Work-study Jobs

KaleRG

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Feb 8, 2011
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  1. Medical Student (Accepted)
    I've heard people say that working while in college and having too many extracurricular activities are not good excuses for somewhat low grades. I can understand the extracurricular part, especially because med schools like to see commitment over the long-term, but what about work-study jobs? I've had a work-study job this year in order to help pay for tuition. It was definitely an essential part of my financial aid package. So far, all of my money has gone toward paying off tuition. It hasn't been that big of an issue this year, but next year I am taking upper-level classes, and although I am planning on dropping my hours, I still can't help but feel that it may potentially get in my way a little. I'm not one who likes to make excuses for mistakes, but since my job is necessary for paying for college, would that make any difference at all to med schools?
     

    LossForWords

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    10+ Year Member
    5+ Year Member
    Jul 29, 2008
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      Now, this is not from experience but from what people told me about their work-study experience, so take this with a grain of salt...

      I understand that work-study is done through the college, so that your supervisor should be very aware that your studies come first and foremost (ahead of work). If you work at some outside place, they might not be so understanding and even give you an ultimatum such as "if you don't work X hours this week, you're fired". That might be the sort of thing that might infringe on your ability to get good grades whereas at work study, all of their "employees" are students and no one might really be any more set-upon than any other student-employee.

      In short, work-study supervisors may have more leniency than their real-world supervisors might. (Again, 2nd hand information)
       

      KaleRG

      Full Member
      7+ Year Member
      Feb 8, 2011
      14
      1
      1. Medical Student (Accepted)
        Now, this is not from experience but from what people told me about their work-study experience, so take this with a grain of salt...

        I understand that work-study is done through the college, so that your supervisor should be very aware that your studies come first and foremost (ahead of work). If you work at some outside place, they might not be so understanding and even give you an ultimatum such as "if you don't work X hours this week, you're fired". That might be the sort of thing that might infringe on your ability to get good grades whereas at work study, all of their "employees" are students and no one might really be any more set-upon than any other student-employee.

        In short, work-study supervisors may have more leniency than their real-world supervisors might. (Again, 2nd hand information)

        Well that is definitely true in my case. My supervisor is very lenient about my hours, but the problem I'm having is working the amount of hours in order to make enough money to pay for school. I can see that becoming a bit of a problem, but if I drop my job, that drops a chunk of money that I have to make up with something else in order to pay for college.
         
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        LossForWords

        PGY-1
        10+ Year Member
        5+ Year Member
        Jul 29, 2008
        4,388
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        1. Resident [Any Field]
          Well that is definitely true in my case. My supervisor is very lenient about my hours, but the problem I'm having is working the amount of hours in order to make enough money to pay for school. I can see that becoming a bit of a problem, but if I drop my job, that drops a chunk of money that I have to make up with something else in order to pay for college.

          Well, then I guess you're in the different boat of trying to balance the amount of work vs. the amount of school you need to get by. I wish I could say how much time you need to learn the material adequately to excel in your classes, but I can't. Seems like something you may need to figure out by trial and error.
           

          Astarael

          Full Member
          10+ Year Member
          Mar 25, 2010
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          1. Medical Student
            This is a question that would be better answered by a financial aid adviser at your school. I know that in some cases, dropping your work study will allow you to take out more money in federal loans, which could be potentially helpful. You really need to talk to an adviser to see how it would work out, though.
             

            BAMF

            Full Member
            Feb 12, 2011
            121
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            Ohio
            1. Pre-Medical
              You can get two work study jobs as long as you don't make more than whatever you were awarded. I did this when I was working in the lab as a freshman - half of my hours went to the lab, and the other half was spent in the residence halls at one of those jobs where you get to sit there and do homework all day. I don't know what your responsibilities are right now, but if you're concerned about not earning your entire award and not having enough time, you might want to consider spending some of your time at a job where you can study a bit.
               
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