medhopeful82

2+ Year Member
Jun 11, 2015
237
107
Status
Medical Student
I currently work at a biopharmaceutical manufacturing company and I have been here for about a year and gotten two promotions in that time. They know I am applying to medical school and completely understand that. However, I recently got contacted by a recruiter who set up an interview for me at a very prestigious research hospital and turns out I got the job! The PI I interviewed with made a point to say she really wants someone who will stay for at least 3 years.. Should I feel guilty if I take this job knowing I might be leaving for medical school in about a year? I haven't received any II yet and if, by chance, I don't get in to medical school I would much rather have this new job with a lot more potential than my current job. I just really don't want to make a bad impression on this research hospital in the area (by leaving after 1 year), because I would ideally do some rotations or even residency there after medical school.
 

futuremdforme

5+ Year Member
May 12, 2013
883
674
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Non-Student
They would still let you go if they didn't have work for you after a year therefore it's okay to accept the job and plan to leave if you get in. You should do what is best for your career while maintaining a good relationship with them if you get into MS. (And I hope you do.)
 
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Affiche

5+ Year Member
Apr 20, 2014
2,440
5,161
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Medical Student
Yes you should, you deceived them.
It doesn't sound like she deceived anyone. Her current employer knows that she's planning to apply to medical school, and it would be odd to mention in an interview that she's applying when she hasn't started the application process yet and admission is far from guaranteed. It would basically be asking the interviewer not to consider her, and she should have a plan B while applying.

@medhopeful82 I am currently applying as a non-traditional student so I'll tell you how I handled switching jobs before my application cycle. First, before you accept the offer, make clear that you are planning to apply to medical school in 1-2 years and ask about flexibility for traveling for interviews. This is your priority. If they will not accommodate your interviewing, I would not accept the position as long as you are able to stay where you currently are (ie employed lol). If they will accommodate your interview schedule, discuss with them a timeline for possible leaving date. Make sure that you are clear that if you do not get accepted, you will be staying for 3+ years. If you are accepted, how much notice will they need? How much commitment do they need from you for training someone else? Make sure this is all clear before you accept and you should be good. In my experience, once you have the job employers are much more willing to negotiate lol.
 

NonTrad16

2+ Year Member
Feb 2, 2015
893
967
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Medical Student
If you didn't get in this year, would you be willing to stick it out the full three years (likely need to retake the MCAT)? If you do not see yourself staying the full time in any scenario (as desired by the lab) I would be upfront about your plans if they ask, and certainly before you accept a job. You have more flexibility as an employee than as an applicant, but really... It seems wrong to accept a job knowing full well you won't stay a duration requested by the lab. It's likely funded by a grant, so budgeting is critical and they don't take kindly to surprises.

How I see it: you have a job that will provide for you and allow you to pursue medical school without issue. This seems good for you. If you didn't accept the new job, someone else can and will happily take it, hopefully for the full time. This is good for the other employee and the lab PI. If you accept the job you could easily be back here in 6 months talking about how anxious you feel about quitting a job you just got, on a tightly funded few year project. This will make you and the PI anxious, and then they have to scramble for a 1-2 year fill, retrain, etc. If you were the boss, this is a crappy scenario, and the reason they are clear about wanting a 3 year commitment. All that's gained from this is a better plan b for you at the expense of someone else (if you aren't making your plans clear).
 
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medhopeful82

2+ Year Member
Jun 11, 2015
237
107
Status
Medical Student
Thanks for the advice! I am definitely not trying to be deceiving. I will let the PI know of my plans and give her the option of where to go from there. The grant this lab has if for 10 years. The only reason she said 3 years is because she has had several replacements leave after short periods (all three apparently met surgeons at the hospital and got married an quit lol) and she said she is ready for some stability, which is understandable!
 

NotASerialKiller

2+ Year Member
Jul 7, 2015
1,457
6,866
Status
Medical Student
Thanks for the advice! I am definitely not trying to be deceiving. I will let the PI know of my plans and give her the option of where to go from there. The grant this lab has if for 10 years. The only reason she said 3 years is because she has had several replacements leave after short periods (all three apparently met surgeons at the hospital and got married an quit lol) and she said she is ready for some stability, which is understandable!
Maybe I misunderstood the story. Isn't the person who said they wanted a 3-year commitment NOT aware that you're applying to med school this year? It sounded like the people at your current position are, but this new PI has no idea. If that's the case, and they said they wanted 3 years, and you know you're hoping to leave after 1 and did not at any point mention that, then yes you are deceiving them. I'm not saying it's the most awful thing in the world, but if they end up angry and you find that this bridge has been burned, you can't possibly be surprised.

edit: Sorry I just saw the part where you said that you WILL let this PI know of your plans. Of course that would be fine then, from your first post it really sounded like you were leaving that out on purpose.
 

akai1412

2+ Year Member
Jul 5, 2015
91
30
From what I know, if you mention going to pharm or med school, they will likely not select you. The cost of training one person is roughly 1/2 year salary of that person. It's so costly that company tends to not hire them. Good thing company never asks that question, so if I leave, I don't feel that bad. But if your PI definitely mentions that, it will feel a little bad because you kind of hid the truth of your future plan

It will feel terribly feel awkward when you suddenly ask for a series of time off for interview. It's especially difficult if there is no one else to cover for your work during time off.
 
Last edited:
Jun 1, 2015
487
647
Status
Pre-Medical
It is a job. You are an at-will employee. Don't get suckered into feeling bad about a time commitment when it isn't legally binding and doesn't affect you in any way. Do what is best for you, always.
 

Strudel19

5+ Year Member
Jul 14, 2011
511
189
Status
Pre-Medical
I've worked a strange array of manual labor and medical jobs. My policy is if I can get fired without cause, I can leave without cause. The caveats are career-related positions. I had a CRC opportunity in front of me and I knew I would only be available for a year. I told them that and they didn't hire me because of it. Why did I tell them? Because the doctors who I would have worked for are assistant professors at local medical schools and I didn't want any sticky situations - you never know.

On the other hand, I don't build bridges I don't need. if it's menial labor job (job that needs bodies to chew up and spit out) and I'm not putting it on my resume and won't be working there again, I'm not giving notice. I'm going in, making my money and leaving.
 
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medhopeful82

2+ Year Member
Jun 11, 2015
237
107
Status
Medical Student
@Strudel19 I agree with you! I think that is why I was worried about this position -- I don't want to burn any bridges with this research hospital!