Menu Icon Search
Close Search

About the ads

Can I change a D.O degree to a M.D degree

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical Allopathic [ MD ]' started by remini, 07.03.00.

  1. remini

    remini New Member

    Joined:
    07.02.00
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    La Puente, CA, USA

    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)
    I want to study allopathic medicine, but I am not sure I can get into any allopathic medical schools. So, I have to consider about osteopathic medical schools, but I know D.O is not my goal. Therefore, is there any state where I can change a D.O degree to a M.D degree?
     
  2. Djanaba

    Djanaba Senior Member

    Joined:
    05.04.00
    Messages:
    676
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    Um... no. That's like asking your school to turn your BA into a BS: the coursework is different, and the change only serves to misrepresent your training.

    There is nothing dishonorable about Doctors of Osteopathy. If you really want an MD, continue with your premed schooling, work your butt off, and get into an MD school. If you want to be a doctor but can't do MD, do DO and be happy that you're fulfilling the dream as best as you are able.
     
  3. youngjock

    youngjock Removed

    Joined:
    06.13.00
    Messages:
    483
    you might be able to, you could transfer after a year or two.

    but i think that it would be really hard to do that.

     
  4. jawurheemd

    jawurheemd xx ToXiC xx

    Joined:
    08.08.99
    Messages:
    160
    Location:
    Illinois
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    Once upon a time in California it was possible to change the DO degree to an MD degree for a small fee. Most of the DO's deed in fact take up that offer -- I'm not sure why, but they did. They don't do this anymore though.

    [This message has been edited by jawurheemd (edited 07-03-2000).]
     
  5. reed0104

    reed0104 Senior Member

    Joined:
    01.14.99
    Messages:
    144
    Location:
    Little Canada, MN
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    Just go foreign, Carribean or whatever. I am curious as to your stats as D.O. and M.D. admissions stats aren't to different.

    What are your stats?
     
  6. aecuenca

    aecuenca Senior Member

    Joined:
    09.27.99
    Messages:
    148
    Location:
    San Diego, CA USA
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    remini

    If D.O. is not your goal, then don't apply. If you are concerned about what title you will have at the end of your medical school, then don't apply to D.O. schools. Because once you get your D.O. degree, you may have to explain what that is to your patients.

    My suggestion....do some research on the field of osteopathic medicine and talk to D.O.'s. Perhaps this will help in your decision.

    Best of luck to you.

    Arnold
    WESTERN U/COMP CLASS OF 2004
    http://members.xoom.com/omasucsd/logo.htm
     
  7. ms

    ms Member

    Joined:
    11.18.99
    Messages:
    40
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    check out www.windsor.edu (under heading medical program for health care profesionals) they have a program to issue a MD degree to DO's.

    Do you think it is just a way for Windsor University to make money or a legimate degree program?
     
  8. MTY

    MTY

    how about that?

    ms,
    i checked that www.windsor.edu website, and what an interesting info that they posted there.

    i wonder if the MD that students received from windsor univ will enable them to practice in the united states. but still, u have a DO to practice, so there shouldn't be any worry.

    maybe i will call them to find out how this works. if anyone has additional info, pls share with us.


     
  9. nmehta211

    nmehta211 Member

    Joined:
    01.26.00
    Messages:
    37
    Location:
    Windsor, CT USA
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    this is quite interesting. But i do wonder if this is any different than the caribbean medical schools that people could have chosen to go to instead of entering a DO school. I mean, most people could have chosen to go to the island schools if they really wanted an MD instead of the DO and couldn't get inton US allopathic schools. The reputation of the osteopathic school becomes meaningless because the MD degree is issued by Windsor university, not the osteopathic school. Thoughts anyone?
     
  10. ms

    ms Member

    Joined:
    11.18.99
    Messages:
    40
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    If you obtained a MD degree from windsor through this program, You would most likely use your DO degree for licensure and hospital privileges. Since MD degree is from windsor, a non LCME accredited program, you would need to obtain ECFMG( www.ECFMG.org )cerfification in order to use the MD degree for licensure.
    My guess is that DO's who obtain an MD degree this way, want to have a MD title to show patients.

