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medicuk

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Hello there,
I am currently a medical student in the UK and i really want to work in the US when i graduate, but i am just a bit concerned about how well recognised my degree will be. I am at Newcastle University. I know you have to pass exams (USMLE) to work in the US but does where you got yur degree from affect the chance of you getting jobs over in the US? And also, is it ture that the grade you get in the USMLE determines where you get a job?

Thank you lots!!
 

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medicuk said:
Hello there,
I am currently a medical student in the UK and i really want to work in the US when i graduate, but i am just a bit concerned about how well recognised my degree will be. I am at Newcastle University. I know you have to pass exams (USMLE) to work in the US but does where you got yur degree from affect the chance of you getting jobs over in the US? And also, is it ture that the grade you get in the USMLE determines where you get a job?

Thank you lots!!
You have to complete a residency in the US in whatever field of medicine you want to practice - your USMLE score determines where you can do your residency and in what specialty, meaning that residency programs are selective and use USMLE scores, UG grades, and letters of rec. to make their selections.
 

Winged Scapula

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For further information about US residency training, check the following links:

http://www.ecfmg.org

http://www.nrmp.org

The reputation of your medical school will not be a significant factor in obtaining a US residency, especially for someone trained outside of the US (ignoring the arguments over whether the UK if better than Caribbean is better than Mexico...). It will be based more on US elective experience (ie, if this is your last year see if you can set up a rotation or two in the US - the medical system is a fair bit different and you will be one step ahead for US training and US faculty like to see US hospital experience), your USMLE scores and letters of rec.
 
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all41

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it should be emphasized, that as an IMG (international medical graduate), the USMLE scores are most important (especially step 1). I got phone-calls from programs which I applied to for signing a pre-match contract even before they had interviewed me, based on my USMLE scores only!
In addition, a good letter of recommendation from a US ward is very helpful.
 

medicuk

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Thankyou everyone for your replies!

Kimberli Cox said:
For further information about US residency training, check the following links:

http://www.ecfmg.org

http://www.nrmp.org

The reputation of your medical school will not be a significant factor in obtaining a US residency, especially for someone trained outside of the US (ignoring the arguments over whether the UK if better than Caribbean is better than Mexico...). It will be based more on US elective experience (ie, if this is your last year see if you can set up a rotation or two in the US - the medical system is a fair bit different and you will be one step ahead for US training and US faculty like to see US hospital experience), your USMLE scores and letters of rec.
Thanks a lot thats great!!

I am in the first year of a 5 year program at the minute, we have electives in the 4th year - do you reccomend doing this in the US then i presume?
I also might try and do something next summer in America (I have an uncle in NJ i could stay with) - as a 2nd year would i be able to do anything in a hospital - or voluntarily etc? Thanks!
 

Winged Scapula

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medicuk said:
Thankyou everyone for your replies!



Thanks a lot thats great!!

I am in the first year of a 5 year program at the minute, we have electives in the 4th year - do you reccomend doing this in the US then i presume?
I also might try and do something next summer in America (I have an uncle in NJ i could stay with) - as a 2nd year would i be able to do anything in a hospital - or voluntarily etc? Thanks!
Most US elective rotations require that you be in your final year of study to be eligible. Of course, this would be evaluated on a case by case, and school by school basis. I'm not sure if there is a way around this or if you've completed rotations in what the US considers "core" specialties (ie, Medicine, Surgery, Ob-Gyn and Peds) you may be allowed to do an elective in that field during your 4th year.

As a second year medical student you wouldn't likely be able to do anything clinical, although there are research lab options, or less formal arrangements (ie, we have an research assistant who joins us in clinic once a week - he sees patients with us [with their permission of course] but doesn't have any independent, direct clinical contact with patients). There are lots of programs around - and now would be the time to start looking for them for next summer.
 
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