Sep 4, 2016
2
2
Hello, first time posting on here. I'm having trouble deciding how many programs I should be applying to for anesthesia. I am at a lower/mid tier USMD school, and an international student so I will require J1/H-1B sponsorship. Otherwise I think I have a pretty solid app:

Step1: 264, Step2: 263
Junior AOA
All pass in preclinical (pass/fail system), straight As in clinical clerkships
1 anesthesia and 1 ICU letter from away rotations at top institutions, and either anesthesia chair letter or letter from research PI who is an anesthesiologist (which one should I use?)
Extracurriculars: research heavy (3 first author pubs + several abstracts before med school, 1 anesthesia related poster during med school), and a mix of teaching/volunteering/leadership

My school is paranoid and is urging me to apply to 35+ programs. I have no geographic restrictions so I pretty much have most of the top programs and 5-6 safety programs. I'm also applying to prelims as well. I know the expenses are going to be through the roof but just not sure how much the international visa situation will hinder me... Thoughts?
 

DrOwnage

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Oct 12, 2011
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You have an exemplary application. I would say you're throwing money out the window with 35 applications. Your school is just covering their ass. 20 applications would be a good bet, with 3 or so safety schools, and 5-7 prelims (separate from the 20). I assume you will get 15 interviews, and 3-4 prelim interviews with that. Good luck bro.
 

BLADEMDA

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An H1-B visa is a temporary work visa allowing those in specialty occupations to work in the United States. H1-B visas are granted initially for up to three years, and are renewable for another three years. With some exceptions, H1B visas are limited to six years in duration.

Because medicine is defined as a “specialty occupation,” the H1B visa is a good option for any foreign medical graduate (FMG) seeking residency or fellowship training in the U.S., and planning to remain in the U.S. to practice medicine at the completion of that training.

The J-1 visa (Exchange Visitor) also enables FMGs to pursue residency and/or fellowship training in the U.S. While the J-1 Visa is easier to obtain initially, it comes with a requirement that you depart the U.S. at the completion of your training and spend two years in your home country before being able to return to the U.S. This two-year home residency requirement can be difficult to waive.

Therefore, if your intent is to practice medicine in the U.S. following your residency training, the H1-B visa is often the best route to take. With an H1B visa, you will be eligible to begin the process for a obtaining a Green Card without leaving the United States; with a J-1 visa, you will not. Keep in mind, however, that obtaining an H1-B visa and finding a program willing to sponsor you requires some advance planning. Most FMG’s will want to begin this planning prior to completing medical school.

Requirements for getting an H-1B visa as an FMG

To obtain an H1B visa for a fellowship/intern/residency position, you must have the following:

• – Medical Degree from an accredited medical school (in the U.S. or abroad).

• – An offer from a U.S. fellowship or residency program that agrees to H1-B sponsorship. 
(Note: Many programs prefer J-1 visas because ECFMG handles the processing for them, while H1B processing must be handled by the programs themselves.

However, many programs do agree to sponsorship. You should ask your programs directly if they will consider H1B sponsorship in lieu of J-1. Often programs which have a policy of not sponsoring H-1B visas do so because they are simply unfamiliar with the process.)

• – ECFMG certification

• – USMLE Steps I,II & III or FLEX Parts 1 and 2

• – State medical license or other authorization to practice medicine in the state of intended employment. (Most states require medical residents to have state training licenses to practice medicine.)


http://www.visadoctors.com/intro/areas-view/medical-visas/
 

BLADEMDA

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The K1 or K3 (engaged to a US citizen) will take about 9-10 months to get, plus another 3-4 months for a "Employment Authorization Document" application. Advantages: No 6 (H1B) or 7 (J1) year limit, can be converted to 2-year green card right away. Disadvantages: takes >1 year, lot of paperwork/hassle, have to find a citizen to marry. I couldn't actually find anyone who used this path, so consult a lawyer before you try this.

Or, if you have a million dollars sitting around, legally buy a green card: EB-5 Category : A Green Card that you can "Buy": Visa Basics for IMGs, FMGs, Medical Students, Residents, Physicians & Doctors

http://www.valuemd.com/immigration-visa-h1b-j1/223574-j1-h1b-visa-guide.html
 

BLADEMDA

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Apr 22, 2007
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Hello, first time posting on here. I'm having trouble deciding how many programs I should be applying to for anesthesia. I am at a lower/mid tier USMD school, and an international student so I will require J1/H-1B sponsorship. Otherwise I think I have a pretty solid app:

Step1: 264, Step2: 263
Junior AOA
All pass in preclinical (pass/fail system), straight As in clinical clerkships
1 anesthesia and 1 ICU letter from away rotations at top institutions, and either anesthesia chair letter or letter from research PI who is an anesthesiologist (which one should I use?)
Extracurriculars: research heavy (3 first author pubs + several abstracts before med school, 1 anesthesia related poster during med school), and a mix of teaching/volunteering/leadership

My school is paranoid and is urging me to apply to 35+ programs. I have no geographic restrictions so I pretty much have most of the top programs and 5-6 safety programs. I'm also applying to prelims as well. I know the expenses are going to be through the roof but just not sure how much the international visa situation will hinder me... Thoughts?

You will definitely match. You should look for a BIG name like MGH, B and W, Duke, Hopkins, Mayo, UCSF, Stanford, etc. Forget the mid-tier programs. Apply to the best 15-20 in the USA only. The one who offers the MOST to help you with the red tape should be ranked highly. In fact, maybe you can negotiate for an immigration lawyer paid by the program.
 

nimbus

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Jan 14, 2006
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Hello, first time posting on here. I'm having trouble deciding how many programs I should be applying to for anesthesia. I am at a lower/mid tier USMD school, and an international student so I will require J1/H-1B sponsorship. Otherwise I think I have a pretty solid app:

Step1: 264, Step2: 263
Junior AOA
All pass in preclinical (pass/fail system), straight As in clinical clerkships
1 anesthesia and 1 ICU letter from away rotations at top institutions, and either anesthesia chair letter or letter from research PI who is an anesthesiologist (which one should I use?)
Extracurriculars: research heavy (3 first author pubs + several abstracts before med school, 1 anesthesia related poster during med school), and a mix of teaching/volunteering/leadership

My school is paranoid and is urging me to apply to 35+ programs. I have no geographic restrictions so I pretty much have most of the top programs and 5-6 safety programs. I'm also applying to prelims as well. I know the expenses are going to be through the roof but just not sure how much the international visa situation will hinder me... Thoughts?
Try to stay under Trump's radar.
 

Consigliere

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May 28, 2008
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Damn Blade...is there ANYTHING you aren't educated on!? I know the above replies are cut and pasted from websites but, nevertheless, your internet savvy is impressive. I probably learn more here from your posts on a wide variety of topics than anywhere else.