    Is it worth obtain a MD degree from windsor U this way?

    [This message has been edited by ms (edited 07-07-2000).]
     
    AspiringERMD likes this.
  11. MTY

    MTY

    ms and nmehta211

    i think you're right. DO docs getting MD from windsor is really to show their patients about their 'licenses'. getting a residency with a MD from windsor probably would have a less chance than getting a residency with a DO, but i assume you save the trouble of explaining to your patients when they question your degree. again, by then, DO might be so well-known across every state 7 years down the road, it might even be recognized internationally. who knows what will happen.

    for mehta211, i think the main difference in doing this 'windsor' pathway compare to going to caribbean med school is that you don't have to live in that island for 4 years. also, you don't have to worry about getting a good residency training or be able to practice in the states because you already have a DO.

    now my question is..who has gone through this pathway? it's always nice to hear some 'real' feedback from others.
     
  12. youngjock

    youngjock Removed

    Joined:
    06.13.00
    Messages:
    483
    oh, i know, i know this one!

    it was in 1962, <<The college of osteopathic physicians and surgeons, los angeles>> was converted to an md school. That is where today's usc med school located.

    At that time, about 2500 DOs paid only $65, they were granted with the MD degrees! Life sure was easy for them.

    And there was a law prohibiting any new licenses to DOs in california. The court fight lasted until 1974. That is 12 years of absense of DOs.

     
  13. Stephen Ewen

    Stephen Ewen

    Joined:
    02.05.00
    Messages:
    2,012
    Location:
    Somewhere in Micronesia
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    There are laws which perit foreign medical graduates who hold medical degrees equivilent to the M.D. degree (e.g., MB BS, BCh Mb, etc.) to write themselves as an M.D. As I understand it from one particular D.O., D.O.s of yesteryear--when the D.O. degree was newly a full medical degree but was still an albatros of sorts--won the right to write themselves, too, as M.D.s. This same D.O., according to him, DOES write himself as an M.D., LEGALLY, in the state of Texas. I understand there is one or two other such states out there. However, I hasten to add this is hearsay, and I have not researched this to ultimate sources.
     
  14. MTY

    MTY

    yougjock,
    so are you saying that usc med school orginally came from the osteopathic college of physicians in LA?

    that's very interesting to hear.
     
  15. Future DOc

    Future DOc Senior Member

    Joined:
    11.30.99
    Messages:
    258
    Location:
    upland,CA,USA
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    Nice try, youngjock & good synopsis!

    However, the College of Osteopathic Physicians & Surgeons of Los Angeles back then is now UC Irvine Medical School you have today....not USC SOM.

    The legal battle that was fought to the Supreme Court & won by 7 DOs back in the sixties lead to the development of College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific or now WesternU/COMP in the 70s! Just a little history there....

    Rob
    MS III
     
  16. Pilot

    Pilot Senior Member

    Joined:
    03.04.00
    Messages:
    430
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    From "The Difference a D.O. Makes" by Bob Jones (sorry, it is long, but interesting):

    "In 1954, help in the battle for professional recognition and acceptance (for D.O.'s) came from an unlikely source - Dr. John Cline, President of the AMA. He urged his governing board to take the necessary steps for acceptance of osteopathic physicians. He called for removal of the cultist stigma with whcih hsi colleagues had randed D.O.'s and advocated altering the policy of prohibiting M.D.'s from teaching in osteopathic colleges.

    Up to this time, the AMA's most formidable weapon was its charge that osteopathic colleges were inferior - and, it followed, their graduates were inferior. On Dr. Cline's initiative, his board appointed a committee - chaired by Dr. Cline himself - to evaluate the quality of training that was being given in six major osteopathic colleges. One declined to undergo the review.

