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1 Year Masters Programs

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by A1phaZer0, Apr 15, 2002.

  1. I have been unsure of my chances of getting in to med school and was looking at Post-Bacc programs, but they really arent geared to those who took pre-med course of study and didnt do well, but then someone mentioned these 1 year masters programs, which sounds more of what I am looking for.

    Can anyone point me to a site that lists these 1 year masters programs? or can someone write a reply listing the schools that offer them? Also any opinions on the quality of the different programs is greatly appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. Sonya

    Sonya Senior Member
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    what major?
    WashU
     
  3. tater tot

    tater tot Member
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    you can search the forum for this info..... there have been previous posts.

    i know Georgetown, Boston U, Finch, MCP and a NJ school all offer 1 yr programs.
    look-out...these tuitions can be a killer! <img border="0" alt="[Wowie]" title="" src="graemlins/wowie.gif" />
     
  4. What major was I? I was an Bio undergrad, Biology and Forensic Psychology Masters, and a second undergrad in Forensic Biochemistry.
     
  5. specialk

    specialk Member
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    Auburn University in Alabama has really good ones, and you can get in-state residency for one of the 2 med schools. UAB is a really good med school, and they take A LOT of the in state applicants.
    good luck
     
  6. Forensic Chick

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    Mike -- where did you go for the Forensic degrees?? I've been looking for a good Master's program for Forensic Science - but I've yet to find a decent one on the west coast...
     
  7. Bump... I need more info, help me out people! :)
     
  8. EpiII

    EpiII Senior Member
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    I thought post-baccs were for anyone who did not do that well as far as GPA is concerned. If you need to boost your GPA, post bacc is your only choice. A master's degree is graduate studies and those grades are not factored into the equation at most schools.

    If you do not need to increase GPA, but are interested in trying to stand out, then a Master's degree is good, but I am not sure a one year Master's will do too much. Everyone knows that anything worthwhile takes time. You probably learn about half as much in a 1 year program as you would in a 2 year program.
     
  9. medicine2006

    medicine2006 Happy Pisces
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    I agree 100% with Epi. Everyone knows that 1-year masters programs are just big money making schemes for the schools. By the time you reapply you probably won't even have your 1st semester grades yet. Nothing has changed since the last time you applied. Go with the 2-year programs. Adcoms know the difference between the fluff programs and the programs with real substance. I hope I do not offend those who did a 1-year program but I believe that 2 year programs are better for the student.
     
  10. Marathoner

    Marathoner New Member

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    I just wanted to post some more information about Special Master's and Post-Bac Programs. I was a student in the Georgetown Special Master's Program (SMP) last year and I also currently work for the same program while reapplying to medical school (I have been accepted for 2002). To begin with, special masters and post-bac programs are different and should not be confused; many people use these terms interchangeable. Post-bacs are for students who need to finish their pre-med requirements whereas special master's programs are for students who have already completed the pre-med requirements and are looking for a way to strengthen their academic credentials for medical school application. Special master's programs are generally a year in length, although as mentioned, some do run 2 years (Boston University, for example). As for whether a one-year or two-year program is better, that really depends on the individual and what their needs are. Many students trying to get into medical school only want to take an additional year off, so a one-year program is ideal. For students wanting to also pursue research, a two-year program may be better, since many of these incorporate research. As for the success of special master's students at getting into medical school, I can only speak for the Georgetown Program, but we generally have 50-60% of our students get into med school during the year they are in the program (so they matriculate to med school right away the next fall) and our oveall acceptance rate is 85%. Since the classes for SMP students at Georgetown are set up on a modified block schedule, grades can be reported to medical schools throughout the year and thus, students are constantly adding new infromation to their medical school applications.

