Jul 28, 2013
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Pre-Medical
Hi, I'm new to this site so I'm sorry if this is the wrong area to post this. I'm from Canada, and I'm in my 3rd year of undergrad right now. I've been in Canada my whole life, but I will be getting my Green Card (permanent resident status) for the US in January. If I understand correctly, this removes my status as an International applicant if I apply to the US next year, right? If so, what state would I belong to? Or would I be just be considered OOS everywhere?

Stats are listed in the title. I also have modest/strong ECs. 1-2 good leadership activities, recreational sports, good (and long-term) clinical exposure, good research experience but only a submitted abstract with respect to productivity.

As an aside, I was also wondering how to calculate my LizzyM score? I'm reading in some places that it's gpa*10 + MCAT -1 and other places it's +1.

Sorry if my situation is difficult to comprehend, so ask questions if needed.
 

DokterMom

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If so, what state would I belong to? Or would I be just be considered OOS everywhere?
Do you LIVE in the US? And if so, what state?

For educational purposes, each state has its own set of requirements that determine residency. Since you've got some time, I'd identify where you'd like to live and go to medical school, investigate what those states require, and do what you can to establish residency there. From what I hear, Texas and Florida are 'good' states for getting into medical schools, NY also. California is reputed to be the least advantageous.
 
OP
P
Jul 28, 2013
4
0
Canada
Status
Pre-Medical
Do you LIVE in the US? And if so, what state?

For educational purposes, each state has its own set of requirements that determine residency. Since you've got some time, I'd identify where you'd like to live and go to medical school, investigate what those states require, and do what you can to establish residency there. From what I hear, Texas and Florida are 'good' states for getting into medical schools, NY also. California is reputed to be the least advantageous.
I live in Canada. I'm a big city-type person, so my ideal would be schools in NYC, SF/LA/SD, Miami, Boston, Chicago. These are definitely my first choice cities to live in. I've been all around the US (including each of those cities) despite never living there. LA is definitely my first choice, but are my stats competitive enough for CA schools, as an IS, OOS, or INT?
 

gyngyn

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I live in Canada. I'm a big city-type person, so my ideal would be schools in NYC, SF/LA/SD, Miami, Boston, Chicago. These are definitely my first choice cities to live in. I've been all around the US (including each of those cities) despite never living there. LA is definitely my first choice, but are my stats competitive enough for CA schools, as an IS, OOS, or INT?
You will have a much better chance in FL, IL, OH or MI. Although TX is the best state for residence, it takes a lot more to establish yourself as a legal resident there.

2/3 of IS CA matriculants have to leave CA for medical school!
 

DokterMom

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I live in Canada. I'm a big city-type person, so my ideal would be schools in NYC, SF/LA/SD, Miami, Boston, Chicago. These are definitely my first choice cities to live in. I've been all around the US (including each of those cities) despite never living there. LA is definitely my first choice, but are my stats competitive enough for CA schools, as an IS, OOS, or INT?
I'm given to understand that there's not much IS advantage in CA, so I wouldn't 'waste my residency' on CA if you can qualify for residency in another state. And CA is highly competitive; a 3.95 / 33 is probably 'OK' but no more. Since you live in Canada, you may not be able to qualify as a resident of any state -- but it is worth checking to see. Most states require that you (or your parents, if you're a dependent) live there for 12 months before applying, plus other state-dependent stuff.

You'll also want to check and see if you'll qualify for grad-student loans, a very important consideration for most...
 
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OP
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Jul 28, 2013
4
0
Canada
Status
Pre-Medical
You will have a much better chance in FL, IL, OH or MI. Although TX is the best state for residence, it takes a lot more to establish yourself as a legal resident there.

2/3 of IS CA matriculants have to leave CA for medical school!
Wow that really is brutal, and it's a shame because I have so much family in LA.

I'm given to understand that there's not much IS advantage in CA, so I wouldn't 'waste my residency' on CA if you can qualify for residency in another state. And CA is highly competitive; a 3.95 / 33 is probably 'OK' but no more. Since you live in Canada, you may not be able to qualify as a resident of any state -- but it is worth checking to see. Most states require that you (or your parents, if you're a dependent) live there for 12 months before applying, plus other state-dependent stuff.

You'll also want to check and see if you'll qualify for grad-student loans, a very important consideration for most...
Yes I'm starting to think that I won't get residence in any state. Sucks, but thank you both for your replies - quite helpful.

Lastly then, can anyone clear up the whole LizzyM score question I had? I think that'll play a big role in deciding what schools I end up applying to.
 

gyngyn

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Wow that really is brutal, and it's a shame because I have so much family in LA.



Yes I'm starting to think that I won't get residence in any state. Sucks, but thank you both for your replies - quite helpful.

Lastly then, can anyone clear up the whole LizzyM score question I had? I think that'll play a big role in deciding what schools I end up applying to.
You might want to ask in pre-allo. They seem to understand it. Alternatively, buy the MSAR and identify schools where your stats are at the median and have a history of accepting 15% OOS applicants (or more). Then check for congruence of your history with their mission statements.
 
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LizzyM

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The score has morphed over the years as it has gotten more difficult to get into medical school in the US. It started out with the "-1" becuase you'd have a reasonable shot even if your stats were slightly below the stats for a specific school. As things have gotten more difficult, a "+1" adjustment has been recommended.
 
OP
P
Jul 28, 2013
4
0
Canada
Status
Pre-Medical
The score has morphed over the years as it has gotten more difficult to get into medical school in the US. It started out with the "-1" becuase you'd have a reasonable shot even if your stats were slightly below the stats for a specific school. As things have gotten more difficult, a "+1" adjustment has been recommended.
Sorry just to clarify - you're referring to calculating the school's score with "-1" in the early days, and "+1" nowadays, correct? Thanks for the reply, I don't frequent here much, but I assumed you were an element of folklore. Was quite surprised to see you answer me haha
 

LizzyM

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Sorry just to clarify - you're referring to calculating the school's score with "-1" in the early days, and "+1" nowadays, correct? Thanks for the reply, I don't frequent here much, but I assumed you were an element of folklore. Was quite surprised to see you answer me haha
An element of folklore? ? Next you will be telling me that there is no Santa Claus.
Yes, you add 1 to the school's score before making the comparison with your own score so you are favoring schools where your stats are just a bit better than the school's average.