    The following year, Dr. Cline reported on the exhaustive studies that his group had conducted. The report, presented to the AMA's House of Delegates meeting in New York, concluded that there were no significant differences between the educational programs of allopathic and osteopathic colleges. The committee pointed to some minor weaknesses, but these could be overcome by some changes in faculty.

    Since the report failed to substantiate those hoary charges that osteopathic medicine was a cult, it precipitated violent debate. And when the House of Delegates voted, the Cline committee's report was rejected....." [pp. 35-36]

    Another committee was appointed and the same conclusions and results occured in 1954.

    "Progress both within and outside the (Osteopathic) profession had encouraged a lull of contentment in some circles, but in 1961, the calm and complacency were shattered by a bombshell in California, the stronghold of osteopathic medicine. When the smoke cleared, the D.O.'s found that most of the hospitals in the state had dropped their osteopathic relationships, and the osteopathic college itself had been converted into an M.D. institution. And 85% of the state's D.O.'s had traded their earned Doctor of Osteopathy degree and sixty-five dollars to boot for an alien piece of paper that identified them as M.D. graduates of the rechristened college.

    All this came about through an incredible series of events. Although the procedures eventually were ruled unconstitutional, their impact was severe.

    The first and most important phase of the Califonia Medical Association's strategy had been to convert the College of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons in Los Angeles to the California College of Medicine. The college, founded in 1896 as the Pacific College of Osteopathy, was not only the largest of six osteopathic institutions across the nation in terms of enrollment but was also widely regarded one of the best.

    in its first act, the newly reconstituted college granted M.D. degrees to its faculty. Then it handed out M.D. degrees to 2,400 California D.O.'s, who agreed to the conversion, including Dr. Vincent P. Carroll, a past president of the American Osteopathic Association. Meanwhile, 260 loyal D.O.'s shunned the new degree letters offered them.

    In 1962, the voters of California approved Proposition 22, which prohibited further licensing of D.O.'s - only those licensed by the state would be able to practice. That meant that the only new physicians in California would be M.D.'s.

    Many commentators saw the California debacle as the death knell for osteopathic medicine in America. If the profession could be practically wiped out in the state where it had been the strongest, the observers reasoned, then what chance was there for survival in the weaker states?......

    Unwittingly, the AMA had surrendered one of its biggest guns - the charge the osteopathic training was incomplete and faulty. If 2,400 graduates of osteopathic colleges were deemed worthy of Doctor of Medicine degrees, then logic would suggest that the degrees were interchangeable adn of equal value - excluding the ludicrous aspect of teh sixty-five dollar fee. In an even more convincing act of blessing, the AMA elected Dr. Vincent P. Carroll, the past AOA president, for membership in its House of Delegates." [pp. 36-39]

    "The California episode stimulated osteopathic medicine accross the nation;.... And although the long-standing osteopathic college has been lost, 1978 saw the opening of the new College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific, at Pamona, California.

    Sorry this post was so long. I thought it was interesting, and explained a little of the transitions of medical schools in California, as well as the D.O. to M.D. transition which has been previously mentioned in other threads. The book was published in 1978, so it may be a little out of date (i.e College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific apparently changing to WesternU/COMP). Any mispelling are my fault. BTW - Bob Jones passed away in 1999 after a long illness. Pilot.
     
  17. youngjock

    youngjock Removed

    Joined:
    06.13.00
    Messages:
    483
    No, future doc, u are so obviously wrong.

    suppose it was uc Irvine, where is uc Irvine
    located? mmm, it is not even close to los angeles.

    let's take ucla for instance. it is called uc, Los Angeles, because it is still close by even though it is not in the heart of los angeles. Where is the city of Irvine, it is at least 50 miles away from los angeles, and i don't think that it is even in the county of los angeles.

    Therefore, you are wrong.

    On the other hand, I knew that it was usc because a DO told me so. And it makes sense since usc's school of medicine is actually located in the city of los angeles. And there are only two allopathic med. schools in los angeles, one is ucla, one is usc.

