why...?

Discussion in 'Step I' started by goodies, May 6, 2007.

  1. goodies

    goodies Member
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    i have a couple of questions... can anyone explain please?

    why does hypercalcemia lead to peptic ulcers?

    does apoptosis, necrosis, and/or atrophy occur with menses?
     
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  3. AmoryBlaine

    AmoryBlaine the last tycoon
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    God's will.
     
  4. SkylineMD

    SkylineMD Senior Member
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    from what Goljan has to say, the uterus undergoes both hypertrophy and hyperplasia so makes sense if during menses that both apoptosis and atrophy are occurring. Though on a test if given the choice between the two, i would go with atrophy as that's usually the classification its placed under.
     
  5. JayneCobb

    JayneCobb big damn hero....
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    [SIZE=-1]prolonged hypercalcemia tends to cause high gastrin levels which increases acid secretion.
    [/SIZE]
     
  6. goodies

    goodies Member
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    for some reason, kaplan says that necrosis occurs with menses.......
     
  7. SeventhSon

    SeventhSon SIMMER DOWN
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    why would high ca increase gastrin levels?

    the only thing I could think of was that more serum calcium means Ca entering voltage-gated Ca channels -> more Ach release -> more m3 stimulation of G-cells -> more gastrin release.

    the problem is that if i'm not mistaken, hypercalcemia also systemically suppresses neuronal activity (that's why you get neurological sx right). Anyone help?
     
  8. Doc 2b

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    [​IMG]


    I think this will help.
     
  9. SeventhSon

    SeventhSon SIMMER DOWN
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    out of curiosity, what book is that? I looked in a bunch of different books and nowhere did i see gastrin as a stimulant for calcitonin secretion or Ca as a stimulant for gastrin secretion. Are both secondary effects?
     
  10. SoCuteMD

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    Also, parathyroid adenoma and pancreatic adenoma are both components of MEN I. So you'll have hypercalcemia and possibly a hx of peptic ulcers.
     
  11. Doc 2b

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    Found it thru google. Same pic was in my notes from last year, I remember my prof saying something about how "that's why people get addicted to rolaids. they put calcium in them to keep you using them" that's the way I've always remembered it. ;) So Cute's right about the MEN sd, that will also give you an elevated gastrin even in the absence of a gastrinoma.
     

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