dexorbit

7+ Year Member
Jun 19, 2009
82
3
141
Los Angeles, California
Status
Pre-Medical
hello! how y'all doing? this question goes out to all the non-trads out there who were able to juggle work while doing their pre-reqs at the same time.

about me. Im an RN that works 36 hours per week and will be starting on my pre-reqs this coming fall '10. My question: Is it feasible working 36 hours/weekly and have a load of lets say 12-14 units per semester? Bec my pre-health advisor told me to have 12 units per sem and when I told her that Im working 36 hours weekly. She just frowned and said. well you still gotta do 12 units or more... Any thoughts on this?? appreciate it a lot.... Thanks!
 

mspeedwagon

7+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2009
2,097
450
181
Florida
Status
Medical Student
My first piece of advice... don't listen to your pre-health advisor. I don't know why there are so many pre-health advisors that just give misinformation (or SDNers that leave out vital information on their posts, but I'll give you the benefit of the doubt).

The best advice is it's not how many classes you take in one semester, but rather how you do in them. Straight As can speak for a lot (no matter how much time it took you to achieve them). That, in combination with a high MCAT and you are golden.

I was a biology major, so I was only filling in the missing gaps, but I took ONE class a semester. I travel a ton for work, work full-time and in addition to consulting work part-time (easily 60hr work weeks if not more), not counting my one class that meets 4 hrs every Monday night. Given that schedule, I could only take one class at a time.

Ask yourself what you are comfortable with. I suggest starting with one class (preferably a summer biology class so you are not getting out of sequence for the chemistry or physics classes) and then ramping up to two for fall (g-chem I and physics I). For year two, take organic chemistry and an MCAT prep course. That's your two year plan.


hello! how y'all doing? this question goes out to all the non-trads out there who were able to juggle work while doing their pre-reqs at the same time.

about me. Im an RN that works 36 hours per week and will be starting on my pre-reqs this coming fall '10. My question: Is it feasible working 36 hours/weekly and have a load of lets say 12-14 units per semester? Bec my pre-health advisor told me to have 12 units per sem and when I told her that Im working 36 hours weekly. She just frowned and said. well you still gotta do 12 units or more... Any thoughts on this?? appreciate it a lot.... Thanks!
 

DrMidlife

has an opinion
10+ Year Member
Oct 30, 2006
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Resident [Any Field]
Agree w/speedwagon. Whatever gets you A's.

Most premed advisers are not very good, particularly with nontrads. It's not like it's a high-paying job where you're measured by your results.

Before you apply, you should prove that you can handle a full science load. Add working to this, and you prove the crap out of it, but you don't necessarily get extra credit.

As an RN you've got a TON of options as you work through the prereqs, in terms of part time opportunities. Not so with most of us career changers.

Best of luck to you.
 
Feb 19, 2010
12
0
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Agree w/speedwagon. Whatever gets you A's.

Most premed advisers are not very good, particularly with nontrads. It's not like it's a high-paying job where you're measured by your results.

Before you apply, you should prove that you can handle a full science load. Add working to this, and you prove the crap out of it, but you don't necessarily get extra credit.

As an RN you've got a TON of options as you work through the prereqs, in terms of part time opportunities. Not so with most of us career changers.

Best of luck to you.
So, would you advise to take classes at a private university where classes are very tough (more difficult to get an A) as opposed to a state university where classes might not be as tough?

How will this be seen by adcoms? How much will the name matter? How much will it affect your preparation for med school?

Thanks for the info. Really appreciate it.:)
 

dexorbit

7+ Year Member
Jun 19, 2009
82
3
141
Los Angeles, California
Status
Pre-Medical
My first piece of advice... don't listen to your pre-health advisor. I don't know why there are so many pre-health advisors that just give misinformation (or SDNers that leave out vital information on their posts, but I'll give you the benefit of the doubt).

The best advice is it's not how many classes you take in one semester, but rather how you do in them. Straight As can speak for a lot (no matter how much time it took you to achieve them). That, in combination with a high MCAT and you are golden.

I was a biology major, so I was only filling in the missing gaps, but I took ONE class a semester. I travel a ton for work, work full-time and in addition to consulting work part-time (easily 60hr work weeks if not more), not counting my one class that meets 4 hrs every Monday night. Given that schedule, I could only take one class at a time.

Ask yourself what you are comfortable with. I suggest starting with one class (preferably a summer biology class so you are not getting out of sequence for the chemistry or physics classes) and then ramping up to two for fall (g-chem I and physics I). For year two, take organic chemistry and an MCAT prep course. That's your two year plan.

Thank you so much for your reply and advice mspeedwagon. I really appreciate it. And yeah you're right. I did left out some other info about me.

