dddizz

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I read somewhere on this site that there are just about the same number of applicants as their are seats available for podiatry school.

does anyone know if there is any truth to this?

That would basically mean as long as you apply to all 9 schools you would have a really good chance at being accepted to atleast 1. (in theory)
 

MaxillofacialMN

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I read somewhere on this site that there are just about the same number of applicants as their are seats available for podiatry school.

does anyone know if there is any truth to this?

That would basically mean as long as you apply to all 9 schools you would have a really good chance at being accepted to atleast 1. (in theory)

Compare these numbers: http://www.aacpm.org/html/statistics/PDFs/AppStats/Historical_TRENDS.pdf

With these numbers: http://www.aacpm.org/html/statistics/PDFs/MatrStats/11-12_Total_Enroll_CLASS.pdf

So... Not the same number.

Edit: The first link doesn't seem to direct you to the right page, but once you are at the AACPM site, go to statistics, then drop down menu to applicant stats.
 
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dddizz

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Compare these numbers: http://www.aacpm.org/html/statistics/PDFs/AppStats/Historical_TRENDS.pdf

With these numbers: http://www.aacpm.org/html/statistics/PDFs/MatrStats/11-12_Total_Enroll_CLASS.pdf

So... Not the same number.

Edit: The first link doesn't seem to direct you to the right page, but once you are at the AACPM site, go to statistics, then drop down menu to applicant stats.
Thanks, very useful data.

Do podiatry schools take the applicants ethnicity into consideration when determining accpetance? Similar to how some argue that med/dental schools accept less qualified URM's.
 
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Approximately half of the applicants are accepted.
 

dddizz

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Approximately half of the applicants are accepted.
from aacpm.org

Total applicants in 2010: 867

Total matriculants in 2010: 622

So based off of these numbers I think about 72% of those who apply are accepted.
 

MaxillofacialMN

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Thanks, very useful data.

Do podiatry schools take the applicants ethnicity into consideration when determining accpetance? Similar to how some argue that med/dental schools accept less qualified URM's.
Probably not. The rates for Pod school acceptedance of URM is actually higher than the dental schools and medical schools rates. Also, podiatry is really trying to boost the MCAT and GPA standards to make the field more competitive so I doubt they are concerned with serving racially under-served groups - realistically all racial groups in the USA is under-served by podiatrists, so I don't think they do that all too much.
 

EK18

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Also, bear in mind not everyone applies to every school. CSPM got 387 Apps for the Fall 2011 entering class out of the (I'm guessing) approximately 850-900 apps that were sent out. It doesn't matter if you apply to one school or all nine, you get factored into the AACPMAS application total.

So, I wouldn't say that applying to all the schools "guarantees" you a spot, but it certainly won't hurt your chances.
 

heybrother

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MaxillofacialMN

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Heybro, it's the websites!! I'm telling you!! Haha

70 seems a bit high as these only come from Temple and NYCPM, right? I can't imagine there are that many matriculated with those tests.... Who knows though

Only a slightly related note: I wonder what the avg DAT score for admissions is... On the one hand you'd think they'd be more selective, but on the other hand, the people who are applying with DATs are d-school rejects, so......
 

iVTECdailyy

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Heybro, it's the websites!! I'm telling you!! Haha

70 seems a bit high as these only come from Temple and NYCPM, right? I can't imagine there are that many matriculated with those tests.... Who knows though

Only a slightly related note: I wonder what the avg DAT score for admissions is... On the one hand you'd think they'd be more selective, but on the other hand, the people who are applying with DATs are d-school rejects, so......
I believe they factor in "your desire for podiatry over dentistry" just as much as your DAT score. And not all DAT takers are dental school rejects. Many DAT takers are ones who have been exposed to podiatry later than others.
 
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dyk343

I believe they factor in "your desire for podiatry over dentistry" just as much as your DAT score. And not all DAT takers are dental school rejects. Many DAT takers are ones who have been exposed to podiatry later than others.
DAT = dental school. It's such an embarrassing part of our profession.

