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ANTIBIOTICS!

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ciestar

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    Oh dear god. How do you keep these things straight?
     
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    rilte4

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    Prayer

    (+Sketchy)
     
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    Osminog

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    Table making seems to work for some of my students.

    I doubt that students could memorize the names of antibiotics just by building furniture. Their time would probably be better spent studying in the library.
     
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    arcus

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    I mainly used Katzung & Trevor Pharmacology Examination and Board Review book useful. Their end of chapter summary charts (see attached screenshot) were very helpful for all drugs but especially for ABX.

    ED522897-B3C5-46A3-B10A-6E31A4CDDD3B.jpeg


    You might also consider the McGraw Hill Access Medicine website for a strategy that will work for you. They list several. It is available for free on the access medicine website - the appendix that is.

    FIVE BASIC STUDY RULES
    Katzung & Trevor's Pharmacology: Examination & Board Review, 11e |
    AccessMedicine | McGraw-Hill Medical


    1. When studying dense textual material, stop after a few pages to write out the main points of it from memory. If necessary, refer to the material just read. After finishing a chapter, construct your own tables of the major drugs, receptor types, mechanisms, and so on, and fill in as many of the blanks as you can. Refer to tables and figures in the book as needed to complete your notes. Create your own mnemonics if possible. Look up other mnemonics in books if you can’t think of one yourself. These are all active learning techniques; mere reading is passive and far less effective unless you happen to have a photographic memory. Your notes should be legible or typed on a computer, and saved for ready access when reviewing for exams.

    2. Experiment with other study methods until you find out what works for you. This may involve solo study or group study, flash cards, or text reading. You won’t know how effective these techniques are until you have tried them.


    3. Don’t scorn “cramming,” but don’t rely on it either. Some steady, day-by-day reading and digestion of conceptual material is usually needed to avoid last-minute indigestion. Similarly, don’t substitute memorization of lists (eg, the Key Words list, Appendix II) for more substantive understanding.

    4. If you are preparing for a course examination, make every effort to attend all the lectures. The lecturer’s view of what is important may be different from that of the author of a course textbook, and chances are good that exam questions will be based on the instructor’s own lecture notes.

    5. If old test questions are legitimately available [as they are for the USMLE (United States Medical Licensing Examination | Practice Materials) and courses in most professional schools], make use of these guides to study. By definition, they are a strong indicator of what the examination writers have considered core infor-mation in the recent past (also see point 4). Use the wrong answers to test yourself. Do you know the drug class referred to and its mechanism of action? If you have trouble with certain concepts or drugs, and you repeatedly miss questions on this topic, it helps to create a list of frequently missed facts or concepts for cramming later. Other strategies are to expand the question in the following way: If you come across a drug that is eliminated with zero order kinetics, ask yourself “what other drugs do I know that are eliminated with zero order kinetics?” Similarly, if you come across a question focused on the fact that β blockers are contraindicated in vasospastic angina, you can ask “what other conditions present a con-traindication to β blockers?” These notes will become your personal high-yield list to study from, targeted to items that you frequently missed.

    Otherwise repetition is your best friend
     
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    deleted407021

    Sketchy! Those “cephtriaxone tri-axes” will always stick with me.
     
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    Psai

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    ancef
    if ancef allergic then vanc
    if in the belly then maybe some flagyl or if you're near the abdomen or pelvis then gent
     

    Stagg737

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    Before boards it was a little sketchy (the pharm section was only partially complete when I took boards) mixed with brute force cram and dump for me. After boards it's Sanford Guide all day long with the ID consult for complex patients:

    513nsBCCifL._SX340_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
     
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    mistafab

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    After the school/lecture stuff, the most important factor is pure memorization.

    Pharm for the antibiotics go EXCELLENT with flashcards or repeated assesment style learning. Figure out a) each mechanism b) each class specific side effect and c) cases where you would and would not use each antibiotic.

    A and B you can learn now, C takes a little time and integration with other subjects over the course of second year material - at least it did for me anyway.
     
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    QueenJames

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    Read FA.....

    over and over and over and over and over....

    and over and over again. *Marshawn Lynch voice*
     
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    QueenJames

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    After the school/lecture stuff, the most important factor is pure memorization.

    Pharm for the antibiotics go EXCELLENT with flashcards or repeated assesment style learning. Figure out a) each mechanism b) each class specific side effect and c) cases where you would and would not use each antibiotic.

    A and B you can learn now, C takes a little time and integration with other subjects over the course of second year material - at least it did for me anyway.

    YYAAADDAAAADAAMMEEANNNNNNNNNNN
     
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    QueenJames

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    Yarr'ahalla? Yadadamin? Sav boi

    I entirely admore the username and the pic bro bro.

    Hence...

    Everytime we end up on the same thread... you shall always receive a "yadadamean" from me.

    #TOWNBIDNESS
     
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