    This is all I can think to write now, but it anyone is interested, please check out the two following website for information on both post-bacs and special master's programs:

    <a href="http://www.go.to/physio" target="_blank">www.go.to/physio</a> (Georgetown SMP site)
    www-hl.syr.edu:80/hpap/ (site with numerous programs listed)
     
  11. Qafas

    Qafas Jarhead
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    Hi everyone,
    first of all, Marathoner makes a very crucial distinction between Post-bacc and Special Master's programs. Indeed, Post-bacc programs are for those who haven't had much science and those who need preparation for the MCATs. SMPs, on the other hand, are for those who have completed the pre-reqs and have taken the MCATs, but who haven't performed well during undergrad.
    I am currently at the MCP Hahnemann SMP, and can shed some light on the program. Hahnemann, btw, has both a post-bacc and an SMP. What I like most about the SMP here is that it offers you a choice between 1 and 2 years. I might be wrong, but I think this is the only program that does that.
    During the first year, we take many of the same classes (approx. 75%) as the first-year med students. That gives some basis for med schools to gauge our performance relative to MS1's. I applied to med schools last year, and have been accepted to one (Yay!!). As such, I will not be sticking around for the second year. However, if you should not get in the first year, or if you simply choose not to apply, you have the option of completing the second year and getting your master's degree. There is a minimum req. (I think) of a 3.0 GPA during your first year, if you wish to stay on for the second.
    I think someone mentioned that 1 year SMPs are not a wise choice b/c at best med schools get to see only one semester's grades. Well, that is true. However, most med schools will wait for that one semester's grades before they make a decision. The transcripts are sent out in early Jan, which is not all that bad. It worked for me, and I know it has worked for many of my colleagues. In fact, very few students stay on for the second year, which means that most get their acceptances during the first. From what I hear, we have an acceptance rate of around 70%, and it is even higher for those who do both years.
    Yes, going to one of these programs is quite expensive....the same as a year of med school. But, if you are hell-bent on going into medicine, and are in need of boosting your undergrad record, I think it is worth it. I applied to med school once before, but didn't get in. At 3.0, my GPA was simply too low. But, this program has done the trick for me! I, therefore, definitely recommend looking into them.
    Good luck to all in your respective pursuits!
     
  12. CoffeeCat

    CoffeeCat SDN Angel
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    Marathoner-
    I was hoping you could answer a few more questions

    1. How has the physio program factored into your application - are there certain schools which pay special attention to it? What about the UCs? I heard something about them not counting the new grades?

    2. How competitive/difficult is it? What sort of curves are there? I know that the classes are scored against the med student's curve but is it curved with the other students? Can everyone get an A?

    3. How much debt will you be in from this year?!

    4. How time consuming is it?

    5. Do you enjoy it? Have you met cool people?

    Thanks!!
     
  13. Homer J. Simpson

    Homer J. Simpson 1st and goal from the 1 yard line.
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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Marathoner:
    <strong>
    www-hl.syr.edu:80/hpap/ (site with numerous programs listed)</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">This link does not work.
     
  14. Big Bill

    Big Bill Senior Member
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    have to disagree with epi and medicine 2006, i am in a certificate that might as well be a masters and many of my classmates are on the wait list which is what they do here use certificates as the waitlist. have already seen several get in and no of a few that have gotten in elsewhare. Think about it if you take molecular biology at the graduate level and get an A isnt that better than an A at the undergrad. plus these programs are intense. There is also one other benefit here and that is you get a lot of the same professors as the medical school does. I think it is a great way to go.

    Semper Fi Qafas.
     
  15. Big Bill

    Big Bill Senior Member
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    have to disagree with epi and medicine 2006, i am in a certificate that might as well be a masters and many of my classmates are on the wait list which is what they do here use certificates as the waitlist. have already seen several get in and no of a few that have gotten in elsewhare. Think about it if you take molecular biology at the graduate level and get an A isnt that better than an A at the undergrad. plus these programs are intense. There is also one other benefit here and that is you get a lot of the same professors as the medical school does. I think it is a great way to go.

    Semper Fi Qafas.
     
  16. HippocratesX

    HippocratesX Member
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    I think all of you have made good points, but I have to ask: What makes you think you can get an A in molecular biology at the grad school level, when you were NOT able to do it at the undergrad level? Most of the reasons people don't do well academically in undergrad is because they have not learned to study or in a few rare cases, some illness or extenuating circumstance has kept them from performing at their potential. I know that SMPs and postbaccs may seem like a saving grace or a second shot (and perhaps they are for those who are close to being competitive with a 3.0-3.3), but It seems to me that 4 years of messing up calls for a little more then good grades for one or two semesters. And even those good grades are a big "IF". If you haven't learned why you did poorly and solved that problem, then its highly unlikely that you'll perform much better in graduate school...even if the program is "designed" for that. Also, if you're not willing to put in the needed/required time to increase your gpa and become a truly reformed/competitive candidate for med school, then perhaps medicine really isn't for you? Ofcourse, I'm not one to tell you what IS and IS NOT for you, but it's good to think about it. I know that we are all concerned about "getting in", but really the problems and roadblocks don't end once you're accepted. There are 4 long years of medical school, then a tough residency program for another 3-6 years. A lot of people seem to have the impression that once they have an acceptance, they'll be able to wing it, or just survive and make it through. But I don't think that's the case.