    So I believe that usc's school of medicine was the orginal "College of Osteopathic Physicians & Surgeons of Los Angeles."


     
  18. Snoopy

    Snoopy Senior Member

    Joined:
    06.10.00
    Messages:
    231
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    As with so many other things on this board, youngjock, it appears that you are the one that is wrong. Out of curiousity I decided to investigate this debate. It seems that UC Irvine does in fact have its roots in the College of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons (see text below). COPS has nothing to do with USC. Maybe people should investigate things more fully before posting them on a board and proclaiming them as fact.

    "From its birth as an osteopathic college 100 years ago, to its present incarnation, the College of Medicine of the University of California, Irvine has undergone many changes. Founded by Dr. Aubrey C. Moore, who had recently graduated from the American School of Osteopathy, and Dr. B.W. Scheuer, an M.D. with German and American training, the school was chartered on June 1, 1896 as a private institution under the name Pacific Sanitarium and School of Osteopathy. Later that year, twelve students began classes leading to the Diplomat of Osteopathy (D.O.) degree in the former Hotel Del Campo building in Anaheim, California. The school ' s two-year curriculum (10 months per year) was patterned after the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia. Tuition was $250.

    "The first full class graduated in 1898 and included valedictorian Dain L. Tasker among its nine graduates. Although PSO began graduating osteopathic physicians in 1898, there was still no law in California permitting the practice of osteopathy. Due to the efforts of Dr. Tasker, who went to Sacramento to educate legislators about the practice of osteopathy, the profession was first legally recognized on March 9, 1901, albeit without the governor's approval. It would be many years before a law was established permitting the practice of osteopathy in California.

    "In 1902, the school relocated to a former South Pasadena hotel and became known as the South Pasadena Osteopathic Sanitarium. The following year, the school relocated and expanded again in Pasadena, establishing lab facilities for chemical, histological and bacteriological research. In 1903, PSO lengthened its curriculum from two to three years and began awarding the Doctor of Science of Osteopathy (D.O.). The following year, the PSO experienced another major reorganization, emerging as the Pacific College of Osteopathy. In May of 1904, the school purchased property on Mission and Daly Streets, across from the Los Angeles County Hospital.

    "In September of 1905, instruction began at the Los Angeles College of Osteopathy (LACO), formally the Still College of Osteopathy of Des Moines, IA, in downtown Los Angeles. In its first year of operation, the LACO matriculated 96 students and graduated 38. Tuition was $150. Prior to its opening, the owners of LACO attempted a takeover of PCO, claiming 80% ownership of PCO stock. Philosophical differences and ensuing animosities made integration of the two schools impossible at the time, however, and LACO became an independent institution. Although LACO proceeded with groundbreaking for a new building at 321 South Hill Street, the school was having difficulty establishing itself with regulatory agencies. The State Board of Osteopathic Examiners initially refused to recognize LACO as a qualified college and to register diplomas of LACO graduates because they had only taken a two-year program. The LACO was also refused membership to the AAOC.

    "The PCO curriculum was lengthened one year once again in 1909, with the granting of the combined M.D.-D.O. degree. This last change was due in part to the repeal of the Medical and Osteopathic Acts in 1907 and regulation of both professions being placed under one State Board. The granting of the M.D. degree met with a great deal of opposition, however, and was withdrawn one year later after the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) meeting.

    "On July 21, l914, the two schools merged and were incorporated under the educational laws of the State of California as the College of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons (C.O.P.S.). Both schools continued to maintain separate alumni associations until June of 1921, when graduates of both colleges felt a single combined association would be most effective.

    "In 1918, the University of Southern California (USC) School of Medicine closed its doors, thus making C.O.P.S. the only medical school in Los Angeles. Although USC would reopen it?s medical school in 1928, its closure made C.O.P.S. the oldest continually operating medical school in the Los Angles area.

