Avery07

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Has anyone ever encountered Graham's Law or the Van der waals equation in relation to gas laws on the DAT?

I'm assuming we will not be tested over such complex equations. I can see Graham's law possibly occurring but definitely not the van der waals equation.

If anything I see concepts being tested on such as effusion for Graham's law and real gases vs ideal gases for van der waals.

Anyone have experience with encountering these laws on the DAT?

I'm also worried about the kinetic molecular theory of gases equation. It's easy to understand the concepts but this would be a difficult equation to spit back up and comprehend on the DAT.

Boyle's, Charles', Avogadro's and the combined gas law are simple and I think this is the extent of the problems we should encounter. Am I correct in that assumption?
 

UndergradGuy7

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Has anyone ever encountered Graham's Law or the Van der waals equation in relation to gas laws on the DAT?

I'm assuming we will not be tested over such complex equations. I can see Graham's law possibly occurring but definitely not the van der waals equation.

If anything I see concepts being tested on such as effusion for Graham's law and real gases vs ideal gases for van der waals.

Anyone have experience with encountering these laws on the DAT?

I'm also worried about the kinetic molecular theory of gases equation. It's easy to understand the concepts but this would be a difficult equation to spit back up and comprehend on the DAT.

Boyle's, Charles', Avogadro's and the combined gas law are simple and I think this is the extent of the problems we should encounter. Am I correct in that assumption?
I would take a guess and say no, you don't have to know the van der waal's equation of state. But know what it takes into account, what makes a gas real and use the equation. It takes into the account the volume of the gas molecules. Ideally we assume they have no volume. The van der waal's equation also takes into account the collisions of molecules.

Most importantly know that gases move away from the ideal gas law under high pressure, and low temperature.

For graham's law, do you mean his law of effusion? Thats an easy equation.

Don't know about the last equation, but I wouldn't worry about it. I have not seen it in kaplan, acs gen chem books. I didn't do destroyer yet, so can't comment.
 

saDDS

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Nothing in destroyer as far as I can remember and defiantly nothing on my DAT. Stick to the basics.
 

Avery07

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By Graham's law, I did mean the Law of Effusion. I've seen this in Kaplan so I'll study it good. The material I was studying presented it in a difficult context but Kaplan's take on it is quite simple so I'm not quite so worried anymore.