young interest

Discussion in 'Surgery and Surgical Subspecialties' started by aram, Dec 3, 2002.

  1. aram

    aram Junior Member
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    Hi, I am a freshman in highschool, but I am almost done with the first two years of pre-med on the side with a biochem. major, and I plan to be a Cardiothoracic Surgeon when I grow older. I have read many messages in this forum and have learned that CT Surgery is becoming a dying field which greatly upsets me. Though I have no clue about recent technological advances in that field, I would like to ask you, the experienced ones, what does the field entail in today's modern day? Is it still possible to go into this field, or shall I just set my interests towards a more stable field of surgery such as Vascular? Also, could you please inform me as much as possible about the life of a CT surgeon? Thank you

    Sincerely, Justin M. (13)
     
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  3. NE_Cornhusker1

    NE_Cornhusker1 12" Member
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    It's great that you have the sort of drive and the smarts to take college classes at the ripe age of 13. I could only wish to have those traits when I was that age.

    With that being said I would really encourage you "test" yourself if medicine is right for you; become an ER volunteer, an EMT, burn unit volunteer, etc... Make sure that you can handle the blood and guts, the p!ss and puke, and the death and dying that go along caring for patient.

    Best of luck. Peace.
     
  4. and also, u will be applying to med school in another 8 to 9 years, things will definitely have changed then, so focus on ur high school grades and college,and when u get to med school, u can decide, k?
     
  5. Celiac Plexus

    Celiac Plexus Senior Member
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    CT is a great field Justin! However it will still be extremely competitive at the top programs in two years when you will have finished college, med school, and your super-accelerated general surgery residency. May I suggest that in your spare time you do a few things to make yourself more competitive... During recess you can write a best-selling novel set in pre-colonial India about a poor orphan who grows up to be king of Uttar Pradesh. And after school you can spend some time in your dad's garage perfecting your cure for cancer so that you can win the Nobel prize for medicine. And finally, you can spend next Thursday afternoon perfecting a solution to the Middle East conflicts.

    I hope this helps!
     
  6. Castro Viejo

    Castro Viejo Papa Clot Buster
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    It's really incredible when I hear somoene as young as a freshman in high school is taking courses to complete a premed program. Keep up the good work.

    As others have already said, you won't be applying to med school for another 6 to 7 years and things can dramatically change in medicine -- especially in surgery.

    Also your interests may change in the future. When I started med school three and a half years ago, I wanted to be an orthopedic surgeon. Now I'm applying to general surgery and figuring out what I want to do afterwards.

    But to entertain your thoughts, I'll say the following. Everything that you've read about CTS "dying" is something echoed by many academic CT surgeons. The reason being that many of the procedures they once did, the ones they themselves perfected, fell the way of the invasive cardiologist, the interventional radiologist, and all those other people. The idea that CTS as a field "dying" is simply a call to the leaders of CTS to re-invent themselves and re-engineer their roles in cardiothoracic care. They may very well accomplish this in the future.

    Typically CT surgeons nowadays, as others have stated, do mostly bypass operations. Few will venture out into doing valves, and still others will concentrate on the actual thoracic part of their training. The procedures have become fairly routine now, and a lot of CT surgeons even have resorted to hiring physician assistants to do the opening and closing, in order to streamline the process I suppose.

    No matter what happens to CTS, you'll always be able to go into the field. Sometimes it may be more difficult to find a job than at other times, but this is a chance you take with any field from internal medicine to surgery.

    Do what interests you in life. Don't do it for the lifestyle because you'll grow tired of it eventually. My fellow fourth-year med students may not agree with this philosophy, especially those who are going into certain "lifestyle" fields, but that's something you'll decide for yourself.

    When I decided on General Surgery and not Ortho, I was told by a number of people that I was crazy and that I had no desire for a life. They were correct in part because I had no desire for a life where I was not doing something that interested me.

    You should probably ask an actual surgical resident about the life of a CT surgeon, or ask a CT surgeon yourself. If you want my opinion, that of a person who's heard it from probably a fifth or sixth person perspective, CTS is notorious for its long hours and many emergencies. It's also known for its monotony because of the repetitive procedures day in and day out. CT surgeons are known for their hot tempers and their scalpel flinging. CT surgeons are known for their "God complexes" and their general meanness.

    Though this is all I've heard of CT surgeons, the ones that I've met so far have been great, down-to-earth people who are incredibly brilliant. They may be a little pushy at times, but their patients are pretty critical and things need to get done when they need to be done.

    Good luck to you. If you have any questions on admissions or med school, don't hesitate to email me.
     
  7. Jim Picotte

    Jim Picotte Senior Member
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    I can't be the only one concerned that as a freshman in HS, you're taking premed courses in college and already have your future planned. Make sure you live a little, experience life...this is just as important as all those classes you're taking.
     
  8. Crusher

    Crusher Member
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    Hey man...congrats on your motivation...I know many worry about living life, etc. I did 2 years of college my junior and senior year and I can tell you my social life was 100% improved over my first two high school years. First two years of college is a cakewalk anyways and you arent tied up with bull**** busy work...i.e. 15 hours in class versus 35-40 hours per week in high school. Anyways...definitely stay involved at your high school (I still did sports and dances and all that stuff). You are on the right track!
     
  9. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg 1K Member
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    re-do the math immy. It may be much sooner than that :)
     
  10. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg 1K Member
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    Dr. Jim,

    way to discriminate. I'm concerned that the rest of American youth are not as driven as this young man. I speak as someone who was in his shoes: I started college at the same age, and probably under alot of the same educational cirumstances. Yes, we should encourage him to definitely pursue other interests and have experiences, but please, cut the crap condescending tone. It reflects negatively upon you.
     
  11. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg 1K Member
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    I will echo what some people said..

    my social life and development was incredible when I was in college at an early age. Stay involved in sports bro! I was in sports all throughout what would have been my high school years, and it was great! Really the best of both worlds. Do alot of non-medical stuff, but also keep your eye on the goal. If you ever have any questions or need any help, feel free to private message me.

    keep up the good work!
     

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