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an unanswered question

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by realruby2000, Feb 20, 2002.

  1. realruby2000

    realruby2000 Senior Member
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    nobody's really answered the question about a
    DO EM residency. How much of a disadavantage is it by going into an AOA EM program rather than an allopathic one?? Do you have trouble getting a job afterwards? Is the comphensation less? what are the major drawbacks?
     
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  3. EM requires massive volume. That's how you learn, especially the procedural aspects. AOA has tiny hospitals that don't get more than 30,000 patients per year. Of course, that doesn't mean all of them suck, just most of them. Typically, you'll need a hospital that serves greater than 30,000 patients per year in the ER. That's assuming all else being equal (quality of teaching, patient profiles, etc...)
     
  4. Hedwig

    Hedwig Senior Member
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    St. Branabas Hosptial in the Bronx has a tremendous volume of patients in its ER. It's a level-1 trauma center that takes the worst of what the Bronx can throw at it--gunshots, stabbings, ODs, etc. It has a very fine reputation, and more ER visits than many allopathic programs. Also, the program at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center is quite good, leading to both AOBEM and ABEM certification.

    So yes, there are some really good AOA ER programs, but not many.
     

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