May 24, 2016
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Hello everyone! I think this is my first posting in a long time, so please excuse if this is in the wrong place.

I recently graduated from UT Austin (well, one online class left, will be finished in a week or two, but basically graduated). I've received an offer from a job in Washington D.C. at a consulting firm, and I've also garnered acceptance to the Biomedical Science Policy and Advocacy program at Georgetown Univ (https://sciencepolicy.georgetown.edu). This is only a year program (can be up to 3 years), and it will cost $50K for just tuition.

My GPA when calculated with both undergrad universities I attended, comes out to a 3.47. If we calculate just my science GPA, I'm very certain it is higher, and for many Texas schools, since there is no +/-, it will be higher still (but not too much). I just took my MCAT yesterday, and while I felt good, it's most likely that I'll have to retake it while in D.C.

Now my predicament is this...

The main reason's I applied to the masters program is because of course I have an interest in policy, but also I want to boost my GPA for admissions purposes. Furthermore, if I decide to attend, I won't be taking full course loads, just about 3-4 classes a semester, where I'll finish the program as a part-time student in about two years (just before Fall 2018). Graduating from Georgetown would look very nice on the resume, and open potential career paths.

On the other hand, I could just work at my company, while also working as a scribe, and doing additional shadowing and volunteering, while studying for the MCAT, and getting a really good score on it. This would save me $50,000, and if I still want a masters, I could do a joint MPH, MD program.

So assuming that I make a decent score on the MCAT (at least 93rd percentile), which option would benefit me more? Currently I'm leaning towards just working and grinding out a great score, with other activities supplementing my application (shadowing/volunteering/scribing).

Please let me know any and all thoughts!

Thanks!
 

gyngyn

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Master's grades are not included in the AMCAS undergraduate gpa calculation (you should check to make sure this is true for TDMSAS). Therefore, even all "A's" in a masters has no effect on your gpa.
Texas puts more emphasis on undergrad gpa than most states.
I would would not recommend a re-take if the first MCAT is consistent with success.
 
OP
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May 24, 2016
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Pre-Medical
Thanks for your reply! So actually, TMDSAS calculated an overall GPA, an overall BCPM GPA, an overall undegrad GPA, an overall undergrad BCPM GPA, an overall non-BCPM GPA, and overall, BCPM, and non-BCPM graduate GPA.
 

gyngyn

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Thanks for your reply! So actually, TMDSAS calculated an overall GPA, an overall BCPM GPA, an overall undegrad GPA, an overall undergrad BCPM GPA, an overall non-BCPM GPA, and overall, BCPM, and non-BCPM graduate GPA.
Then I would conclude that the perception of your undergrad gpa will not be affected by Master's degree grades, in the same manner as for AMCAS.
 

DokterMom

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Assuming you go on to receive an MD, your masters from Georgetown will be a minor footnote that even you will often omit. So save your $50K and enjoy your consulting gig.
 
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OP
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May 24, 2016
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Okay, well thank you for all the responses, I don't think I will be attending Georgetown after all!