel was rather unfriendly and slower than the army (surprisingly).

my second thought is, nowadays, why anyone would even bother HRSA or HPSP if their only concern is money. i'd just borrow as much as i can, spend or save, graduate, and work at some govt hospital or NGO clinic for 10 years and get all of the loans forgiven, without any tax consequences. you still gain good experience without any deployment concerns, relocation, worries about inner cities, etc.
 

SeattleRDH

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This is such a hard decision. I'm applying this coming cycle to schools that are on the more expensive end. Except UW, where I would get in-state tuition. I feel confident that I will get into UW but I would really prefer UoP if I got in.

My issue is that by the time I graduate I'll be 35 and that doesn't leave me as much time to pay off my loans and save up before retirement. So, if I were to take out loans for school UW would be the logical choice. Of course I'm not going to make this decision before I have an acceptance but I've heard that one must start applying to the military scholarship by this fall.

I strongly believe in service, whether it be military or public health, and would be happy to work in either. But if I'm going to give up 4 years of my life I want it to be worth it financially.

I already have my dad's practice in Alaska that I will be taking over - for free. He said that my first year I would be looking at around $180,000 salary. He also said that if he could do it again he would have taken a full-ride scholarship - "it's only four years of your life, what would you do for half-a-million dollars?"

So I guess my question is: If you knew you would be making $180,000 your first year out of school would you still have taken the scholarship?
 

baseballjunkie

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This is such a hard decision. I'm applying this coming cycle to schools that are on the more expensive end. Except UW, where I would get in-state tuition. I feel confident that I will get into UW but I would really prefer UoP if I got in.

My issue is that by the time I graduate I'll be 35 and that doesn't leave me as much time to pay off my loans and save up before retirement. So, if I were to take out loans for school UW would be the logical choice. Of course I'm not going to make this decision before I have an acceptance but I've heard that one must start applying to the military scholarship by this fall.

I strongly believe in service, whether it be military or public health, and would be happy to work in either. But if I'm going to give up 4 years of my life I want it to be worth it financially.

I already have my dad's practice in Alaska that I will be taking over - for free. He said that my first year I would be looking at around $180,000 salary. He also said that if he could do it again he would have taken a full-ride scholarship - "it's only four years of your life, what would you do for half-a-million dollars?"

So I guess my question is: If you knew you would be making $180,000 your first year out of school would you still have taken the scholarship?

I'm a WA resident, and I'm going to UW. I would do it again in a heartbeat. I want to join the military and I want to be a dentist.

If you have a guaranteed 180k a year and you're only doing military for the money, then I'd take out the loans.

I wouldn't worry too much about age though. When I went on the MED VIP trip the Navy does to San Diego, there was a PT who was prior enlisted service, went to undergrad and PT school, then has been private practice for 5 years and now at 38 is trying to get back into the Navy to have the rest of his loans paid off and then wants the retirement check that comes with the 20 years of service.
 
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xhamburgersamx

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This is such a hard decision. I'm applying this coming cycle to schools that are on the more expensive end. Except UW, where I would get in-state tuition. I feel confident that I will get into UW but I would really prefer UoP if I got in.

My issue is that by the time I graduate I'll be 35 and that doesn't leave me as much time to pay off my loans and save up before retirement. So, if I were to take out loans for school UW would be the logical choice. Of course I'm not going to make this decision before I have an acceptance but I've heard that one must start applying to the military scholarship by this fall.

I strongly believe in service, whether it be military or public health, and would be happy to work in either. But if I'm going to give up 4 years of my life I want it to be worth it financially.

I already have my dad's practice in Alaska that I will be taking over - for free. He said that my first year I would be looking at around $180,000 salary. He also said that if he could do it again he would have taken a full-ride scholarship - "it's only four years of your life, what would you do for half-a-million dollars?"

So I guess my question is: If you knew you would be making $180,000 your first year out of school would you still have taken the scholarship?
if you know you're going to earn 180k take home first year out then it doesn't matter how much your loans are, you'll live fine. I'm just curious how you know you are going to take home that much.

OOps, didn't read your whole post. Alaska for 180K per year... I've seen associate positions offering $250k per year to relocate up there... I'd probably work in Sunny Southern california for $100k than Alaska.
 

SeattleRDH

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if you know you're going to earn 180k take home first year out then it doesn't matter how much your loans are, you'll live fine. I'm just curious how you know you are going to take home that much.

OOps, didn't read your whole post. Alaska for 180K per year... I've seen associate positions offering $250k per year to relocate up there... I'd probably work in Sunny Southern california for $100k than Alaska.
Of course you would. You probably haven't been there. I was born and raised in AK and I'm taking over my dad's practice. $250,000? Maybe. But I won't be an associate. I'll be the owner and my practice will take medicaid.
 

xhamburgersamx

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Of course you would. You probably haven't been there. I was born and raised in AK and I'm taking over my dad's practice. $250,000? Maybe. But I won't be an associate. I'll be the owner and my practice will take medicaid.
If you're going to have no business loan and just student loans then why are you even considering the financial aspect of the military. Obviously you are better off owning your dad's practice straight out of school....

You have to be joining to be a part of the military and experience life that way. The only issue I'd have between doing hpsp or taking loans is if I attended the top 3 more expensive schools.