Podiatry is such an interesting profession. I don't understand why the applicant numbers are so low. Maybe its because schools are so desperate to get applicants (DAT).
 

Podophile

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DAT = dental school. It's such an embarrassing part of our profession.

Podiatry is such an interesting profession. I don't understand why the applicant numbers are so low. Maybe its because schools are so desperate to get applicants (DAT).
It's the stigma of having a "foot fetish", the limited scope of practice and not being a "real" doctor. Those alone are enough to scare many qualified applicants away.

More importantly it's the career certainty. The MD/DO allow a lot of flexibility when choosing a specialty/career; the DPM does not. How many college juniors know for certain exactly what they want to do professionally for the rest of their life? Some do, but many may just know they want to do something medical. That's where MD/DO is a safer alternative. Although I totally agree, podiatry is making leaps and bounds and will only continue to improve.

I say we limit the number of matriculants to half of what it currently is and produce as many top students, residents and doctors as possible. Schools scrambling to fill seats and make money is killing us.
 

EK18

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Take a look at the following links for 2010. You'll notice that 622 matriculants are listed for 2010 in the GPA sheet, but only 546 matriculants are listed for MCAT. So question: Can we assume that this means that 76 individuals matriculated based on either their DAT or GRE?
http://www.aacpm.org/html/statistics/PDFs/MatrStats/Matriculant_GPA.pdf
http://www.aacpm.org/html/statistics/PDFs/MatrStats/Matriculant_MCAT.pdf

Matriculant statistics don't appear to be improving.
I think you mixed it up. There are 622 total matriculants for 2010 and 505 of those matriculated with an MCAT, not 546 (546 was 2011).

This means that 117 people were accepted to NYCPM or TUSPM with a DAT/GRE score. Those two schools together accept around ~200 students so I suppose it seems possible.
 
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MaxillofacialMN

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I say we limit the number of matriculants to half of what it currently is and produce as many top students, residents and doctors as possible. Schools scrambling to fill seats and make money is killing us.
Do you know how many years it would take for that to make a difference in the field? Minimally 20 for sure.

Then, if you cut seats in half, the applicant pool would probably diminish as well, so you wouldn't necessarily increase stats all that much anyways. Also, cutting the number of pods in the field by 50% would make the profession even less visible. Our cases are already being farmed out to nurses, orthopods, etc, due to a shortage of Podiatric providers, this would embarrass the profession more.

As much as I disagree that everyone needs a 3 year surgical residency, I think that, coupled with the terrible attrition rates will actually help the Podiatric profession - you'll produce a standardized field of podiatrists that will know what they're doing and you won't hear people complaining about "all the botched surgeries I've heard about from a pod," anymore.

Also, I think our current stats are slightly misleading, and I'll use myself as an example. (this probably applies to far less than 50% of the applicant pool, but nevertheless) Realistically, my stats are not as high as they could be if I were pursuing a degree in medicine/dentistry. I know the GPA and MCAT I need, and I've shot for about a standard deviation above that, which is not quite on par with medical schools. So whenever I'm studying for a test, and I'm tired, the honest truth is, my excuse is: "I'm trying for pod school, I'm happy with the B-grade I will probably get on this test, and I'll go to sleep. If I KNEW I needed a higher grade, I'd put on a pot of coffee and get the A. The same is true with my MCAT, I take that in like 5 days. I've been happy with my AAMC practice tests, and yet I've only studied maybe ~30 hours total. If I were attempting med school, I wouldn't be happy with my 29 AAMC average and I'd study much harder to get well into the thirties. Call me lazy, or whatever you want, but why perfect areas of my life I don't deem important if I can be doing other things I enjoy? Anyways, there is probably a portion of applicants (10-30%?) that are probably at least somewhat like me, that know what pod schools admissions are, and so they don't strive for a 3.8, 35 when a 3.6, 29 will do.
 