    "Throughout the 1920s and 1930s, C.O.P.S. continued to expand its clinical and educational facilities and programs. In 1928, Los Angeles County Hospital Unit II opened, with a total bed capacity of 196. From 1929 to 1930, new administrative facilities and an auditorium, Phinney Hall, were erected on the site across from the hospital. The clinic operated by the school on South Hill Street was relocated to the campus in 1934. In 1936 a graduate school, offering both masters and doctoral degrees, was established."

    For full information go to: http://www.com.uci.edu/Hypertext/history.html
     
  19. Future DOc

    Future DOc Senior Member

    Joined:
    11.30.99
    Messages:
    258
    Location:
    upland,CA,USA
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    No offense, youngjock, but formulating conclusions based soley on someone (Did the DO graduate from COMP?) just telling you or b/c cities don't match up is not very sound judgement. Please do more research before coming to conclusions, not just the latter.

    Aside from the above evidence presented above, the same materials were presented to WesternU medical students during orientation, so I believe I was correct with my statement that UC Irvine Medcial College was originally College of Osteopathic Physicians & Surgeons of Los Angeles....plus we had a test queestion on it! [​IMG]

    This whole California DO vs MD debate, COP&S turning into an MD school back in the day had one thing attached to it....the birth of COMP, which is where I am at presently. So, my statement does have some warrant & validity PLUS its true...b/c I answered that test question correctly! Believe me....

    Rob
    MS III

    [This message has been edited by Future DOc (edited 07-09-2000).]
     
  20. KCOM2015

    KCOM2015

    Joined:
    03.20.13
    Messages:
    16
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I have the same question!!! Particularly with the "merger" coming up from 2015-2020.

    Does anybody have any new information on whether this may be possible moving forward?
     
    Itisneverlupus likes this.
  21. AlteredScale

    AlteredScale SDN Bronze Donor Bronze Donor

    Joined:
    05.10.13
    Messages:
    1,755
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    I think we have a winner for the oldest necrobump ever. 14 years!!!!

    The merger itself isn't complete until 2020 and I can guarantee it will take years before there is even consideration for a merger of degrees because you have to take into consideration that most MD schools are affiliated with research universities and healthcare systems while many DO schools are simply independent.
     
    Last edited: 10.31.14
  22. allenlchs

    allenlchs SDN Gold Donor Gold Donor

    Joined:
    01.27.13
    Messages:
    1,197
    Location:
    Transylvania
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I don't think DO schools will ever start giving MD degrees. That will just not happen.
     
  23. repititionition

    repititionition Sure!

    Joined:
    02.29.12
    Messages:
    239
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    One can easily get an M.D. after earning a D.O.

    It just requires four more years of allopathic medical school.
     
  24. Osteopath999

    Osteopath999

    Joined:
    05.28.14
    Messages:
    136
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    Hmmmm how about MD/DO like the father of osteopathic medicine Dr. A.T. Still, MD, DO. Im afraid if it that occurs, some people will be jealous... :whistle:
     
    user3 likes this.
  25. Boolean

    Boolean

    Joined:
    10.14.13
    Messages:
    1,443
    It's almost as if you invent something you can then reap the benefits of that something.
     
  26. AlteredScale

    AlteredScale SDN Bronze Donor Bronze Donor

    Joined:
    05.10.13
    Messages:
    1,755
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    Let's just call it DP for Doctorate of Physician.
     
  27. cryhavoc

    cryhavoc

    Joined:
    04.20.14
    Messages:
    196
    Location:
    Park Row
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    D.O.'s work at every major hospital, can become any type of doctor, but you're worried about the letters at the end of your name?

    I mean, if you are becoming a doctor just to be a snob around other doctors, than by all means, just apply to allopathic schools and don't go until you get in one. Or if the thought of having to explain to a patient what DO school is enough to shatter your fragile self-esteem, then just apply to allopathic schools. But if you're becoming a doctor to help people, or are just genuinely interested in medicine, apply to both and be happy wherever you get in. You might even get into both and then you can go allopathic, if you feel it will help you get a residency easier or something.
     