    I had to figure out the things that kept me from doing well academically, and then find a way to fix them. But it's not a quick fix. I was tempted by these postbaccs and SMPs just like so many of you are, but for some of us, its really NOT the answer. It might take a second bachelors degree or continuing education (outside of a formal postbacc program), but I think its definitely worth it if you feel medicine is for you. And if its not worth it, then you'll know right away that you are doing it for the wrong reasons. Well, that's just my $.02. Anything worth having, is worth working hard(er) for, even if it takes time. I don't remember who it was, but somebody had a signature quote in here that I really liked, which said, don't ask questions that you already know the answers too-hoping that you'll find a different answer or a shortcut (except for it was much more eloquently written). Okay, enough blabbering..... :p
     
  17. Big Bill

    Big Bill Senior Member
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    Hippocrates you make an excellent point yet a lot of these programs are filled with non-science majors like myself who never took molecular biology at the undergrad level. take a step back and look at it if I get an A in that course at the graduate level shouldnt it be stronger or as strong as the A for the biology major when we are placed beside each other. Secondly alot of my classmates worked or have families and that may have precluded them from reaching their full potential.
    I would have to say that these programs are a success. To tell you a story there is a surgeon in my classes. He is getting a phd in phys and we started a conversation concerning the program. He thought it was a great idea. I mean we have professors who sit on the admissions committee who lecture and grade your test that you take. I can point to two professors I know of right know that are on the committee for MD/PHD. One is the coordinator for seminars in the biochem department and the other is giving a portion of the test coming up in biochem. Can you imagine getting a refernce letter from them. Think about it, they stand up in the committee meetings and read the reference letter they wrote about you!!!!
    I do however like the idea of a second bachelors, and that might be a good way to do it. Just keep an open mind about The one year masters they do work, TRUST ME.
     
  18. Marathoner

    Marathoner New Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by CoffeeCat:
    <strong>Marathoner-
    I was hoping you could answer a few more questions

    1. How has the physio program factored into your application - are there certain schools which pay special attention to it? What about the UCs? I heard something about them not counting the new grades?

    2. How competitive/difficult is it? What sort of curves are there? I know that the classes are scored against the med student's curve but is it curved with the other students? Can everyone get an A?

    3. How much debt will you be in from this year?!

    4. How time consuming is it?

    5. Do you enjoy it? Have you met cool people?

    Thanks!!</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Coffe Cat, here are the answers to your questions:

    1. It's a bit hard to see exactly how the physio program factored into my application as I ended up retaking the MCAT this past August and improved my scores, which also played a big role in my application. That said, though, between the improved MCAT score and the physio program I went from having 3 interviews last year to 8 this past year, so take that as you may. Most of the interviewers commented on the physio program, and seemed to like the fact that I had it on my application. Furthermore, most of the people who I was in the program who also reapplied had many, many offers for interviews. As far as UC schools, I did not apply to any b/c I am not from there, so can't comment.

    2. The SMP is fairly difficult as you are essentially taking the first year of medical school. The grading system is outlined on our website (www.go.to/physio) so I am not going to reiterate it, however, with the grading system it is possible for every single SMP student to obtain an "A" grade in every class.

    3. Tuition is about $22,500 and with living expenses in DC, add another $1,200 per month. Basically, it is about the same as doing an extra year of med school.

    4. Studying is rather time consuming, however, you have to think about the reasons you would be doing this program. Students are essentially trying to improve on academic credentials that they are lacking. So basically, they are being given a second chance. You can expect to spend the majority of your time studying (if you want to do well). However, if you get into med school it is definitely worth it.

    5. I really enjoyed the program and am very glad I did it. I feel so much more prepared to begin medical school because I know my abilitiy and also have already made the transition to med school study-habits. And I did meet a lot of great people. Some of my best friends are those I met in the physio program.
     

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