SuperFeisty

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Also, I think our current stats are slightly misleading, and I'll use myself as an example. (this probably applies to far less than 50% of the applicant pool, but nevertheless) Realistically, my stats are not as high as they could be if I were pursuing a degree in medicine/dentistry. I know the GPA and MCAT I need, and I've shot for about a standard deviation above that, which is not quite on par with medical schools. So whenever I'm studying for a test, and I'm tired, the honest truth is, my excuse is: "I'm trying for pod school, I'm happy with the B-grade I will probably get on this test, and I'll go to sleep. If I KNEW I needed a higher grade, I'd put on a pot of coffee and get the A. The same is true with my MCAT, I take that in like 5 days. I've been happy with my AAMC practice tests, and yet I've only studied maybe ~30 hours total. If I were attempting med school, I wouldn't be happy with my 29 AAMC average and I'd study much harder to get well into the thirties. Call me lazy, or whatever you want, but why perfect areas of my life I don't deem important if I can be doing other things I enjoy? Anyways, there is probably a portion of applicants (10-30%?) that are probably at least somewhat like me, that know what pod schools admissions are, and so they don't strive for a 3.8, 35 when a 3.6, 29 will do.
The entrance requirements may be easier, but I'm pretty sure if you're averaging a B- in your classes at pod school, it will be much more difficult to get the residency you want. While the requirements may be more lax than med school, I would doubt that you could goof off through school. Having the chance to be a podiatrist is not something to be taken lightly. Sometimes people forget just how lucky they are for these opportunities.
 

dtrack22

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This means that 117 people were accepted to NYCPM or TUSPM with a DAT/GRE score. Those two schools together accept around ~200 students so I suppose it seems possible.
Most of those folks without an MCAT score are probably GRE/DAT takers, but you also have individuals who were accepted before they took the MCAT. The school will say something like "we're offering you this acceptance and we would like to see you score a 24 on your MCAT". Problem is, they've offered you an acceptance. There is nothing conditional about it. So you pay your seat deposit, fill out all of the necessary paperwork, never take the MCAT, and then matriculated because the school really doesn't care. You'll find MCAT-less students at just about every program. And it wasn't because they have some other entrance exam in its place.
 

MaxillofacialMN

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The entrance requirements may be easier, but I'm pretty sure if you're averaging a B- in your classes at pod school, it will be much more difficult to get the residency you want. While the requirements may be more lax than med school, I would doubt that you could goof off through school. Having the chance to be a podiatrist is not something to be taken lightly. Sometimes people forget just how lucky they are for these opportunities.
I'm not too sure what you're getting at, but I completely understand that undergrad and pod school are entirely different beasts. With that being said, my undergrad GPA and MCAT scores will have no effect on my ability to get a residency.
 

MaxillofacialMN

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Most of those folks without an MCAT score are probably GRE/DAT takers, but you also have individuals who were accepted before they took the MCAT. The school will say something like "we're offering you this acceptance and we would like to see you score a 24 on your MCAT". Problem is, they've offered you an acceptance. There is nothing conditional about it. So you pay your seat deposit, fill out all of the necessary paperwork, never take the MCAT, and then matriculated because the school really doesn't care. You'll find MCAT-less students at just about every program. And it wasn't because they have some other entrance exam in its place.
Wow, that's really telling.... Sort of makes me want to skip my test on Thursday.... Or at least the writing part... Haha
 
D

dyk343

Wow, that's really telling.... Sort of makes me want to skip my test on Thursday.... Or at least the writing part... Haha
Read the exam krackers writing book.Its an easy read and really helps get a good writing score (not that it matters...)
 
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or you could see how many times you slip the word fellatio or coitus into your essays and say screw the writing score it is honestly insignificant.

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MaxillofacialMN

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or you could see how many times you slip the word fellatio or coitus into your essays and say screw the writing score it is honestly insignificant.

Sent from my SPH-D600 using SDN Mobile
Hmmm that might be a bit too ballsy, I'll see how I'm feeling after PS and VR though...
 
