manutdfan

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Hi, I am wondering if there are any 4 year med programs in the UK/Europe or Australia for students with a undergrad degree? I know most programs are 6 years straight out of HS but are there any 4 year ones?

thanks in advance
 

DrYoda

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Some of the ex-eastern-bloc countries have a 4yr med degree set up for the purpose of training Americans to take the USMLE and practice in the US. I belive the more popular ones are located in The Czech Republic and Poland.
 

Dr.Millisevert

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Hi, I am wondering if there are any 4 year med programs in the UK/Europe or Australia for students with a undergrad degree? I know most programs are 6 years straight out of HS but are there any 4 year ones?

thanks in advance
Yes there are lots of them. However, getting into medical school in the UK or Australia isn't really any easier than getting into med school in the US. So, be forwarned.

(I don't know about eastern europe... they may have programs that are "easier" to get into)



All of these medical schools have 4-year "graduate-entry" positions for students who already hold a bachelors degree. They are all excellent medical schools. (Be sure to check with each individual university for details.. as each program may have specific course pre-reqs and requisite exams. i.e. MCAT, UMAT, BMAT, GAMSAT, etc)

UK
Oxford
Cambridge
University of Warwick
Swansea University
Birmingham
Bristol
Leicester
Newcastle
Nottingham
Queen Mary
St George's

Australia
Sydney University
Melbourne University
Flinders University
Australian National University
University of Queensland
Bond University (4.5 years)
Deakin University
Griffith University
Monash University
The University of Notre Dame
University of Western Australia (4.5 years)
University of Wollongong

Ireland
(I think all these schools have 4 year programs)
Trinity College Dublin (4.5 years)
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
University College Dublin
National University of Ireland, Galway
University College Cork

New Zealand
Auckland University (5 years)
Otago University (5 years)

:thumbup:
 
Last edited:
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M

manutdfan

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Yes there are lots of them. However, getting into medical school in the UK or Australia isn't really any easier than getting into med school in the US. So, be forwarned.

(I don't know about eastern europe... they may have programs that are "easier" to get into)



All of these medical schools have 4-year "graduate-entry" positions for students who already hold a bachelors degree. They are all excellent medical schools. (Be sure to check with each individual university for details.. as each program may have specific course pre-reqs and requisite exams. i.e. MCAT, UMAT, GAMSAT, etc)

UK
Oxford
Cambridge
University of Warwick
Swansea University
Birmingham
Bristol
Leicester
Newcastle
Nottingham
Queen Mary
St George's

Australia
Sydney University
Melbourne University
Flinders University
Australian National University
University of Queensland
Bond University (4.5 years)
Deakin University
Griffith University
Monash University
The University of Notre Dame
University of Western Australia (4.5 years)
University of Wollongong

Ireland
(I think all these schools have 4 year programs)
Trinity College Dublin (4.5 years)
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
University College Dublin
National University of Ireland, Galway
University College Cork

New Zealand
Auckland University (5 years)
Otago University (5 years)

:thumbup:
thanks for the reply!

now my next question is then which of these schools accept international students? I'm from Pakistan

:)
 

Dr.Millisevert

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thanks for the reply!

now my next question is then which of these schools accept international students? I'm from Pakistan

:)
Pretty much all of them I think. How many international students each school takes and how many people are applying for those few spots is another question. Sorry, I don't have the answer for that one. You will have to do some work yourself now and start contacting the schools you are interested in and asking them.

Good luck
 
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M

manutdfan

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thanks for your reply, your list was very helpful

so are all these programs comparable to the 4 year MD programs in the US?

how does the whole specialization/residency program work after graduation in the UK and Australia?
 

Dr.Millisevert

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1) so are all these programs comparable to the 4 year MD programs in the US?

2) how does the whole specialization/residency program work after graduation in the UK and Australia?
1) Yes. Most of these schools offer some form of the " Bachelor of Medicine/Surgery " degree (MBBS, MB BChir, BM BCh, MB BCh, MB ChB, BM BS, MDCM, BMed, etc.) All of these are 100% equal to a US-MD degree. If you have one of these and you are licensed in the US, every US state medical board even allows you to use the title "MD" if you so wish.