    BJJ likes this.
  28. Osteopath999

    Osteopath999

    Joined:
    05.28.14
    Messages:
    136
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    Lol we'll have DO and MD residency merger.... Now we have DO and MD degree merger? :)....
     
  29. AlteredScale

    AlteredScale SDN Bronze Donor Bronze Donor

    Joined:
    05.10.13
    Messages:
    1,755
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    Lol Pretty soon we will have an NP PA merger and RN EMT-P merger!
     
  30. ChiTownBHawks

    ChiTownBHawks

    Joined:
    09.17.13
    Messages:
    522
    .
     
    Last edited: 10.31.14
    AlteredScale likes this.
  31. J Senpai

    J Senpai I'm a gryphon now. Gryphons are cool. Bronze Donor

    Joined:
    06.26.11
    Messages:
    3,145
    Location:
    Empire State of the South
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    And a DMD/DDS merger...wait. You don't need one because no one fekin cares.

    lol @ the necrobump
     
    AlteredScale and ChiTownBHawks like this.
  32. AlteredScale

    AlteredScale SDN Bronze Donor Bronze Donor

    Joined:
    05.10.13
    Messages:
    1,755
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    so DOMD OR MDDO? Hahaha!
     
    Last edited: 10.31.14
  33. AlteredScale

    AlteredScale SDN Bronze Donor Bronze Donor

    Joined:
    05.10.13
    Messages:
    1,755
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    Dude 14 years. fourteen!!
     
  34. J Senpai

    J Senpai I'm a gryphon now. Gryphons are cool. Bronze Donor

    Joined:
    06.26.11
    Messages:
    3,145
    Location:
    Empire State of the South
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    I were but a wee lad playing Pokemon on my game boy color.

    Per the DO vs. MBBS thread, we should have one giant merger:

    MDDOMBBSBMBSMBChBMBBChMMedMDCMDr.MuDDr.MedCand.medMed

    Only seems fair.
     
  35. Osteopath999

    Osteopath999

    Joined:
    05.28.14
    Messages:
    136
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    That would freak me out with such degree initials on the white coat !
     
  36. J Senpai

    J Senpai I'm a gryphon now. Gryphons are cool. Bronze Donor

    Joined:
    06.26.11
    Messages:
    3,145
    Location:
    Empire State of the South
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    Yeah, they have to print them down the arm.
     
    ChiTownBHawks likes this.
  37. Itisneverlupus

    Itisneverlupus SDN Gold Donor Gold Donor Bronze Donor

    Joined:
    03.01.11
    Messages:
    182
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    Wow I spit my beer out...what an epic necrobump, OP!

    Can't drink now, since I can't stop laughing :)
     
  38. AlteredScale

    AlteredScale SDN Bronze Donor Bronze Donor

    Joined:
    05.10.13
    Messages:
    1,755
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    I was selling my Pokemon cards at that age :( idk why I did that I could have made more if I sold them now.

    We should all add MDDO to our usernames. Hahaa
     
    J Senpai likes this.
  39. MrLogan13

    MrLogan13

    Joined:
    05.16.14
    Messages:
    505
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    This is an impressive necropost, indeed.
     
  40. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    12.20.04
    Messages:
    28,065
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Physician SDN 10+ Year Member
    The question was somewhat relevant in 2000 because at that time osteopathy was small and actually didn't have many of the same privileges as it does now. It has taken years for that field to reach the functional equivalence of allo that it has today. Now in 2014 the desire for an MD comes off as petty and trollish. The answer is no, if you are in osteopathic med school now you are likely never going to have an MD. With the merger it will eventually be like law, where everybody new gets a JD, and a few of the old timers in practice still have an LLB behind their name instead. Still means the same, just tells you the guy went to law school when dinosaurs roamed the earth. The same fate will befall DO.
     
    southernIM likes this.
  41. DoctorSynthesis

    DoctorSynthesis The worlds most interesting (future) med student

    Joined:
    06.08.13
    Messages:
    1,604
    Location:
    all over
    Status:
    Pre-Medical, Medical Student (Accepted)
    What privalages didn't DOs have then? What?