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dyk343

1st paragraph tell them what you are going to say (summarize)

body - retell them what you said w more detail and provide evidence for and against your argument. Show why the evidence for your argument is greater than evidence against your argument.

last paragraph retell them what you just said (summarize)

Don't worry about big flashy words. Just be clear, concise, and watch grammar. That formula will get you a good score.

Good luck.
 
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dyk343

It's the stigma of having a "foot fetish", the limited scope of practice and not being a "real" doctor. Those alone are enough to scare many qualified applicants away.

More importantly it's the career certainty. The MD/DO allow a lot of flexibility when choosing a specialty/career; the DPM does not. How many college juniors know for certain exactly what they want to do professionally for the rest of their life? Some do, but many may just know they want to do something medical. That's where MD/DO is a safer alternative. Although I totally agree, podiatry is making leaps and bounds and will only continue to improve.

I say we limit the number of matriculants to half of what it currently is and produce as many top students, residents and doctors as possible. Schools scrambling to fill seats and make money is killing us.
What about dental school? They specialize early and have decent matriculation statistics.

I'm not out to disprove you, im just still trying to figure out why pod school application numbers are so low. The best thing I can come up with is the stigma that its easy to get into so people don't want to apply for prestige issues.

...or the foot fetish thing.
 
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I have to say that as a pre-pod I am a bit annoyed with the "why do you want to be a podiatrist? Do you have a foot-fetish?" Of course I then say it is deeper than that but then promptly ask to touch their feet. No, thats not true haha. I dont think it is the foot-fetish thing as it is that people for one reason or another think that feet are repulsive. While volunteering at a large hospital I asked a trauma surgeon what he thought about podiatry and he said: "It is a good career if you like feet. I could not work with feet, feet are gross." This was after he told me about repairing hearts with suture that spray blood with each beat. Personally, I do not care that more people are not trying to get into school, that leaves more room and scholarship money for me. I agree with max, one of the reasons I liked podiatry is the fact that it is not as tough to get in. I take comfort in knowing that I will get into school, most likely at one I want to be at. But I also look forward to the challenge of school. It happens every where, acceptance rates and matriculation does not equal graduation. I say let us in, take our money, as long as we know what we are getting into. This could prove to be a statement I regret in the next few years but if anything I think they should make the schooling harder. But only if a residency shortage arises and become more strict about failing courses while in school and things of that nature. Other than that, let em come. Take us all whom prove to be motivated and ready for the challenge. If we do not all get degrees, so be it. I know I will...
 

MaxillofacialMN

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I have to say that as a pre-pod I am a bit annoyed with the "why do you want to be a podiatrist? Do you have a foot-fetish?" Of course I then say it is deeper than that but then promptly ask to touch their feet. No, thats not true haha. I dont think it is the foot-fetish thing as it is that people for one reason or another think that feet are repulsive. While volunteering at a large hospital I asked a trauma surgeon what he thought about podiatry and he said: "It is a good career if you like feet. I could not work with feet, feet are gross." This was after he told me about repairing hearts with suture that spray blood with each beat. Personally, I do not care that more people are not trying to get into school, that leaves more room and scholarship money for me. I agree with max, one of the reasons I liked podiatry is the fact that it is not as tough to get in. I take comfort in knowing that I will get into school, most likely at one I want to be at. But I also look forward to the challenge of school. It happens every where, acceptance rates and matriculation does not equal graduation. I say let us in, take our money, as long as we know what we are getting into. This could prove to be a statement I regret in the next few years but if anything I think they should make the schooling harder. But only if a residency shortage arises and become more strict about failing courses while in school and things of that nature. Other than that, let em come. Take us all whom prove to be motivated and ready for the challenge. If we do not all get degrees, so be it. I know I will...

Good post!!
 