General information on (Medical school).

2) Sorry I can't help you with information regarding training in the UK. You may want to ask this in the UK forum. (I can tell you however that there has been a huge increase in the number of UK medical graduates attempting to move to Aus or NZ to complete their specialty training in the past 5-10 years)

In Australia and New Zealand however, you are required to do a 1-year general internship year in order to obtain your medical license. Then specialization in Australia is pretty similar to Canada. After you finish your program you are then eligible to become a Fellow of the Royal College of (such and such specialty). (This is equal to becoming "Board certified" in the US)

By the way.. those doing specialty training (residents/registrars) in Australia get paid on average almost double what they do in the US. :thumbup:

Here are some random examples of graduates working in the US:
Sydney grad

Cambridge grad

Trinity grad

Flinders grad

(the list goes on and on)

There are lots of US doctors trying to move to Australia to work now because in many fields the salaries are better there than the US now.

You should think about where you want to work long term too when you apply to medical schools. If you really want to stay in the United States.. you should also consider US-DO programs. If you want more options to work elswhere than you're probably better off with one of the programs from the list above.

Do some more searches.. both on google and on SDN. Most of these questions have been asked and answered many times before.

Good luck
 
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daniellema13

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1) Yes. Most of these schools offer some form of the " Bachelor of Medicine/Surgery " degree (MBBS, MB BChir, BM BCh, MB BCh, MB ChB, BM BS, MDCM, BMed, etc.) All of these are 100% equal to a US-MD degree. If you have one of these and you are licensed in the US, every US state medical board even allows you to use the title "MD" if you so wish.

General information on (Medical school).

2) Sorry I can't help you with information regarding training in the UK. You may want to ask this in the UK forum. (I can tell you that there has been a huge increase in the number of UK medical graduates attempting to move to Aus or NZ to complete their specialty training in the past 5-10 years)

In Australia and New Zealand however, you are required to do a 1-year general internship year in order to obtain your medical license. Then specialization in Australia is pretty similar to Canada. After you finish your program you are then eligible to become a Fellow of the Royal College of (such and such specialty). (This is equal to becoming "Board certified" in the US)

By the way.. those doing specialty training (residents/registrars) in Australia get paid on average almost double what they do in the US. :thumbup:

Here are some random examples of graduates working in the US:
Sydney grad

Cambridge grad

Trinity grad

Flinders grad

(the list goes on and on)

There are lots of US doctors trying to move to Australia to work now because in many fields the salaries are better there than the US now.

You should think about where you want to work long term too when you apply to medical schools. If you really want to stay in the United States.. you should also consider US-DO programs. If you want more options to work elswhere than you're probably better off with one of the programs from the list above.
This is important. If you want to work long term in the US you are MUCH better off going to medical school here. It is far more difficult for foreign grads to get US residency spots, and if you do your residency training somewhere else you almost always have to repeat residency in the US to practice here. If you have a particular country in mind that you are interested in working in, then that is the first place i would be looking into medical schools. Also keep in mind cost as i'm not sure how those countries handle aid for foreign students. Good luck :luck:
 

Dr.Millisevert

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This is important. If you want to work long term in the US you are MUCH better off going to medical school here. It is far more difficult for foreign grads to get US residency spots, and if you do your residency training somewhere else you almost always have to repeat residency in the US to practice here. If you have a particular country in mind that you are interested in working in, then that is the first place i would be looking into medical schools. Also keep in mind cost as i'm not sure how those countries handle aid for foreign students. Good luck :luck:
Agreed!

Most everyone who attends medical school overseas (where ever) almost always obtains student loans in their home country. VERY VERY rarely will any University or Bank give you a student loan if you are not a permanant resident or citizen of that country.

i.e.: if you are a Canadian going to medical school in New Zealand, you won't be able to get a student loan from the NZ goverment or a NZ bank. You will have to get your loans from the Canadian gov and Canadian banks.

:thumbup: