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estradiol9

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it's a passage based question so I would have to write out the whole passage here but for those of you who have the test, can someone can explain the logic behind the correct answer?

it's from the BS section, passage V, last question
 

MedPR

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Type out the question and the answer choices. I might still remember the passage well enough.
 

rjosh33

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it's a passage based question so I would have to write out the whole passage here but for those of you who have the test, can someone can explain the logic behind the correct answer?

it's from the BS section, passage V, last question

I'm assuming you mean question #128. If not, please clarify.

So, normally, when intact endothelial cells are exposed to acetylcholine, they release Nitric Oxide (NO), which thus causes the blood vessels to relax, or dilate. However, if the production of NO was interrupted (by, say, an inhibitor of the enzyme that synthesizes it), then it would not be able to produce its vasodilating effects.

Well, this is exactly what the situation is describing. By introducing a saturating concentration of the inhibitor L-NMMA (in the text beneath the graphs L-NMMA is stated to be an inhibitor of NO synthase), NO is prevented from being synthesized. Thus, the vessels would not be able to relax as they normally would, and as a result the tension of the aortic ring would increase.
 
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estradiol9

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I'm assuming you mean question #128. If not, please clarify.

So, normally, when intact endothelial cells are exposed to acetylcholine, they release Nitric Oxide (NO), which thus causes the blood vessels to relax, or dilate. However, if the production of NO was interrupted (by, say, an inhibitor of the enzyme that synthesizes it), then it would not be able to produce its vasodilating effects.

Well, this is exactly what the situation is describing. By introducing a saturating concentration of the inhibitor L-NMMA (in the text beneath the graphs L-NMMA is stated to be an inhibitor of NO synthase), NO is prevented from being synthesized. Thus, the vessels would not be able to relax as they normally would, and as a result the tension of the aortic ring would increase.

I get it now, thanks!
 
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