Ok about me: I had my undergrad degree in a foreign country (Philippines) with a GPA of 2.9. I know its low that's why I really have to concentrate on getting A's. Now, accepted to cal state univ. as a 2nd bach student, BA BIO (have to retake the science courses I had during undergrad + the other pre-reqs.)

Currently, I'm in a new grad RN program (2 years contract which I have to pay the company back if I don't finish the 2 years) so I really need to work full time which is 36 hours/week. So, working part time is not an option for me as of now. My main concern is since my pre-health advisor advised me to take 12 units, (to show med schools that I can handle a full science workload) I might not do well with my pre-requisites because of my full time job.
 

NerdyAndrea

Pre-Med Student
Feb 10, 2010
220
2
0
At my school
Status
Pre-Medical
Take classes wherever you want to. If you like the private school go there if you like the public school go there. I am carrying a 17 credit load, and I am not working. I will work during breaks, but no way could I carry current load, and work. That would be death to my GPA. If you can handle it you have more oomph than I!

I'm at a private school, and for me I like having a small class an access to my teachers. I, however, am also their oldest pre-med student LOL

Andrea
 

mspeedwagon

7+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2009
2,097
450
181
Florida
Status
Medical Student
To answer your question... private vs public does not matter at all (what matters is 4 yr vs 2 yr with 4 yr being seen as far superior).

Name of school doesn't matter at all. I wish it did, since I have an undergrad Ivy degree, but as far as undergrad is concerned, just your GPA and that it was from a 4 yr school are what matter.

I can't speak to how it will affect your preparation for med school, but from what I'm told nothing really prepares you for the workload.


So, would you advise to take classes at a private university where classes are very tough (more difficult to get an A) as opposed to a state university where classes might not be as tough?

How will this be seen by adcoms? How much will the name matter? How much will it affect your preparation for med school?

Thanks for the info. Really appreciate it.:)
 

mspeedwagon

7+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2009
2,097
450
181
Florida
Status
Medical Student
I'm not sure how foreign coursework is counted in AMCAS. What I do know is you need at least 90 credit hrs in the United States for most medical schools. You are starting at a huge disadvantage with your GPA. In your case I would strongly recommend acing the pre-req coursework and checking in with schools you are interested in to see what their policy is about foreign coursework and how many classes you need to take. You need at the very least above a 3.0 and ideally closer to a 3.5 to be competitive.



Thank you so much for your reply and advice mspeedwagon. I really appreciate it. And yeah you're right. I did left out some other info about me.

Ok about me: I had my undergrad degree in a foreign country (Philippines) with a GPA of 2.9. I know its low that's why I really have to concentrate on getting A's. Now, accepted to cal state univ. as a 2nd bach student, BA BIO (have to retake the science courses I had during undergrad + the other pre-reqs.)

Currently, I'm in a new grad RN program (2 years contract which I have to pay the company back if I don't finish the 2 years) so I really need to work full time which is 36 hours/week. So, working part time is not an option for me as of now. My main concern is since my pre-health advisor advised me to take 12 units, (to show med schools that I can handle a full science workload) I might not do well with my pre-requisites because of my full time job.
 

dexorbit

7+ Year Member
Jun 19, 2009
82
3
141
Los Angeles, California
Status
Pre-Medical
Agree w/speedwagon. Whatever gets you A's.

Most premed advisers are not very good, particularly with nontrads. It's not like it's a high-paying job where you're measured by your results.

Before you apply, you should prove that you can handle a full science load. Add working to this, and you prove the crap out of it, but you don't necessarily get extra credit.

As an RN you've got a TON of options as you work through the prereqs, in terms of part time opportunities. Not so with most of us career changers.

Best of luck to you.
Thank you DrMidlife. working part time is not an option for me just yet. So, Ill just have to take it slow. as long as I get A's...

Thanks for your advice!...
 

Nasrudin

Apropos of Nothing
10+ Year Member
Jun 8, 2006
3,515
2,619
281
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Attending Physician
Maligayang pagdating sa lupain ng gatas at pulot.

It's not easy. Doing what you're doing. You'll have to be careful. To many slips and it's hard to get back on it. See if you can get a Fri through Sun 3 pm to 3 am or something like that. That'll open up your week for class times.

As others have said you will need A's. So start with some courses and see how you do. Maybe a math course to gauge your comfort level with the American classroom. Work your way into it slowly. Then you can move up to 12 hours if your getting A's. No need to worry about any more than 10-12. Anyone who thinks that's not enough. Either hasn't done it or sick in the head from working to hard.

Gusto ko sa inyo ang tagumpay sa iyong career.