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I have to say that as a pre-pod I am a bit annoyed with the "why do you want to be a podiatrist? Do you have a foot-fetish?"
I would choose podiatry for the sports medicine/trauma surgery/bunion surgery/diabetic foot surgery/pain management aspect of it
 
Jun 17, 2012
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slightly off topic, but I was reading through the Podiatric Medicine and New York and Florida seems to have the most room for incoming students for the year of 2012. I have been shadowing a podiatrist for a while and she seems to have a very negative view of the health care system in Florida, do you believe that it has to do with the admission rates?

Also with podiatry, does it matter which school you go to in terms of scope of practice after you earn your DPM degree? Do you know where I would be able to find that information?

thank you!
 
Jun 17, 2012
314
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slightly off topic, but I was reading through the Podiatric Medicine and New York and Florida seems to have the most room for incoming students for the year of 2012. I have been shadowing a podiatrist for a while and she seems to have a very negative view of the health care system in Florida, do you believe that it has to do with the admission rates?

Also with podiatry, does it matter which school you go to in terms of scope of practice after you earn your DPM degree? Do you know where I would be able to find that information?

thank you!
 

MaxillofacialMN

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slightly off topic, but I was reading through the Podiatric Medicine and New York and Florida seems to have the most room for incoming students for the year of 2012. I have been shadowing a podiatrist for a while and she seems to have a very negative view of the health care system in Florida, do you believe that it has to do with the admission rates?

Also with podiatry, does it matter which school you go to in terms of scope of practice after you earn your DPM degree? Do you know where I would be able to find that information?

thank you!
Uh... I'll attempt to answer this.

The biggest class sizes don't affect admission rates, and the healthcare system is not at all related to the quality or number of pods Barry churns out - to be honest, I can't even fathom how you made that connection...

Just like with all other professional programs, a podiatrist is a podiatrist. So, the school does not grant different scopes of practice - states do that.

I'm confused how you've shadowed a pod for "a while" yet you seem to be very misinformed about a large variety of things...
 
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oh okay I actually had no idea.
and my definition of "a while" is 3 weeks... whoops.
i decided pretty late in my undergrad career that i wanted to pursue this career.
any advice that you can give would be appreciated thank!
 

willingdoc

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I think application numbers are so low because honestly, podiatry school is a secret. When I was shadowing various podiatrists the patients and the general public thought that the podiatrists were just MD's who chose to specialize in podiatry. In every university you'll find a premed club or a predental club but rarely a pre podiatry club. I even know of some MD students who have never heard of podiatry school. Sure some people are weirded out by feet, but I believe that podiatry truly is one of the best kept secrets in medicine.
 
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NY is just "jelly" (as the kids say) that FL has surpassed her as our Nation's 3rd Largest State in population.

But to answer your question, I agree with what MaxilloFacialMN said. I am not sure your connection at all or why you think FL has a bad health care system. Typically people who dislike FL's system argue that we have too many seniors. While it is true that FL has a lot of seniors, they generally have good insurance (the ones who can't afford to move here likely have more limited policies). Not to rag on PA/TUSPM, but as Rick Santorum says, "All the rich Seniors of PA left for Florida or Arizona. The poor ones stayed." Florida also has one of the best Scopes of Practice (in my opinion, the Best) of all the States in our Union. Like any other state though with a Pod school, there is saturation. But keep in mind that Barry is the only school in the South, you can certainly journey throughout Dixie for your residency.
oh okay I see, thanks for the insight.
and Sabin, I see that you're in Barry's class of 2015.
can you tell me a little bit about your experiences at the University so far?
- thanks!
 

Sabin

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oh okay I see, thanks for the insight.
and Sabin, I see that you're in Barry's class of 2015.
can you tell me a little bit about your experiences at the University so far?
- thanks!
I think Barry provides a lot of opportunity to it's students (which is I why I chose Barry).

In terms of Pod-education, I have friends at 3 of the other 8 schools to compare with. I think all schools have strengths and weaknesses, but I am pleased with Barry. I also think it that has decent options for student research.

Feel free to PM me if you have any questions.
 
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