    And I have been thinking about this lately. I used to be split on the issue. I never really cared one way or the other. Used to think just give DOs an MD with a designation in osteopathy to avoid confusion. Now I think its better to have MDs and DOs. It should be emphasized that they are equivalent though. I like the idea of having the DO since it makes me different and DO represents a really fascanating history. It represents a lot of good things to be proud of.
     
    AlteredScale likes this.
  42. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    12.20.04
    Messages:
    28,065
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Physician SDN 10+ Year Member
    DOs couldn't get medical licenses in all states until the 70s. They weren't recognized as "equivalent" degrees by AMA or AMSA or the AAMC (ie the allo world) until organizational statements in about 2005. They still have minimal representation in certain geographic regions/hospitals and certain allo dominated competitive fields. This whole equivalent but different degree is actually an extremely new phenomenon, which is why older doctors (and your parents generation) probably have trouble wrapping their mind around the concept -- when they were in school DOs were a non-equivalent schism working in different hospitals, unable to prescribe meds). A merger will end this whole line of confusion (and end the independent identity of osteopathy, probably).
     
    Last edited: 11.01.14
  43. DoctorSynthesis

    DoctorSynthesis The worlds most interesting (future) med student

    Joined:
    06.08.13
    Messages:
    1,604
    Location:
    all over
    Status:
    Pre-Medical, Medical Student (Accepted)
    I really hope the independent identidy doesn't die and I don't think it will. I think there is still plenty that is unique that DOs offer to the medical community.

    But you said in 2000 they didn't have certain privalages. So I don't get why you brought up the 70s? And I don't see how a lack of representation or not being recognized as equals by the allopathic world translates into lack of privlages. In 2000 DOs were fully licensed physicians. They could write prescriptions, do surgery, and anything else an allopathic doctor could. I really don't think in 2000 this was a legitimate question to ask. Curious as to what others think.
     
  44. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    12.20.04
    Messages:
    28,065
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Physician SDN 10+ Year Member
    Few to no DOs were credentialed to work at some of the hospitals I've been at in 2000. Now many are. The world has very recently changed for DO.

    Yes the DO will likely lose it's identity because frankly this isn't a merger of equals. The number of DO students is a small fraction of allopathic, and most of what is unique about the DO philosophy will be wiped out in what is clearly a takeover. OMM will become an elective. Separate residencies will go away. The difference in philosophy will just be a Footnote on Wiki. Most of the people in DO schools won't care -- they don't want to be thought of as different. Osteo has no choice but to succumb to a takeover because they have more students than internal residency slots and allo medicine is rapidly growing to fill spots in the allo match -- it's a game of chicken with a Mack truck.
     
    gettheleadout likes this.
  45. Doctor Bob

    Doctor Bob

    Joined:
    02.12.09
    Messages:
    1,178
    Location:
    St. Louis
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    Physician Faculty Air Force SDN 5+ Year Member
    I want to get a DOMG!
     
    AlteredScale likes this.
  46. DoctorSynthesis

    DoctorSynthesis The worlds most interesting (future) med student

    Joined:
    06.08.13
    Messages:
    1,604
    Location:
    all over
    Status:
    Pre-Medical, Medical Student (Accepted)
    While I agree its better for DOs now it wasnt bad in 2000 either. I was very young in 2000 so I don't remember though but from what I read they seem to be doing well. I know people who were DOs doing competitive allo residencies in 80s / 90s

    I also severely doubt OPP is going anywhere. Why would it. And DOs certainly won't become MDs in the future.
     
  47. AlteredScale

    AlteredScale SDN Bronze Donor Bronze Donor

    Joined:
    05.10.13
    Messages:
    1,755
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    That would be amazing!
     
Similar Threads
  1. DO Reformer
    Replies:
    221
    Views:
    14,392
  2. cephalexinRX
    Replies:
    240
    Views:
    26,202
Loading...

// Share //

Style: SDN Universal